Recent Posts

Pages: 1 ... 7 8 [9] 10
81
General Religious Discussion / Re: The EET (Evangelical Extra Terrestrials)
« Last post by junebug72 on January 12, 2017, 03:00:20 AM »
For both, Why don't atheists believe you?
82

OAA's post suggests that nurture is more influential that nature.

No? It suggests that an aborted fetus could have grown up to be either detrimental or helpful to society, and we have no way of knowing which. To assume the latter is wishful thinking, as jaimehlers put it, and an unrealistic view of people.

We're not disagreeing - at least I don't think so.

Your remark - children are blank slates - didn't strike me as hyperbolic. I interpreted it as "a kid is not born 'good' or 'bad', so no need to assume anything either way."

I did take it one step further in my post than you specifically stated - referring to a broader argument about nature versus nurture. Blame my social science fascination and desire to move the conversation forward toward ...something.

Well now why don't you just move the conversation where ever you want?  You could address my point that changing what you call the decision is not going to stop the shaming of women.  Do you agree or disagree? 

What do you think about my concern that the more casual we get with abortion the more likely the underlying problems will not get addressed? 
83
OAA's post suggests that nurture is more influential that nature.

No? It suggests that an aborted fetus could have grown up to be either detrimental or helpful to society, and we have no way of knowing which. To assume the latter is wishful thinking, as jaimehlers put it, and an unrealistic view of people.

I don't really agree with; ''we don't really know which''.  The chances that my aborted fetus would be a good person is actually quite high.   If I had kept the baby I would have loved it and nurtured it. 
84
OAA's post suggests that nurture is more influential that nature.

No? It suggests that an aborted fetus could have grown up to be either detrimental or helpful to society, and we have no way of knowing which. To assume the latter is wishful thinking, as jaimehlers put it, and an unrealistic view of people.

Listen, an aborted fetus never grows up to be anything. While there is no point in speculating what could have been if the fetus had not been aborted, there is also no reason to assume that children who survive the womb come out as blank slates. That has nothing to do with the situation. That is a separate conversation. That's why I called it out. The decision to get an abortion is difficult for some. That should be indisputable. However, we have people who are trying their best to convince women that they should think nothing of the life that is growing in their belly. That's fucked up. It's not like trying to decide what color Toyota Prius you want to buy.

I am pro choice in the sense that the way I see it, you have three choices.

1. Abort it.
2. Give birth and raise it yourself.
3. Give birth and give it up for adoption.

All three choices involve a life or death decision. How could that not be a difficult decision for a person to make?

Take religion and politics out of the equation and think about it for a minute.

85
Science / Re: On being a psychopath
« Last post by Emma286 on January 11, 2017, 06:52:26 PM »
I've heard it's something like 1 in 30 people who are one. Fairly sure that was from Robert Hare's book "Without Conscience: The Disturbing World of the Psychopaths Amongst Us", as well as in a book I once read on workplace bullying written by Tim Field.
86
Science / Re: On being a psychopath
« Last post by eh! on January 11, 2017, 06:38:21 PM »
It would appear to me psychopaths are well equipped to succeed in modern society.
87

OAA's post suggests that nurture is more influential that nature.

No? It suggests that an aborted fetus could have grown up to be either detrimental or helpful to society, and we have no way of knowing which. To assume the latter is wishful thinking, as jaimehlers put it, and an unrealistic view of people.

We're not disagreeing - at least I don't think so.

Your remark - children are blank slates - didn't strike me as hyperbolic. I interpreted it as "a kid is not born 'good' or 'bad', so no need to assume anything either way."

I did take it one step further in my post than you specifically stated - referring to a broader argument about nature versus nurture. Blame my social science fascination and desire to move the conversation forward toward ...something.
88
General Religious Discussion / Re: The EET (Evangelical Extra Terrestrials)
« Last post by eh! on January 11, 2017, 05:08:18 PM »
Good idea ocg, unfortunately I am not creative so can't contribute.

Best of luck tho.
89
OAA's post suggests that nurture is more influential that nature.

No? It suggests that an aborted fetus could have grown up to be either detrimental or helpful to society, and we have no way of knowing which. To assume the latter is wishful thinking, as jaimehlers put it, and an unrealistic view of people.
90
I'm not sure any discussion needs to be made of it, to be honest.  I mean, the whole "what if Einstein had been aborted" thing smacks of a logical fallacy - probably an appeal to wishful thinking, or something like that.  I think most people are going to see it and agree with it, and I'm not sure what people who don't are going to discuss.

It is my nagging thoughts.  Not an argument.  ;)

The wishful thinking is that by changing what you call the decision, difficult, women will stop being shamed for having abortions.  We are shamed because some people think it's reckless and they are not shy to tell the world.

We are not winning the debates!  The only moral ground is that the cells have no right to the uterus. :o That's the best we got???  That was Matt Dillahunty vs another humanist.   You can watch it on you tube.  Warning they show graphic material.  I watched another debate; Should abortion be legal?  That was a good argument.  The professor conceded it was wrong but made a good case as to why it should be legal.  The catholic man she debated conceded to birth control.  Her best point was this: until you fix the problems in society that cause abortion it should be legal and that women will still seek them even if it's not. 

There is no denying my life would be much different right now if I had made another decision or was not given the right to choose.   I don't know why but I think about it sometimes.  Probably because my life is not what I wanted but what I got.

I get it, I'm not the champion of abortion.  It is not that perfect story where the woman gets all she wants.  It's the real deal.  I am in the majority not the minority of the kind of woman that gets an abortion.  Poor, check and victim of child abuse, check.

Pages: 1 ... 7 8 [9] 10