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51
Chatter / Elis Island Medal of Honor
« Last post by Mr. Blackwell on January 21, 2017, 10:48:06 PM »
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The National Ethnic Coalition of Organizations – NECO is the sponsor of the Ellis Island Medals of Honor that are presented each year on historic Ellis Island to a select group of individuals whose accomplishments in their field and inspired service to our nation are cause for celebration. 2016 marks the 30th anniversary of the Medal and we are planning a spectacular event worthy of such an auspicious milestone.

The Ellis Island Medals of Honor embody the spirit of America in their celebration of patriotism, tolerance, brotherhood and diversity. They recognize individuals who have made it their mission to share with those less fortunate their wealth of knowledge, indomitable courage, boundless compassion, unique talents and selfless generosity; all while maintaining the traditions of their ethnic heritage as they uphold the ideals and spirit of America.  As always, NECO remains dedicated to the maintenance and restoration of America’s greatest symbol of its immigrant history, Ellis Island.

Since its founding in 1986, the Medal has been officially recognized by both Houses of Congress as one of our nation’s most prestigious awards. In that time we have honored distinguished and diverse Americans including six Presidents of the United States; Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, as well as esteemed Americans such as Frank Sinatra, Lee Iacocca, Quincy Jones, Muhammad Ali, Nobel laureate Elie Wiesel,  Louis Zamperini and Rosa Parks, just to name a few.

Personally, I have never heard of this award before today but that is beside the point. The thing I found interesting about it was the list of people who received the award at the first ceremony in 1986.

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These are the winners, by ancestry and present or former profession or occupation: Muhammad Ali, African-American, boxer. Charles Allen, English, broker. Michel C. Bergerac, French, businessman. Dr. C. Kazys Bobelis, Lithuanian, surgeon. Victor Borge, Danish, entertainer. Joe Bowen, Welsh, contractor. John Brademas, Greek, educator. Zbigniew Brzezinski, Polish, educator. Anita Bryant, Native American, entertainer. Curtis L. Carlson, Swedish, executive. Cesar Chavez, Mexican, labor leader. Mildred Imach Cleghorn, Native American, activist. Claudette Colbert, French, actress. Walter Cronkite, Dutch, journalist. Edward J. DeBartolo, Italian, developer. John Denver, German, singer. Joe DiMaggio, Italian, baseball player. Lev. E. Dobriansky, Ukrainian, diplomat. Christopher J. Dodd, Irish, poltician. Kirk Douglas, Russian, actor. Alex Esclamato, Philippine, publisher. Archbishop Patrick P. Flores, Mexican, cleric. Erik J. Friis, Norwegian, activist. A. Bartlett Giamatti, Italian, educator. Roberto C. Goizueta, Cuban, executive. Dr. Vartan Gregorian, Armenian, librarian. Jon Hanson, Austrian, developer. Helen Hayes, Irish, actress. John F. Henning, Irish, labor leader. Benjamin Hooks, African-American, activist. Dolores Reade Hope, Irish, philanthropist. K. P. Hwang, Korean, executive. Archbishop Iakovos, Greek, cleric. Daniel K. Inouye, Japanese-American, politician. Tyyni Kalervo, Finnish, restaurateur. Dr. George S. Kanahele, Hawaiian-American, educator. Dr. Har Gobind Khorana, Asian-Indian, educator. Coretta Scott King, African-American, activist. John W. Kluge, German, executive. John Cardinal Krol, Polish, cleric. Frank Lausche, Yugoslav, politician. Jean MacArthur, English, philanthropist. The Rev. Douglas Lachlan MacLean, Scottish, theologian. Dr. Herbert P. MacNeal, Scottish, physician. Archbishop Torkom Manoogian, Armenian, cleric. Aloysius A. Mazewski, Polish, activist. Dr. Matthew Mestrovic, Croatian, activisit. Carlos Montoya, Spanish, guitarist. Prof. Gabriel Nahas, French, pharmacologist. Martina Navratilova, Czechoslovak, athlete. Michael Novak, Slovak, writer. Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, French, editor. Arnold Palmer, Scottish, athlete. Milan Panic, Yugoslav, executive. Dr. Antonia Pantoja, Puerto Rican, social worker. Rosa Parks, African-American, activist. Gregory Peck, English, actor. John Petlica, Czechoslovak, broadcaster. Milton Petrie, Russian, philanthropist. Orville Prestholdt, Norwegian, Government official. Claire Quintal, Canadian, educator. Louise Rodrigues, Portuguese, teacher. Peter Rona, Hungarian, banker. Mirielle Rostad, Belgian, nurse. Paul Sanchez, Puerto Rican, labor leader. Domenick S. Scaglione, Italian, banker. Prof. Leo Schelbert, Swiss, educator. The Rev. Wallace R. Schulz, German, cleric. Dr. Glenn T. Seaborg, Swedish, scientist. Elsbeth M. Seewald, German, activist. Alexander Spanos, Greek, executive. Arthur Ochs Sulzberger, German, publisher. Dr. Zoltan Szaz, Hungarian, lobbyist. James Tamer, Lebanese, activist. Donald J. Trump, German, developer. Dr. Andrew Udvardy, Hungarian, activist. Barbara Walters, Rumanian, broadcaster. Andy Williams, Welsh, singer. Dr. Vera von Wiren-Garczynski, Russian, educator. Prof. Chien-Shung Wu, Chinese, physicist.

http://www.nytimes.com/1986/10/16/nyregion/80-named-as-recipients-of-ellis-island-awards.html

I highlighted the names I recognize. I stumbled upon this little tidbit of trivia via Snopes while I was digging around for info on Trump.

From the Snopes article.

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In the summer of 2016, as Donald Trump made strong arguments against immigration and said that he would build a border wall and deport illegal immigrants, the following photograph circulated, showing the Republican presidential nominee alongside Muhammad Ali and Rosa Parks...While Donald Trump has battled accusations of racism throughout his 2016 presidential campaign (and throughout much of his career), his supporters have shared the above-displayed photograph as proof that Trump is not racist.[1]
 1. Like I said, first time I have ever heard about it but then, I am not a Trump supporter.

Snopes concludes the rumor to be true but went on to explain:

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However, the fact that Donald Trump received the award and posed for a photograph says little about his motivations or whether or not he has racist tendencies, only that he received an award and participated in a ceremony meant to honor him (and others).

http://www.snopes.com/trump-received-ellis-island-award-in-1986/

Well, Snopes, the same can be said for everyone who ever received the award, including Hillary Clinton in 1999. That is a piss poor argument to try to dismiss someone's accomplishments.
52
Chatter / Re: The War on SJWs
« Last post by The Gawd on January 21, 2017, 10:36:55 PM »
Example of a shrill sjw retard;

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=FeNJFz-WCZs

The slimey guy seems to be the problem in that video. Can't be defending pieces of garbage like that.
53
Chatter / Re: The War on SJWs
« Last post by The Gawd on January 21, 2017, 10:33:13 PM »

Like Sam you lack perspective. Because you lack context you have no concept of how cheap your gasoline is, even since the spike when Bush II was in office.

http://oilprice.com/Energy/Oil-Prices/Top-10-Countries-With-The-Cheapest-And-Most-Expensive-Gas.html
https://www.statista.com/statistics/221368/gas-prices-around-the-world/
http://money.cnn.com/pf/features/lists/global_gasprices/

Do you benefit from being a citizen of the wealthiest country on earth? How do you think that wealth was attained?

No, trust me, I'm well aware of how much more expensive gasoline is in other countries. My point is, the last 15 or 20 years have seen some fairly remarkable examples of American foreign policy misadventures - the net result of which hasn't seemed to keep the cost of my gas bill down. If anything, I'd argue the direct result was to see it rise.

The story of how America became the wealthiest country on Earth could probably fill a few thousand page volumes. To lack perspective is to imply that story boils down the nefarious work of liars, thieves, and warmongers.

Then you have cheap gas, like I said. It is the military might keeping the gas prices down either by force or coercion. That is the point. And, yes, I think you can easily narrow it down to stolen land and forced labor helped along with stolen resources from other countries. But if you cannot agree to these simple and obvious facts I can also see how you would find Sam Harris credible in the videos I posted. It also proves my point that when you are benefiting from the actual most dangerous threat to civilization it may cloud your judgment on your other perceived threats.

Our leaders put their hand on Bibles while being sworn in, and invoke Christianity when they decide to drop these missiles on hundreds of thousands of people across the globe. Let us not mistake that for a few dozens of people killed here and there by Muslim radicals reacting to the fact that we kill countless people in our acts of aggression.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/15/iraq-death-toll_n_4102855.html

When ISIS gets their numbers that high we can discuss about what is more dangerous. Until then this notion of radical Islam being more dangerous than Christianity and the U.S. foreign policy is absurd and laughable.
54
Chatter / Re: The War on SJWs
« Last post by eh! on January 21, 2017, 10:23:41 PM »
Example of a shrill sjw retard;

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=FeNJFz-WCZs
55
Chatter / Re: The War on SJWs
« Last post by BlackLight on January 21, 2017, 10:19:47 PM »

Like Sam you lack perspective. Because you lack context you have no concept of how cheap your gasoline is, even since the spike when Bush II was in office.

http://oilprice.com/Energy/Oil-Prices/Top-10-Countries-With-The-Cheapest-And-Most-Expensive-Gas.html
https://www.statista.com/statistics/221368/gas-prices-around-the-world/
http://money.cnn.com/pf/features/lists/global_gasprices/

Do you benefit from being a citizen of the wealthiest country on earth? How do you think that wealth was attained?

No, trust me, I'm well aware of how much more expensive gasoline is in other countries. My point is, the last 15 or 20 years have seen some fairly remarkable examples of American foreign policy misadventures - the net result of which hasn't seemed to keep the cost of my gas bill down. If anything, I'd argue the direct result was to see it rise.

The story of how America became the wealthiest country on Earth could probably fill a few thousand page volumes. To lack perspective is to imply that story boils down to the nefarious work of liars, thieves, and warmongers.
56
Chatter / Re: The War on SJWs
« Last post by eh! on January 21, 2017, 10:18:41 PM »
His biggest problem is he sometimes can't break things down in small enough & simple chunks in order to get his message thru the thickest skulls.
He doesn't have a grasp of any topic outside of the ones he is actually learned in. It's pretty clear when you listen to him. Still waiting on your example BTW.

Refer to JB's links.
57
Chatter / Re: The War on SJWs
« Last post by The Gawd on January 21, 2017, 10:05:00 PM »

You don't think Sam benefits from America's might being flexed across the world?

Heck, I'm an American like Sam. I'd like to know how I've benefited from it.

Do you like inexpensive gasoline?

I did, when it was inexpensive. Not so much now. Cheapest gas I can ever remember seeing was $0.89/gal in the summer of 1998 (Upstate NY). When I moved to Los Angeles (in 2003), I remember seeing $1.69/gal. Right now, it's about $2.69/gal out here. It's been over 10 years since I've seen it fall below $2.00, and there's been times since then that it's been over $4.00.

Like Sam you lack perspective. Because you lack context you have no concept of how cheap your gasoline is, even since the spike when Bush II was in office.

http://oilprice.com/Energy/Oil-Prices/Top-10-Countries-With-The-Cheapest-And-Most-Expensive-Gas.html
https://www.statista.com/statistics/221368/gas-prices-around-the-world/
http://money.cnn.com/pf/features/lists/global_gasprices/

Do you benefit from being a citizen of the wealthiest country on earth? How do you think that wealth was attained?
58
Chatter / Re: The War on SJWs
« Last post by BlackLight on January 21, 2017, 09:55:26 PM »

You don't think Sam benefits from America's might being flexed across the world?

Heck, I'm an American like Sam. I'd like to know how I've benefited from it.

Do you like inexpensive gasoline?

I did, when it was inexpensive. Not so much now. Cheapest gas I can ever remember seeing was $0.89/gal in the summer of 1998 (Upstate NY). When I moved to Los Angeles (in 2003), I remember seeing $1.69/gal. Right now, it's about $2.69/gal out here. It's been over 10 years since I've seen it fall below $2.00, and there's been times since then that it's been over $4.00.



59
Chatter / Re: The War on SJWs
« Last post by The Gawd on January 21, 2017, 09:48:24 PM »

You don't think Sam benefits from America's might being flexed across the world?

Heck, I'm an American like Sam. I'd like to know how I've benefited from it.

Do you like inexpensive gasoline?
60
Chatter / Re: The War on SJWs
« Last post by jaimehlers on January 21, 2017, 09:46:35 PM »
The business of NYC issuing fines over pronouns is nowhere near as cut and dried as some people would have us believe.  The fine is for discriminating against transgendered people, which deliberately referring to them with the wrong pronoun falls under.  I'm not going to argue that people shouldn't have the right to express themselves, but at the same time, I don't accept that people should be able to get away with saying whatever they want, especially if it's intended to hurt others.  There are a number of examples where someone can be penalized for inappropriately expressing themselves.  We already talked about one, defamation, but there are others as well.

One of the most well-known ones is falsely yelling "Fire!" in a crowded venue, and being held responsible for stuff that happens as a result.  That columnist you linked to earlier acknowledged as much in another article, by saying that false statements (such as defamation, perjury, and fraud) are not constitutionally protected.  But his implication, that it is the falseness of such speech which removes it from the Constitution's protection, is not quite accurate.

For example, consider blackmail/extortion, the use of threats (usually threats of exposure of something a person would rather keep hidden) to force people to do things against their will.  Since blackmail is a crime, it means that freedom of speech does not protect the blackmailer, yet blackmail is necessarily a credible threat, meaning that it refers to true things.  So we already have cases where true statements can be penalized or criminalized, provided that they are intended to cause harm to another person.  So it isn't unreasonable to conclude that other kinds of speech which are intended to deliberately harm others would also not be protected under the Constitution.
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