Recent Posts

Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 ... 10
31
Chatter / Re: Mt. McKinley No Longer -- Here Comes Mt. Obama!
« Last post by nogodsforme on Today at 03:48:43 PM »
Which makes the likelihood of a Ted Cruz or a Marco Rubio nomination somewhat problematic for the teaparty birther wingnuts. They have doubled down so hard on the racism and anti-foreigner rhetoric, it may be too hard for their leaders to dial it back now.
32
General Religious Discussion / Re: Proof of God! But is it?
« Last post by nogodsforme on Today at 03:44:32 PM »
I don't know that you can follow critical thinking and rational analysis of evidence and conclude that there are gods. That is, you have to decide that, although there is no proof, invisible undetectable supernatural beings are actively affecting life on earth. And then you have to go further and specify what these invisible, undetectable beings are like, what they want, and so on. Lots of guesswork with answers pulled from thin air. And if you can get some people to believe the answers you pull from thin air, you have yourself a religion.  Looking at all the different religious answers that people have come up with over human history tells us that there is nothing so farfetched and unlikely that somebody has not proposed it as the supernatural answer to the important questions of life.

No question leads inevitably to a supernatural answer--every question that humans have looked at so far and gotten answers to have had natural explanations. We have gone from gods everywhere, walking around in public chatting with folks and giving orders and causing all kinds of havoc, to gods hiding inside of quantum physics. It seems to me that to get to a supernatural answer, you have to make that "leap of faith" where you leave evidence and rationality behind.

So, yeah, that is my longwinded answer to say that I think there is a limit to critical thinking when it comes to faith.  :laugh:
33
Chatter / Re: Mt. McKinley No Longer -- Here Comes Mt. Obama!
« Last post by Nam on Today at 03:31:11 PM »
It's exactly the same except Obama was born in the US.

He's also black, but I'm sure that has nothing to do with it.

-Nam

-One

I am sure that's most likely the reason but in today's racist makeup even Latino/Hispanics aren't considered True White™.

-Nam
34
Chatter / Re: Mt. McKinley No Longer -- Here Comes Mt. Obama!
« Last post by One Above All on Today at 03:29:42 PM »
It's exactly the same except Obama was born in the US.

He's also black, but I'm sure that has nothing to do with it.

-Nam

-One
35
Chatter / Re: Mt. McKinley No Longer -- Here Comes Mt. Obama!
« Last post by Nam on Today at 03:27:05 PM »

Alaska only has 3 electoral votes.
Every little helps...
Quote
Donald Trump may be in the lead but no way he gets the presidency. Hispanics, women, and Asians (so far) will make sure of that.
Strangely, studies of attitudes of resident immigrants show that many of them are opposed to further immigration as they recognise that for each 1,000 or so that arrive, their own standing, security and respect goes down. I would not rely on all women: I'm sure that many of them see him as the star of a TV show and a strong, rich, opinionated male - this appeals to a certain type of woman.

Quote
Rubio would be Republicans best shot. But as the map shows above: even that's not enough.
The betting odds are interesting: http://www.oddschecker.com/politics/us-politics/us-presidential-election-2016/republican-candidate

Schwarzenegger couldn't become president, he was born in Austria with Austrian parents. Ted Cruz is eligible because of his mother, who is an american. I remember a woman in Texas was asked "Since Ted Cruz was born in Canada, do you think he should be president?" She said yes because he has an american mother. The guy then said, "But you believe Obama was born in Kenya? She, " Yeah..." and he continued, "...his mother is also american?" She wavered a bit and then said something to the effect that it wasn't the same thing. It's exactly the same except Obama was born in the US.

-Nam
36
General Religious Discussion / Re: "I Was Once an Atheist"
« Last post by Steve on Today at 03:04:55 PM »

It is just very odd to me that if someone says "I was a Christian but now I'm an atheist," that is fine with you guys. But if someone says "I was an atheist and now I'm a Christian," you guys can't seem to comprehend how that's possible and the person must've not been an atheist in the first place.
Seriously! Please do think about what you say before you say it. If you thought about it first you would not have made such a stupid statement. (but then again you are religious)
To go from atheist to theist is to go from sensible to stupid, put another way to go from atheist (believing in fact/evidence) to theist(imagination/no-evidence) the only way that could happen to anybody is via a major head trauma. That is why it isn't a possibility. As said think a little, use that brain of yours sometimes. Then you may just get it. (I think I may be flogging a dead horse trying to get you to actually think.)
37
Chatter / Re: Mt. McKinley No Longer -- Here Comes Mt. Obama!
« Last post by wright on Today at 02:51:29 PM »
His idea to deport some 12 million Mexican people fits the bill. It worked so well during the Great Depression in the 1930's when about a million people, many of them US citizens, were forced to go to Mexico. Neighborhoods and parks in Mexican barrios were blocked off and everyone inside rounded up, arrested without due process, and summarily deported. Activists, labor protesters, strike leaders and community spokespeople were particularly targeted. Entire communities became like deserted post-war zones, as the desperate family members who had not yet been arrested searched for missing relatives. :(

As far as I know, there has been no official apology, let along reparations to the people who lost their homes, businesses and livelihoods.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexican_Repatriation

This was an unconstitutional action on par with the Japanese internment, but few people even know it happened. Maybe someone needs to write a popular novel so they can make a movie about it. :P

(clicks on link)

F*cking shit.

That's one bit of California / US history I never learned in school. Thanks, nogods.
38
General Religious Discussion / Re: Proof of God! But is it?
« Last post by OldChurchGuy on Today at 02:29:15 PM »
I agree critical thinking is important.  [...] Others see it as a way to deepen their faith.  I tend to gravitate to the second camp. 
Quote
It would seem that, in strategy or science, critical thinking is the only way to go, but it seems that this is not applicable in matters of faith.

You seem to be suggesting that critical thinking is "all right as far as I allow it to go, but, after that, any explanation is as good as any other, so let us accept the printed version."

Do you find there is a limit beyond which, in faith, one cannot progress "critical thinking"?

I admit I have not found a limit to critical thinking in matters of faith.  Although, I get the impression you and nogodsforme conclude there is a limit. 

If one applies critical thinking to theism, is it inevitable one becomes an atheist? 

Quote
What motivates a person to think like that?

To think there is a limit to critical thinking?  I suppose when the critical thinking gets in the way of their faith. 

As always,

OldChurchGuy 
39
Chatter / Re: Mt. McKinley No Longer -- Here Comes Mt. Obama!
« Last post by nogodsforme on Today at 02:19:38 PM »
Trump appears to be mainly running his mouth, as opposed to an actual campaign. Nearly every policy proposal he makes is incredibly mean, idiotic, was already tried with bad results, is logistically impossible due to budget constraints or all four.

His idea to deport some 12 million Mexican people fits the bill. It worked so well during the Great Depression in the 1930's when about a million people, many of them US citizens, were forced to go to Mexico. Neighborhoods and parks in Mexican barrios were blocked off and everyone inside rounded up, arrested without due process, and summarily deported. Activists, labor protesters, strike leaders and community spokespeople were particularly targeted. Entire communities became like deserted post-war zones, as the desperate family members who had not yet been arrested searched for missing relatives. :(

As far as I know, there has been no official apology, let along reparations to the people who lost their homes, businesses and livelihoods.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexican_Repatriation

This was an unconstitutional action on par with the Japanese internment, but few people even know it happened. Maybe someone needs to write a popular novel so they can make a movie about it. :P
40
The problem with the KJV is the English is getting out of date and the translation is not as good as current ones. Here's Gen 2:17 in the NIV translation
Quote
17 but you must not eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, for when you eat from it you will certainly die.”
That makes if quite clear what is being said. the man will become mortal. The KJV suggests he will die immediately on eating it.

This makes the pericope with the snake in Gen3 sound better too. Genesis 3:4-5
Quote
4 “You will not certainly die,” the serpent said to the woman. 5 “For God knows that when you eat from it your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God, knowing good and evil.”
Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 ... 10