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Community Zone => Chatter => Topic started by: One Above All on July 26, 2013, 07:41:11 AM

Title: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on July 26, 2013, 07:41:11 AM
A simple game: I give you a word or a phrase in Portuguese, and you guess what that word/phrase means in English from a list of choices I give you. Winners get to learn bits of a different language. Losers get absolutely nothing. No cheating by checking translators, obviously.

Ready? Set! Go!

Word/Phrase in Portuguese:
"Sentença"

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: LoriPinkAngel on July 26, 2013, 08:18:57 AM
I love languages.

This would be easier for me if you wrote out a whole sentence in Portuguese.

I am  picking the options of computer mouse & animal mouse as a wild guess.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on July 26, 2013, 08:20:54 AM
This would be easier for me if you wrote out a whole sentence in Portuguese.

That would be too easy, IMO.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Anfauglir on July 26, 2013, 08:41:14 AM
I'm going to guess that its definitely NOT "1&2" or "4&5" - other languages tend not to have as many homonyms as English - or, at least, its rare that one of their words will have the same homonyms as one of ours!

I'm going to guess sentence, as in for criminals.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on July 26, 2013, 08:43:03 AM
<snip>
other languages tend not to have as many homonyms as English - or, at least, its rare that one of their words will have the same homonyms as one of ours!

Don't be so sure about the first part. You make a good point about the second part, though.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on July 26, 2013, 10:08:06 AM
1 & 2 simply because it looks like them :)
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Nick on July 26, 2013, 10:44:04 AM
Somewhere, of course in the South, they are complaining that the schools are teaching kids Spanish.  That is the mentality we are dealing with here in the states.  The school in my little town is getting a foreign exchange student this upcoming school year.  He is from Germany and speaks several languages.  Man, is he going to be a fish out of water here.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Ambassador Pony on July 26, 2013, 10:52:46 AM
bm
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: LoriPinkAngel on July 26, 2013, 01:13:28 PM
A person who speaks many languages:  Multilingual

A person who speaks two languages:  Bilingual

A person who speaks only one language:  American
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on July 26, 2013, 01:19:28 PM
A person who speaks many languages:  Multilingual

A person who speaks two languages:  Bilingual

A person who speaks only one language:  American

I used to be able to speak four languages, but, after a long time of not speaking French, now I can only understand it when spoken to me (slowly) and when written.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on July 27, 2013, 08:57:04 AM
I think I've waited enough time. The winner is... Anfauglir!

I'm going to guess sentence, as in for criminals.

Next word: Frase

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: wright on July 27, 2013, 12:45:33 PM
Interesting game you have here, One. I'll play, thanks.

Next word: Frase

Meaning in English:
  • Pie
  • Phrase
  • Sentence (in the sense of a group of words)
  • Good (the adjective)
  • Good (the noun)
  • Nothing
  • The second and third options
  • The fourth and fifth options

(Inserts word into brain, engages main "FIND MATCH" lever. Watches little wheels, springs and counterweights spin furiously, trying to associate input with poorly-remembered Spanish vocabulary. Sparks, smoke, grinding noises ensue. Finally, big pink neon sign buzzes and lights up: NADA. ZILCH. ZERO. JUST GUESS ALREADY SO WE CAN MOVE ON TO SOMETHING MORE PRODUCTIVE, LIKE CATCHING UP ON http://cuteoverload.com/ (http://cuteoverload.com/))

My blood sugar is still a little low, so I'll go for the top of the list. Seldom met a pie I didn't like.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: LoriPinkAngel on July 27, 2013, 01:18:51 PM
Well it's pretty similar to the french for fresh and strawberry so I'll go with "pie",  my second choice is phrase because of the similar letters.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on July 28, 2013, 02:24:43 PM
Everyone loses. It's "sentence".

Short explanation:
"Frase" is what we (or at least my English teachers) call a "false friend". It looks and sounds very similar to "phrase", but, in fact, "phrase" means "expressão" (expression) or "ditado" (saying). AFAIK there is no direct translation for the term; it's either "expressão" or "ditado", depending on the context.

Next word: "Mente"

Meaning in English:

I gotta say, I'm surprised anyone even posted. I had been wanting to start this thread for a few weeks, but I was unsure of whether anyone would accept the idea.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Ambassador Pony on July 28, 2013, 08:11:08 PM
It's "sentence".

I knew that.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on July 29, 2013, 03:42:35 AM
mind because it shares letters with mental?(!)
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on July 29, 2013, 04:44:23 AM
It's "sentence".

I knew that.

Then guess. Don't just come here after it's all over and say that.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: LoriPinkAngel on July 29, 2013, 04:05:07 PM
I shall guess mint.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Ambassador Pony on July 29, 2013, 06:48:45 PM
It's "sentence".

I knew that.

Then guess. Don't just come here after it's all over and say that.

Please only post one per day.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Ambassador Pony on July 29, 2013, 06:51:05 PM
mind because it shares letters with mental?(!)

It's a tough one because it shares the same characteristic with lie in French too.

Mentir = to lie
mental
menthe

I'd go with the last option. But, I think it's a trap.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on July 30, 2013, 01:34:05 PM
Ambassador Pony wins.

There's actually a joke that was going around a few years ago, revolving around the meaning of the word "Mente", about our previous prime-minister, José Sócrates. It only works in Portuguese, but I'll translate anyway. It goes more or less like this[1]:

[picture of Newton]
Mente génia (Genius mind)

[picture of Einstein]
Mente brilhante (Brilliant mind)

[picture of José Sócrates]
Mente muito (lies a lot)

Next phrase: Olhos que não vêm, coração que não sente.

Meaning in English:

EDIT: If you have any word/phrase requests, feel free to send me a PM.
 1. I shortened it a bit because I can't remember it that well.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Dante on July 30, 2013, 02:43:53 PM

Next phrase: Olhos que não vêm, coração que não sente.

I'll guess.....

Quote
  • Out of sight, out of mind.

What do I win?
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on July 30, 2013, 02:46:23 PM
<snip>
What do I win?

Assuming you guessed correctly, you win knowledge. Unless you want a hug or something. I can do that too.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: screwtape on July 30, 2013, 03:55:37 PM
Next phrase: Olhos que não vêm, coração que não sente.

Meaning in English:
  • Out of sight, out of mind.

vêm strikes me as the portuguese version of the spanish verb Ver, to see.  Sente is a lot like "sentience", so, relating to thought and the mind.

Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Dante on July 30, 2013, 04:04:37 PM
<snip>
What do I win?

Assuming you guessed correctly, you win knowledge. Unless you want a hug or something. I can do that too.

You're omnipotent, and all I get is a lousy hug? No wonder I don't worship you.  ;)

And I didn't exactly guess, I used pretty much the method screwtape described.

edit to add: Also, it's the only phrase that has the same word twice.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on July 30, 2013, 04:08:52 PM
You're omnipotent, and all I get is a lousy hug? No wonder I don't worship you.  ;)

Ever been hugged by an omnipotent being? It'd be the best hug of your life, but, since you don't want it... I won't hug you.

And I didn't exactly guess, I used pretty much the method screwtape described.

My point remains.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Dante on July 30, 2013, 05:02:30 PM
A priest tried to hug me once. Just once[1]

Deductive reasoning is slightly better than guessing, no?
 1. Bonus hugs  for getting the movie reference
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on July 30, 2013, 05:05:46 PM
Deductive reasoning is slightly better than guessing, no?

Which is irrelevant to my point, which was an answer to your asking what you'd win if you guessed (or deduced) correctly.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on July 30, 2013, 05:18:29 PM
"Out of sight, out of mind" is my guess, assuming that I am reading it like I would Spanish.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Dante on July 30, 2013, 06:21:02 PM
Deductive reasoning is slightly better than guessing, no?

Which is irrelevant to my point, which was an answer to your asking what you'd win if you guessed (or deduced) correctly.

Except for the "assuming you guessed correctly"  comment.  ;)

I didn't guess.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on July 31, 2013, 04:15:52 PM
Everyone wins.

The literal translation of "Olhos que não vêm, coração que não sente" is "Eyes that don't see, heart that doesn't feel". From there it's not a huge leap of logic to conclude that it means "Out of sight, out of mind". The single comma and repetition of the word "não" (which basically means "no") should also have been a dead-giveaway.[1]

Next word: Amem

Meaning in English:
 1. IMO, anyway.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on July 31, 2013, 04:29:47 PM
amar, amor, Spanish again.

I think it means love, the third person command thing.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on August 01, 2013, 11:37:47 AM
I also guess "out of sight, out of mind" because of the sentence structure, the repetition, and the final word "sente", which sounds as though it has something to do with the mind.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: DumpsterFire on August 01, 2013, 10:53:04 PM
A priest tried to hug me once. Just once[1]

Deductive reasoning is slightly better than guessing, no?
 1. Bonus hugs  for getting the movie reference
Johnny Dangerously, ya fargin' icehole!
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: carstensenscott on August 01, 2013, 11:36:21 PM
This is kool.

Toy is my guess.

Now I will look it up and see how wrong I am. I thought it sounds quite simple. Basic words start out our vocabulary. Oh how wrong I will be after trying to be so clever.

Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 02, 2013, 11:44:13 AM
Sorry for the delay. I'm not good at judging time.
nogodsforme wins.

amar, amor, Spanish again.

I think it means love, the third person command thing.

"Amem" is a form of the verb "Amar", which means "to love". "Amen" in Portuguese is simply "Ámen".

Next word: Graduação

Meaning in English:

This one has a twist to it, which I'll explain once the time is up.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: carstensenscott on August 02, 2013, 06:21:03 PM
Grate.

Gradually shaving till gone. Pshht. 8)

Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 03, 2013, 01:23:19 PM
Everyone loses. The answers were "graduation", "the number of diopters" and "the first and fourth options". Let me explain:
"Graduação", in Portuguese spoken in Portugal, means "the number of diopters", whereas in Brazil (where they basically copy the English language and call it "Portuguese") it means "graduation". Note that this was the only time I would've accepted Portuguese spoken in Brazil as an answer.

Next word: Aquecedor

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on August 05, 2013, 04:34:47 AM
Radiator. "Aque" someting to do with water. radiators are water filled....
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 05, 2013, 07:55:03 AM
It is indeed "radiator", but not for the reason you think. "Água" is "water" in Portuguese. The word/prefix you're looking for is "aqua"; not "aque", although we do have a word, "aqueduto" (aqueduct), which is indeed related to water.

Next word: Dormir

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on August 05, 2013, 08:11:32 AM
sleep. Reason being; the english word dormant comes from the latin "to sleep", dormir is quite similar so possibly has the same latin root...
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on August 05, 2013, 08:35:02 AM
Sleep, I guess. It's the same in Spanish, isn't it? Unless it's a trick question to make us complacent. But none of the other choices seem to fit.

Yes, another English word with the same root would be "dormitory". There are probably others as well, but that comes immediately to mind.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on August 05, 2013, 08:52:47 AM
Yes, another English word with the same root would be "dormitory". There are probably others as well, but that comes immediately to mind.

I recon we've got this one nailed  ;D
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 06, 2013, 07:58:02 AM
Everyone wins.
Two bits of information: I know of no verb in Portuguese that doesn't end in "r". I also know of no word in Portuguese that ends in "r" that isn't a verb.

Next word: Puxar

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on August 06, 2013, 08:09:36 AM
you've already given us a clue for this one

Quote
Olhos que não vêm, coração que não sente" is "Eyes that don't see, heart that doesn't feel".


So it can't be 5, 6 or 7  ;)

Again I'm gonna go with the "it looks a bit like" approach which leaves me with to push or to pull.

Errrr. Flip a coin and I'll go with: To Pull...or Push :D
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on August 06, 2013, 08:37:57 AM
I'm trying to go way back to my high school Spanish classes (35 years ago), and it seems that "to push" might have been "pujar", which, since both j's and x's get pronounced as h, would make this very close to the Spanish as well. And closer to push than to pull in English as well, come to think of it. So I'm guessing Push.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 06, 2013, 02:27:14 PM
you've already given us a clue for this one
<snip>

I was hoping you wouldn't notice that.

So it can't be 5, 6 or 7  ;)

However, don't be so sure about that. "To see" and "To watch" are two different verbs in Portuguese, although "ver" can mean both.

Again I'm gonna go with the "it looks a bit like" approach which leaves me with to push or to pull.

Errrr. Flip a coin and I'll go with: To Pull...or Push :D

I'll flip the coin for you, if you tell me which is heads and which is tails.

EDIT: On an unrelated note, thank you for the +1. I had actually considered ending this game, since not many people seemed interested. The fact that you liked it enough to give me a +1 means I did the right thing by starting it.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on August 07, 2013, 06:02:54 AM
you've already given us a clue for this one
<snip>

I was hoping you wouldn't notice that.

So it can't be 5, 6 or 7  ;)

However, don't be so sure about that. "To see" and "To watch" are two different verbs in Portuguese, although "ver" can mean both.

Again I'm gonna go with the "it looks a bit like" approach which leaves me with to push or to pull.

Errrr. Flip a coin and I'll go with: To Pull...or Push :D

I'll flip the coin for you, if you tell me which is heads and which is tails.

EDIT: On an unrelated note, thank you for the +1. I had actually considered ending this game, since not many people seemed interested. The fact that you liked it enough to give me a +1 means I did the right thing by starting it.

I'm sticking with it either being Push or Pull. Given what jynnan tonnix has said its probably going to be Push.

I'll let you flip the coin for me though ;)

Tails
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 07, 2013, 06:13:21 AM
I'm sticking with it either being Push or Pull. Given what jynnan tonnix has said its probably going to be Push.

I'll let you flip the coin for me though ;)

Tails

I flipped it, assuming tails=push, and it came up heads, so I'm assuming your answer is "pull".
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on August 07, 2013, 06:28:52 AM
I'm sticking with it either being Push or Pull. Given what jynnan tonnix has said its probably going to be Push.

I'll let you flip the coin for me though ;)

Tails

I flipped it, assuming tails=push, and it came up heads, so I'm assuming your answer is "pull".

Yep i'm going with Pull.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on August 07, 2013, 10:45:12 AM
empujar, Spanish for push, I'm going with push. I learned that word while helping women give birth.... :o
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 07, 2013, 04:08:34 PM
Mrjason wins by pure dumb luck.

Yep i'm going with Pull.

"Puxar" (pronounced sort of like poo-char), while similar to "push", actually means "pull". It is yet another "false friend".

Next word: Palavra exdrúxula

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on August 07, 2013, 04:48:11 PM
I say none of the above. That is a magic spell from Harry Potter. Thought you would sneak that by us, didn't you? :? >:(
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on August 08, 2013, 05:55:05 AM
I have no idea where to even start with this one  :-\
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 08, 2013, 06:03:06 AM
I have no idea where to even start with this one  :-\

That's the point. :P
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on August 08, 2013, 06:43:57 AM
I have no idea where to even start with this one  :-\

That's the point. :P

;)

ok.
I'll go with "Word whose most emphatic syllable is the last" because I don't see anything that resembles a number in the phrase...
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on August 08, 2013, 07:23:44 AM
Well, the "palavra" part would be word, but after that it just starts looking Greek. I'm going to go with "none of the above" just because the only discernible root in there would be the "ex", which suggests "outside". Though I know that's probably entirely wrong.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 08, 2013, 01:30:00 PM
Well, the "palavra" part would be word

Indeed.
Small bit of trivia:
In Portuguese (and other languages), words have "genders", if you will. "Palavra" is feminine.

but after that it just starts looking Greek.

I assure you, it is Portuguese. All will be revealed in about three hours.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 08, 2013, 05:45:27 PM
As expected, everyone loses. The correct answer was "Word whose most emphatic syllable is the third to last", although I also would've accepted "First and fourth options". Let me explain:
"Exdrúxula" is a term related to a classification of words, depending on which syllable is the most emphatic. In Portuguese, we have "palavras agudas", words whose most emphatic syllable is the second to last, "palavras graves", words whose most emphatic syllable is the last, and "palavras exdrúxulas", whose meaning I've already explained.
As a rule (and I mean an actual rule; not one of those so-called rules that are full of exceptions), "palavras exdrúxulas" have an acute accent (´) in the third to last syllable. Hence why I would've accepted the penultimate option.

Next word: Último

Meaning in English:

I'm running out of ideas for this game. If you'd like to see it go on, PM me your suggestions. So that everyone can participate, if you suggest a word, I'll do the opposite: give you the word in English and a bunch of Portuguese possibilities.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on August 08, 2013, 08:18:28 PM
Maybe we could have people chime in with other languages? I could do Polish, except that I don't know how to type some of the various letters I would need. I know we have quite a multilingual group here, anyway...
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 09, 2013, 07:04:43 AM
Maybe we could have people chime in with other languages? I could do Polish, except that I don't know how to type some of the various letters I would need. I know we have quite a multilingual group here, anyway...

I'd be fine with that. Any takers?
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: naemhni on August 09, 2013, 07:30:36 AM
Maybe we could have people chime in with other languages? I could do Polish, except that I don't know how to type some of the various letters I would need. I know we have quite a multilingual group here, anyway...

I'd be fine with that. Any takers?

The only ones I could do it in would be French, which would be too easy (lots of people have studied it, even if you haven't studied it, it's often easy to guess, and there's at least one person here whom I know is a native speaker), or Irish, which might be too hard.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: screwtape on August 09, 2013, 07:33:43 AM
You could play "guess that language".   I'll start.  Here's  a phrase in an unknown language.  Guess the meaning in english and the language:

erethey isay onay odgay.

Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on August 09, 2013, 07:45:25 AM

I'd be fine with that. Any takers?

I'll try to come up with something suitably tricky.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 09, 2013, 07:52:16 AM
The only ones I could do it in would be French, which would be too easy (lots of people have studied it, even if you haven't studied it, it's often easy to guess, and there's at least one person here whom I know is a native speaker), or Irish, which might be too hard.

I agree with both your points.

You could play "guess that language".   I'll start.  Here's  a phrase in an unknown language.  Guess the meaning in english and the language:

erethey isay onay odgay.

I recognize the language[1] (if it can even be called that), but I have no idea what it means.

I'll try to come up with something suitably tricky.

I'd appreciate that.
 1. Pig Latin.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on August 09, 2013, 07:57:07 AM
Next word: Último

Meaning in English:
  • Ultimate
  • Last (male)
  • Last (female)
  • Ultimatum
  • Second and third options



I'm gonna go for second and third options. reason being that ultimate means last and you've put the other options in to try and trick us ;)
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on August 09, 2013, 08:10:14 AM
You could play "guess that language".   I'll start.  Here's  a phrase in an unknown language.  Guess the meaning in english and the language:

erethey isay onay odgay.

Hmm not sure, doesn't look like it has latin roots. I'm guessing its a language that doesn't normally use a latinate alphabet like arabic or chinese. but its not either of those two...
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: DumpsterFire on August 09, 2013, 12:43:27 PM
You could play "guess that language".   I'll start.  Here's  a phrase in an unknown language.  Guess the meaning in english and the language:

erethey isay onay odgay.

Hmm not sure, doesn't look like it has latin roots. I'm guessing its a language that doesn't normally use a latinate alphabet like arabic or chinese. but its not either of those two...
It appears to be porcine in origin...  ;)
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 09, 2013, 05:55:47 PM
Everyone loses. The answer was "Last (male)".

Rule of thumb:
Words ending in "-o" tend to be male, and words ending in "-a" tend to be female. One such exception is a place called "Saldanha", which is male.

Next word: Ultimato

Meaning in English:

jynnan tonnix, just tell me when you want to step in.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on August 09, 2013, 08:02:07 PM

jynnan tonnix, just tell me when you want to step in.

Ok, how's this for a start...


Firanka (Polish)

a)Christmas tree

b)drinking glass

c)window

d)curtain

e)folk dance
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on August 09, 2013, 08:34:31 PM
I am guessing window, based on similarity to fenetre in French and ventana in Spanish. I know that Polish is Slavic, not Latin-derived, but that's all I have for ya.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 12, 2013, 03:36:37 PM
Nobody entered, but the answer was "Ultimatum". jynnan tonnix, what was the answer to your quiz?

I must correct a statement I made here recently: there are words ending in "r" that aren't verbs, such as "senhor" (sir) and "horror" (horror).

Next word: Grande

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on August 12, 2013, 03:38:51 PM
Big, still relying on my espanol.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on August 13, 2013, 07:08:45 AM
I was waiting to see whether there were going to be any more guesses.

The answer was d) Curtain.

And, yes, nogods, I noticed the similarity in the words for window in other languages when I was trying to come up with alternate guesses. I'd never thought of that before, but it struck me that there might be a common root in there, since curtains and windows go together, as it were. It had also occurred to me that the first three letters (fir), might be related to vir, which seemed as though it might have something to do with glass as well, but I was probably thinking of vitreous, which is a bit of a stretch. Anyway, it's always fun to think about things like that.

I remember first getting fascinated with the relationships between words in other languages when I was about 8 or so, and someone had taught me the German words to "Silent Night"...and a couple of days later, I was walking around in my bathrobe, which is "szlafrok" in Polish, and it suddenly hit me that the first part, "szlaf", was pronounced just like the "schlaf" in the carol, which meant sleep, and "frok" was just like the English (and probably German) word for a dress. Anyway, that epiphany was way exciting to my 8 year old mind!
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 14, 2013, 08:27:12 AM
nogodsforme wins.

Big, still relying on my espanol.

Next word: Duvidar

Meaning in English:

I was waiting to see whether there were going to be any more guesses.

Not many people guess, unfortunately.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on August 14, 2013, 03:38:09 PM
I guess none of the above. I can't connect duvidar with anything.

I am such a language nerd. I love learning about different languages and how they represent the same reality so differently. Living in other cultures and learning languages has influenced my worldview bigtime. Languages affect the way people think and how they see the world.

One culture has an idea or a concept that does not even exist in another culture, so there are no mutual words for it.  One language has to borrow the word or phrase from another. Think about how many words we need in English to translate tete a tete, rendezvous, decolletage, folie a deux or menage a trois from French. The fact that French already has words for these concepts and English does not tells you something about the respective cultures.

Also, languages don't directly translate meaning, which is another factor in my atheism. For example, in Spanish there are a lot of reflexive verbs, where something does something to itself. To say the cat fell off a table, you say se cayo el gato de la mesa, which translates as "the cat dropped itself from the table." Rocks and other inanimate objects also "drop themselves". I don't know about you, but I see a different picture in my head from "it fell" to "it dropped itself".

Once the bible or other sacred text has been translated, the meaning has changed.[1] Over time, you get a telephone game effect, where people have no clue what the original meaning of a passage was. Yet, they think they can base their life decisions or country's laws on this stuff!
 1. Muslims try to prevent this by only having the Quran be sacred in Arabic, but the meaning of words changes over time even within a language or culture. What does it mean to "dress modestly"? In Saudi Arabia it means head to toe loose burkha-type covers in black or white for men and women. In Senegal it means clothes that cover the entire body but that are tight and in bright colors.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on August 15, 2013, 06:36:27 AM
I'm going to guess "to doubt", since v's and b's tend to transmute into each other in language evolution, as do d's and t's, bringing the word to "dubitar". Which seems close enough to make that leap. I don't remember what the word is in Spanish.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 15, 2013, 09:15:16 AM
jynnan tonnix wins.

I'm going to guess "to doubt", since v's and b's tend to transmute into each other in language evolution, as do d's and t's, bringing the word to "dubitar". Which seems close enough to make that leap. I don't remember what the word is in Spanish.

The word, IIRC, is "dudar" (literally: to doubt).

Next word: Copo

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 16, 2013, 03:35:54 PM
The answer was "the first and second options".

Next word: Dor

Meaning in English:

Just a note for those who still care about this game: if nobody participates in this round, I'll stop the game altogether.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on August 17, 2013, 07:52:21 AM
I like the game, but hate making mistakes! So I generally avoid answering unless I'm pretty sure I have it figured out. And even then I mess it up about half the time. It's always interesting to see what the right answer is, though.

If I had to guess, my first thought would be either a or b...it's closer to "dar", which, if I remember correctly is Spanish for  "to give", but somehow the difference in the vowel makes it feel (if that makes sense) a bit more like "dolor" (pain) even though the word itself is less similar overall...

Which, of course, probably means it's actually one of the other choices, but I can't dredge up any closely matching words for hearing and listening out of my brain. So, it could just as easily be something totally other.

Urgh! I hate decisions. Can't I just leave it with letting you in on my thought process without actually choosing anything?
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 17, 2013, 01:07:51 PM
<snip>
Urgh! I hate decisions. Can't I just leave it with letting you in on my thought process without actually choosing anything?

Fine by me. I just want to know that I'm not wasting my time with this game.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 17, 2013, 03:39:15 PM
The answer was "pain".

jynnan tonnix had a point about the word not feeling right. The Portuguese word for "to give" is "dar".

Next word: "Da"

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Quesi on August 17, 2013, 06:04:03 PM
Of the - female

Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 18, 2013, 03:55:27 PM
Quesi wins.

Of the - female



I was hoping the similarities between "dar" and "da", as well as the similarities between "da" and "dad" would throw you off. The actual word for "give (imperative, third person, singular)" is "dá" (note the accent) and the one for "give (imperative, third person, plural)" is "dêem".

Next word: Falcatrua

Meaning in English:

Try guessing this one without cheating. :P
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Quesi on August 18, 2013, 05:37:07 PM
Sorry.  I shouldn't play.  I used to speak Portuguese pretty well, but my skills have diminished over the years, and I have more Spanish interference than not.  I've been trying to stay out of the game, but I jumped at the easy one. 
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 18, 2013, 05:51:04 PM
Sorry.  I shouldn't play.  I used to speak Portuguese pretty well, but my skills have diminished over the years, and I have more Spanish interference than not.  I've been trying to stay out of the game, but I jumped at the easy one. 

Of course you should play. That's the whole point of the game. At the very least leave a message with your train of thought.
Also, that message wasn't for you specifically. It was for anyone who might participate.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 19, 2013, 06:28:34 PM
The correct answer was "a ruse". To be more precise, "falcatrua" is usually used in the context of a business ruse.

Next word: Luz

Meaning in English:

Note: I really am running out of ideas here. Send me your suggestions by PM, if you'd like to see this game go on.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on August 20, 2013, 05:11:25 AM
light. The latin for light is lux, luz is close enough for me to think this is where is came from...
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on August 20, 2013, 06:25:37 AM
I say light as well. It's the same in Spanish, and one of my favorite words/roots.

One of my favorite Spanish names, as well. Plus, I've always liked "Lucifer", even though nobody can really get away with naming a kid that (there's a thread here somewhere recently which alludes to that).

Oddly, another favorite name of mine is the Russian "Svetlana", which means the same, but, coming from a completely different root, sounds nothing like it. And I liked both names before I knew they had the same definition.

Also, sorry for not answering your previous question. You did such a good job with possible alternate definitions, and I couldn't come up with anything to grasp at as far as roots, that most of the choices seemed every bit as viable as others. Though there was something about the word which suggested trickery, and I was racking my brain to try to come up with a root or reason why it would feel that way, and narrow it down further between ruse and trickster, but never got any further.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: LoriPinkAngel on August 20, 2013, 12:25:06 PM
I would enjoy seeing sentences with the words and translations when you give the correct answers.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 20, 2013, 12:29:24 PM
Plus, I've always liked "Lucifer", even though nobody can really get away with naming a kid that (there's a thread here somewhere recently which alludes to that).

I also like the name "Lucifer". I even considered changing my name to that at one point, but, as you said, it's not allowed. Fucking christians and their false beliefs. I don't see what's wrong with being called "Lightbringer".
On a related note, I had a t-shirt made a while ago. It's white, with a perfect four-point star (upright, similar to a plus sign) on the front, around my sternum, angel wings on the back (where wings usually are on an angel), and the phrase "Fallen Angel; Bringer of Light" on the back, at the bottom. It's my favorite shirt.

I would enjoy seeing sentences with the words and translations when you give the correct answers.

I'll take that into consideration.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 21, 2013, 05:43:34 AM
Everyone wins.

light. The latin for light is lux, luz is close enough for me to think this is where is came from...

I say light as well. It's the same in Spanish, and one of my favorite words/roots.

Sentence: Que luz brilhante!
Translation: What a bright light!

Next Word: Pastor

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: LoriPinkAngel on August 21, 2013, 11:37:37 AM
My guess is the 1st & 2nd options since I'm assuming Pastor does refer to a Pastor & recalling the term "pastoral" as referring to pasture like places where sheep may be leads me to include sheppard.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on August 21, 2013, 12:09:29 PM
My thinking was more or less the same as Lori's. I was going to say that it seems pretty feasible that it would include the word for priest, but then thought that, no, you had said "Father", which is a title rather than a position, and from a different root (probably something like Padre). Which got me going on all sorts of tangents.

The whole shepherd thing goes back to Jesus and leading of flocks anyway. And a priest and pastor, as well as ministers, vicars, and all manner of other titles all fall under that umbrella, but while they may be synonymous in that case, and might also be addressed as "Father" in some cases (not sure which denominations do this, but I'm pretty sure it's not limited to Catholics), that does not make Father and Shepherd the same thing etymologically speaking.

So I'll agree with Lori on options one and two.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 24, 2013, 09:42:55 AM
Sorry for the delay. Everyone wins.

Sentence: "Um pastor toma sempre conta do seu rebanho."
Translation: "A sheppard always looks after his flock."

Next word: Antepenúltima

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on August 24, 2013, 12:04:58 PM
Well, penultimate means second to last, and the prefix "ante" means before, and the "a" ending indicates feminine, so I'd say third to the last (female).
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 25, 2013, 02:05:55 PM
Well, penultimate means second to last, and the prefix "ante" means before, and the "a" ending indicates feminine, so I'd say third to the last (female).

You've been learning. You are correct.
Sorry for the delay, but I was playing laser tag with some friends of mine.

Next word: Mano

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 25, 2013, 04:28:12 PM
Well, penultimate means second to last, and the prefix "ante" means before, and the "a" ending indicates feminine, so I'd say third to the last (female).

You've been learning. You are correct.
Sorry for the delay, but I was playing laser tag with some friends of mine.

Next word: Mano

Meaning in English:
  • Hand
  • Brother
  • Bro (as in the diminutive of brother)
  • Man (as in the opposite of woman)
  • The second and third options
  • None of the above

Bold mine. There was a small typo in my previous post. Ignore that and focus on this one.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on August 26, 2013, 10:17:00 PM
Bro, as in a short form of hermano.
 
(Just got back from a country where I spoke espanol for a week, so I am up to speed!)
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on August 27, 2013, 06:30:34 AM
Next word: Mano

Meaning in English:
  • Hand
  • Brother
  • Bro (as in the diminutive of brother)
  • Man (as in the opposite of woman)
  • The second and third options
  • None of the above

ok so working with;
Rule of thumb:
Words ending in "-o" tend to be male, and words ending in "-a" tend to be female.
I can rule out 1.
I don't think it would be 3 based on the assumption that the rule of thumb above applies to non-diminuitive words, this also rules out 5.
Man in spanish is hombre( something like that) I assume that the Portuguese is similar (as most words are)
So I'm going for 2 "brother"...
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on August 27, 2013, 07:08:38 AM
It's identical to the word for hand in related languages, so despite the off chance that it's another one of those "false friends", that's what I'm going with.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 27, 2013, 07:55:11 AM
nogodsforme wins.

Bro, as in a short form of hermano.
 
(Just got back from a country where I spoke espanol for a week, so I am up to speed!)

I selected the word "mano" precisely because of its similarity to the Spanish "mano" (hand).

Sentence: Este é o menu mano.
Translation: This is my bro.

Next word: Rapariga

Meaning in English:

I'd really like for you guys to send your requests to me; otherwise I might have to stop this game, since I can't come up with anything interesting.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on August 27, 2013, 08:36:39 AM
Cool. I hadn't noticed Nogodsforme's answer, otherwise I'd have probably agreed. That would kinda be cheating, though. 

Out of curiosity, though, what is the Portugese word for hand?

And, by the way, your questions so far have all been interesting, whether you think so or not. I'll try to come up with another one in Polish to mix things up a bit as well.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 27, 2013, 08:38:13 AM
Cool. I hadn't noticed Nogodsforme's answer, otherwise I'd have probably agreed. That would kinda be cheating, though. 

Out of curiosity, though, what is the Portugese word for hand?

Mão (singular) and mãos (plural). It's also female.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 28, 2013, 05:12:21 PM
Nobody entered, but the answer was "girl" (as in the opposite of "boy"). In Brazil, "rapariga" also means "prostitute"/"whore", but not here.

Sentence: Que rapariga gira.
Translation: What a cute girl.

Next word: Victória

Meaning in English:

I didn't include many options because I honestly couldn't think of other similar words.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on August 29, 2013, 06:50:29 AM
Nobody entered, but the answer was "girl" (as in the opposite of "boy"). In Brazil, "rapariga" also means "prostitute"/"whore", but not here.

Sentence: Que rapariga gira.
Translation: What a cute girl.

Next word: Victória

Meaning in English:
  • Victory
  • Victoria
  • None of the above

I didn't include many options because I honestly couldn't think of other similar words.

I thought I had entered the last one. i was going to go with girl - honest the reason being the word ended with an "a" and the others are non gender specific.

Anyway nest one.

its got to be victoria its just too close not to be...
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on August 29, 2013, 11:41:48 AM
It seems that it would be Victory, but if that was the case, then most probably the name "Victoria" (which is what I am assuming you mean with choice #2), would be the same word (vs "Victory" and "Victoria" being different in English). Unless the word for Victory is something else. But just as I messed up with "mano", I can't imagine a word which sounds so similar in so many languages all of a sudden becoming something rather unfamiliar in Portugese. Though, obviously, that can and does happen.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 29, 2013, 05:11:38 PM
Everyone loses. Mrjason was close, but there's something I learned in my English classes that I'll share with you: names are not translatable. If your name is "Hélio", for example, like mine, you are still called "Hélio" in every language on or off the planet, regardless of whatever equivalents the name might have in those languages. In other words, the answer was "None of the above". I had hoped that the fact that I've included that option for the past few games would throw you off, and I'm guessing it did.

Next word: Bife

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on August 29, 2013, 05:31:12 PM
Everyone loses. Mrjason was close, but there's something I learned in my English classes that I'll share with you: names are not translatable. If your name is "Hélio", for example, like mine, you are still called "Hélio" in every language on or off the planet, regardless of whatever equivalents the name might have in those languages. In other words, the answer was "None of the above". I had hoped that the fact that I've included that option for the past few games would throw you off, and I'm guessing it did.


I was actually going to guess "none of the above", actually, just for that reason, but ultimately decided that the word simply HAD to either be a name, or mean victory. What does it mean, by the way? You didn't include that in your response.

As far as names being non-translatable, yes, I know that. I guess my response got convoluted, though. The point I was making was that there are a whole lot of languages out there in which Victor or Victoria are common names (even in Polish, which has different roots for the most part; I have an uncle Wiktor), and the meaning of the name goes back to the word for Victory. So it just seemed like too big of a stretch for the Portugese language to have the word Victoria in it, and it not be either a name or the word for Victory.

That's probably still pretty convoluted. I'll shut up now :)

As far as the next word, I'm pretty sure it's Beef (the meat), but totally uncertain whether it would also be a word for steak. I'll just go with beef, though.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 29, 2013, 05:36:56 PM
What does it mean, by the way? You didn't include that in your response.

"Victória" is the Portuguese equivalent of "Victoria". "Vitória" (note the lack of a "c" before the t) means "victory".
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on August 30, 2013, 05:39:16 AM
Thanks.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on August 30, 2013, 06:38:49 AM
Everyone loses. Mrjason was close, but there's something I learned in my English classes that I'll share with you: names are not translatable. If your name is "Hélio", for example, like mine, you are still called "Hélio" in every language on or off the planet, regardless of whatever equivalents the name might have in those languages. In other words, the answer was "None of the above". I had hoped that the fact that I've included that option for the past few games would throw you off, and I'm guessing it did.

Next word: Bife

Meaning in English:
  • Beef (meat)
  • Steak
  • Stake
  • The first and second options
  • The first, second and third options
  • None of the above

Ah should have known that about names.

I do think I know this next answer though

I'm going for Steak. reason being I was on holiday in albufeira last year and I'm sure this was what I ordered. I know frango too, I went to Mr Frango's frango hut :)
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 31, 2013, 06:35:20 AM
Mrjason wins.

I'm going for Steak.

"Bife" is pronounced almost like "beef", but, in fact, means "steak". It is yet another "false friend".

Sentence: Este bife é muito bom.
Translation: This steak is very good.

Next word: À

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on September 02, 2013, 06:42:51 PM
To. Again with the espanol.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on September 02, 2013, 06:56:00 PM
Everyone loses. The correct answer is "to the". The word "à" is a contraction of "a" and "a"; the first "a" meaning "to" and the second meaning "the". Here's a sentence my grandmother taught me when she explained it to me:
Sentence: Eu estou a ir à escola.
Translation: I am going to (the) school.
In English, sometimes the "the" is omitted, as is the case in my example.

Next word: Fogo

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on September 03, 2013, 06:25:36 AM
I would guess "fire", based on the similarity to the Spanish "fuego". Though it may very well be an idiomatic term for "damn" as well, such as one might swear by saying "hellfire!" or some such.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on September 03, 2013, 11:22:08 PM
^^^I agree. Fire.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on September 04, 2013, 03:40:47 AM
I think alcohol is the same as the english so I'm ruling that out.
I'm going for 1st and second options as it seems logical that they could be interchangeable...
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on September 04, 2013, 04:31:02 AM
Mrjason wins.

I think alcohol is the same as the english so I'm ruling that out.
I'm going for 1st and second options as it seems logical that they could be interchangeable...

Sentence: Fogo é o elemento favorito do Um Acima de Todos.
Translation: Fire is the One Above All's favorite element.
Note: "One Above All" can mean both "Um Acima de Todos" and "Um Sobre Todos". I picked one at random, as I could not decide between them. And yes, I know names aren't translatable. I'm just letting you know what the Portuguese equivalent would be.
The difference between "Sobre" and "Acima de" is simple. "Acima de" (usually) implies that one is physically above something/someone else, but not placed on top of something/someone else. "Sobre" (usually) means that it's physically on top of something/someone else; literally placed on something else. However, in this context, there is no difference (that I'm aware of).
As for "alcohol", the Portuguese word is "álcool".

Next word: Cigarra

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on September 04, 2013, 05:16:06 AM
Before I answer the question can you clarify something for me please?

Can you tell me when you are supposed to use obrigado instead of obrigada? (NB not sure of spelling but it means "thanks")

I undersand now that words with "o" are male and "a" are female. But is it the person who is saying it or the person that you are saying it to that changes the gender of the word?

I.e. would I as a man always say obrigado?

This confused the hell out of me on holiday as I seemed to get it wrong whichever way I tried.

Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on September 04, 2013, 05:23:24 AM
You say "obrigado" if you're a man and "obrigada" if you're a woman.
Also, not every word ending in "o" is male, and not every word ending in "a" is female. It's a general "rule", which is not always true.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on September 04, 2013, 06:14:32 AM
cheers man.

As you're reminging me that the "o"/"a" is a gerneral rule I'm going to guess cigar (male) for the next one...
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on September 05, 2013, 12:10:37 PM
Everyone loses. The correct answer was "Cicada". I'll give an explanation after the new word.

Next word: Cigarro

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on September 05, 2013, 06:27:54 PM
I was going to guess cicada, but I only know it because of the Linda Ronstadt version of the mariachi song. If you have not heard it, ya gotta. Man has that girl got the pipes. This is not the best recording, but it is in front of a Mexican audience, which should count for something. (She is Mexican-American, para que no sabe.)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dX8kNnk0jfw
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on September 05, 2013, 07:30:43 PM
I just read the other day that she can no longer sing at all due to Parkinson's disease. So sad. I always loved her voice.

As for the word, I was going to guess cigarette (male), mostly because given all the trickiness in the questions, cigar just seemed TOO close, and I think I recall seeing cigarettes labeled as something akin to "cigarros" in Spanish somewhere along the line, though my memory may be faulty. I was also tempted to go all the way in the other direction and guess cicada, but the word in Portugese is just way too close to the whole cigar/cigarette genre, and I'm not sure there is enough obvious similarity between the bugs and smoking implements, so I'll forego that.

But given my record on this thread of late, I'm probably entirely wrong...
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on September 06, 2013, 03:25:47 PM
The correct answer was "Cigarette", both male and female.

Now for the explanation I promised:
"Cigarra", while very similar to "Cigarro", has no connection to it that I'm aware of, other than the spelling and phonetic ones.
"Cigarra" is female, whereas "Cigarro" is male, as indicated by the "a" and "o", respectively.

Sentence: Esta cigarra é muito barulhenta.
Translation: This cicada is very noisy.

Sentence: Cigarros matam.
Translation: Cigarettes kill.

Next word: Realístico

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on September 06, 2013, 03:45:53 PM
Ah, darnit...that's what I meant to say. At least, I am assuming that Portugese is like other languages in which there is a masculine and a feminine form of the noun for things which have a masculine and feminine form, but since cigarettes (and other inanimate objects) have no sexual definition, there is only one form of the noun, which may be either masculine or feminine, but does not actually mean the object is either. Thus, the noun "cigarro" is masculine, but it would serve for both. Or something like that?
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on September 06, 2013, 03:53:39 PM
Ah, darnit...that's what I meant to say. At least, I am assuming that Portugese is like other languages in which there is a masculine and a feminine form of the noun for things which have a masculine and feminine form, but since cigarettes (and other inanimate objects) have no sexual definition, there is only one form of the noun, which may be either masculine or feminine, but does not actually mean the object is either. Thus, the noun "cigarro" is masculine, but it would serve for both. Or something like that?

Everything you said was correct, right up until the end. "Cigarro" is masculine, but, since there's no feminine for "cigarette", it can't serve for both, since there's no "both".
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on September 06, 2013, 06:55:02 PM
That's what was confusing me about the correct answer, though...you said it was "Cigarette, both male and female", but since there is no "both", it cannot be both. But the correct answer is also not "cigarette, male", since there is no such thing. So what is the correct answer? Sorry, I'm still confused.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on September 07, 2013, 08:52:13 AM
That's what was confusing me about the correct answer, though...you said it was "Cigarette, both male and female", but since there is no "both", it cannot be both. But the correct answer is also not "cigarette, male", since there is no such thing. So what is the correct answer? Sorry, I'm still confused.

You're right. I meant that "cigarro" means "cigarette", but has no gender. I see now that it was horribly phrased, as it inferred otherwise, especially given what I said about not having a gender. My apologies.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: LoriPinkAngel on September 07, 2013, 03:17:59 PM
So, then I will guess realistico is realistic both male & female    :o
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on September 07, 2013, 05:54:34 PM
The correct answer was "None of the above", as "realístico" isn't a Portuguese word. The actual word you're looking for is "realista" (realistic), and it is genderless.

Next word: Autocarro

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on September 08, 2013, 07:47:29 PM
Bus. Like autobus.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on September 09, 2013, 10:04:52 AM
nogodsforme wins.

Bus. Like autobus.

Sentence: Os autocarros deviam chegar sempre a horas.
Translation: Buses should always arrive on time.

Next word: No

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on September 09, 2013, 02:33:43 PM
Portuguese is freaking weird, but all languages have logic. Even Klingon. ;D
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on September 10, 2013, 08:50:30 AM


Next word: No

Meaning in English:
  • In the
  • On the
  • No
  • The first and second options
  • None of the above

Hmmm. I'm reluctant to go with 3 as it seems too easy, plus in other european languages although "No" is similar its not exactly the same.
Could 1 word be the same as 2 words in english? Possible. German is great for that. And NGFM is tricky so I suspect he'll try to confuse us  ;)

Conclusion; Errr. not sure. I'll guess at 4 - the 1st and second options.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on September 10, 2013, 11:17:14 AM
And NGFM is tricky so I suspect he'll try to confuse us  ;)

Either you meant "OAA" or you meant "she'll".

Anyway, Mrjason wins.

I'll guess at 4 - the 1st and second options.

"No" is a contraction of "em" and "o". "Em" can mean both "in" and "on", depending on the context, whereas "o" means "the" (male).
Also, I forgot to state in the answers that "No" is male.

Next word: Rato

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on September 10, 2013, 11:38:21 AM
I believe that the Spanish "raton" means "mouse" rather than "rat", so I'll hazard a guess that it's similar in Portugese. And given that a computer mouse is probably called the equivalent of that in a lot of other languages (I mean, just look at the thing...), I will guess that it's probably known by that name to at least a percentage of Portugese speakers. So, the second and third options.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on September 11, 2013, 03:45:53 AM
And NGFM is tricky so I suspect he'll try to confuse us  ;)

Either you meant "OAA" or you meant "she'll".


I ment OAA. Apologies. Thats the problem with being online at work, I get distracted...
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on September 11, 2013, 09:56:40 AM
Hmmm. An "o" on the end. I'll apply the rule of thumb (and probably be wrong) in saying that the animals mentioned are non gender specific so I'll go for 5 - none of the above
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on September 11, 2013, 05:17:40 PM
jynnan tonnix wins.

So, the second and third options.

"Rato", while similar to "rat", actually means "mouse", both the animal and the computer hardware. The Portuguese word for "rat" is "ratazana". I wouldn't call this a "false friend", but others might.

Next word: Saudades

Meaning in English:

It's a short list this time, and I suspect many of you will guess correctly, but not for the proper reason(s).
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on September 11, 2013, 06:34:43 PM
Solitary? None of the above.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on September 12, 2013, 05:17:57 PM
nogodsforme wins.

None of the above.

From what I've heard (and note that I cannot[1] verify this, as it would take time I can't/won't spare), "saudades" has no direct translation to any language whatsoever. It's a uniquely Portuguese term. Here's a sentence that should help you understand its meaning better.

Sentence: Eu tenho saudades dele.
Translation: I miss him.

"Saudades" is basically the feeling you get when you miss someone. It's not exactly the verb "to miss", but, if I had to translate the term, that would be it.

Next word: Manga

Meaning in English:
 1. Or will not.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on September 13, 2013, 07:12:31 AM
I like to think I'm quite good at recognising Portuguese food words and I think this is 1 - Mango.

I'm probably going to be proven lacking in my food word knowledge now :(
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on September 13, 2013, 07:31:37 AM
I'm pretty sure, again, that this is either similar or the same as the Spanish word for sleeve...which may or may not mean it translates to sleeve in Portugese, but if nothing else, these exercises are dredging a lot of old Spanish vocabulary words up out of my memory banks. Anyway, I'll go with that, my feeling being that even if a word is not necessarily identical in a related language, the gender of the noun would probably stay the same, and "mango" would be a masculine noun, where "manga" would be feminine.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on September 13, 2013, 04:43:09 PM
Sleeve.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on September 13, 2013, 10:15:11 PM
Ha. Maybe one of these days I will be confident enough to give a one-word answer to a question rather than feeling the need to build a thesis around it. At least you came up with the same answer I did. I feel a little bit better now.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on September 14, 2013, 08:08:19 AM
The correct answer was "the first and second options".

Next word: Detectar

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on September 14, 2013, 01:41:01 PM
I'd go with "to detect"...it feels like a verb form. And I'd suspect that detector would be something more akin to "detectador" .
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on September 15, 2013, 05:12:54 AM
jynnan tonnix wins.

I'd go with "to detect"...it feels like a verb form. And I'd suspect that detector would be something more akin to "detectador" .

I was thinking about using "detector" instead of "detectar", since the former is more similar to its English translation: "detector".

Next word: Concrecto

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on September 17, 2013, 11:05:48 AM
The answer was "Concrete (the adjective)". The word for the substance is "betão".

Next word: Lixado

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on September 17, 2013, 01:35:19 PM
Polished, as in smooth.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: epidemic on September 17, 2013, 02:09:48 PM
It is often said that Americans lack the ability to speak foreign languages.  This is in large part because there is simply little to be gained from the effort to learn different language.  Especially through the 19th and 20th centuries.  As an American I could travel much of the world and do business virtually anywhere with out the need to speak another languange.  We have a huge geographic area where there simply is no benefit to speaking a 2nd or 3rd language.  Were I to live in Europe, in the 20th century I would need to speak english and for ease of travel 500 miles in any direction I probably would do well to speak another language. 

I don't fault anyone for speaking multiple languages but During the years I was in school it would have been wasted effort to learn another language.

To be polite during my trip to Germany I did spend a week learning polite german and "Wo ist die Toilette" type of stuff.  If I were to live in Germany there is no way that I would ever try with out learing German.  I find it offensive that people live out their lives in America with out the courtesy of learning the primary language.  My great grandfather saw to it that his children and family spoke the language of their addopted land.  Besides being polite it is also critical to success.

Rant off :)

With America fast becoming just another player in the world I am having my children learn foreign languages.  It is the wise thing to do,  just as it is the wise thing for kids in Europe to learn languages for success.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: epidemic on September 17, 2013, 02:18:46 PM
The answer was "Concrete (the adjective)". The word for the substance is "betão".

Next word: Lixado

Meaning in English:
  • Screwed
  • Fucked
  • Polished
  • The first and second options
  • The first, second and third options
  • None of the above


I would go for polished or sanded.  Eu lixado a minha madeira.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on September 18, 2013, 07:09:24 AM
It brings to mind words which imply a smoothness (lissome, glissade) which it may or may not be related to, but feels as though it might. So I would say polished as well....though come to think of it, there is a certain smooth and polishing movement to the other choices.

I don't know whether you mean "screw" in the literal sense, though, or as a synonym for "fuck", or whether they do, in fact, translate as synonyms in Portugese as well. If they do, I would be tempted to say all three options, but otherwise will just go with polished.

 
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on September 18, 2013, 01:16:40 PM
The answer was "The first, second and third options".
"Lixado" can mean that either something was "lixado/a" (more or less: someone scrubbed it with sandpaper), or it can mean "screwed". While it is uncommon, it can also be translated to "fucked", although "fucked" is usually translated as "fodido/a".

Next word: Cadeira

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on September 18, 2013, 01:26:34 PM
I have no clue on that one.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on September 18, 2013, 01:28:38 PM
I would go for polished or sanded.  Eu lixado a minha madeira.

The proper verb tense in that sentence is "lixo" (I sand my wood), unless you meant "I had/have sanded my wood", in which case you're missing the "to have" auxiliary verb.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on September 19, 2013, 02:48:00 PM
The correct answer was "The first and second options". When used in a school context, "cadeira" usually refers to a college class.

Next word: Raro

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on September 19, 2013, 04:49:22 PM
Weird, male.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on September 21, 2013, 09:35:49 AM
The correct answer was "Rare (male)".

"Raro", while similar to the Spanish "raro", means "rare", and is a male term.

Next word: Narciso

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on September 21, 2013, 10:16:53 AM
since the flower is part and parcel of the myth, I'll say both.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on September 22, 2013, 06:14:02 PM
I'll go out on a limb and say none of they above. A narciso is a man who uses illicit substances while wearing women's clothing and looking at himself the mirror. Or while taking selfies on his phone.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on September 23, 2013, 07:16:06 AM
But aside from the illicit substances, and possibly the women's clothing (is that a necessary component?), the man gazing at his reflection and taking selfies would fall under the narcissist label in English as well. And it seems that in any case, the etymology would be the same. That's where I get confused, sometimes, because as languages evolve, a word which, even in the not-so-distant past might have been more or less synonymous with a similar word in another language, it has come to have another, more specific definition since, and ended up as a whole different animal.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on September 23, 2013, 04:00:18 PM
The correct answer was either "Narcissus (the plant)" or "None of the above". Let me explain:
Until very recently, I was unaware that "Narciso" was also the Portuguese name for "Narcissus". I was only aware of the plant.

Next word: Arma

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Quesi on September 23, 2013, 07:36:19 PM
Pretty sure it is second and third. 
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on September 26, 2013, 01:59:14 PM
Quesi wins.

Pretty sure it is second and third. 

Next word: Azedo

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on September 26, 2013, 02:59:26 PM
No idea, but on the assumption that it's something to do with being rotten and spoiled, do words of that kind get applied to bratty children as well?
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on September 26, 2013, 03:08:19 PM
No idea, but on the assumption that it's something to do with being rotten and spoiled, do words of that kind get applied to bratty children as well?

I can't answer that without giving away the answer.
NOTE: I fixed the penultimate possible answer.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on September 26, 2013, 09:51:22 PM
Didn't think you could, but you can let us know after the answer is revealed.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on September 27, 2013, 08:29:37 AM
number 3...

acidus is latin for sour, spoiled (i think) is derived from sour, Azedo (possibly) comes from acidus and it has an "o" on the end...

Hmmm... tenuous much :)
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on September 29, 2013, 12:37:29 PM
The correct answer was "The first and third options".

"Azedo" is mostly used for (male) liquids, whereas "podre" is used for (male and female) solids. Although, technically, they can be used interchangeably, it won't sound right to most native speakers.

Next word: Fã

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on October 03, 2013, 02:35:14 AM
Just posting to see if I get any replies before I move on to the next word.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on October 03, 2013, 03:44:56 AM
Hadn't seen the new word!

As "Fan" is a contraction of fanatic I don't think it is number 2. I'm ruling out 3 as I think that is an americanism.

So 1 it is...

Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on October 03, 2013, 06:24:47 AM
I missed the new word as well...

I don't think "Fa" as the musical note is an Americanism. I've heard it in other languages as well.

There's not an option for only 1 being the right answer, neither is there one for only 3 being correct, and as you say, it doesn't make sense for "fan" as a contraction of fanatic to be the right answer either, so I'm going with "none of the above"
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on October 03, 2013, 06:28:37 AM
There's not an option for only 1 being the right answer, neither is there one for only 3 being correct

Yes there is, for both of them. Each option is an individual answer. If you want to say that just the first option is correct, simply say "the first option is correct". If you want a combination of the individual answers, you're going to have to choose from the combinations listed. If the correct answer is a combo of the individual answers, then one of the combos I provide will be correct. All this, of course, is assuming I don't make a mistake.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on October 03, 2013, 06:43:01 AM
Ah...ok, I misunderstood.

I'll go with option 3, then. It probably could be option 1, but I have no idea of the etymology of fan as a cooling device, and I just feel like going the musical route instead :)
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on October 03, 2013, 06:47:49 AM
Didn't think you could, but you can let us know after the answer is revealed.


I almost forgot about this. "Azedo" is not used in any expression regarding people, as far as I know. "Podre" is used in "podre de rico" ("filthy rich"), but that's it, AFAIK.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on October 04, 2013, 03:40:35 PM
The correct answer was "Fan (as in someone who likes something)".
The word for "fa" (also called "F") is "fá", and the word for "fan" is "ventoinha".

Next word: Rápido

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on October 04, 2013, 04:54:21 PM
Quickly, male.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on October 06, 2013, 05:22:21 PM
Second trap you've fallen for, nogodsforme. :P
"Rápido", in Portuguese, means "quick (male)". "Quickly" is "rapidamente".
The suffix "-mente" is the Portuguese equivalent of the suffix "-ly". Also, words with the suffix "-mente" never have acute accents.

Next word: Cartão

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on October 06, 2013, 06:59:28 PM
Uhhh. Carton? My language mojo is blown.... :P
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on October 08, 2013, 11:10:35 AM
The correct answer was "The first and second options".
"Cartão" is used for both cards (in which case we say "Um cartão"[1], or "O cartão"[2]) and cardboard (simply "Cartão", without any articles).
Don't feel bad, nogodsforme. I know the English, Portuguese and Spanish languages well enough to be able to trick you.

Next word: Do

Meaning in English:
 1. One/A card
 2. The card
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on October 08, 2013, 11:17:54 AM
I think first and second options, I'm sure thats what it is in spanish and I'm guessing its similar in portuguese
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on October 13, 2013, 01:43:33 PM
The correct answer was "Of the". "Do" is a contraction of "de" and "o", where "de" means "of" and "o" means "the (male)". I omitted the male/female answers for the sake of brevity, but I'll try to include them when possible from now on.

Next word: Ganga

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on October 18, 2013, 01:56:20 PM
Just trying to see if I can get some guesses before moving on to the next word.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on October 19, 2013, 04:25:33 PM
Ganga as in marijuana?
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on October 20, 2013, 04:52:37 AM
The correct answer was "The fourth and fifth options".
Ganga is mostly used for "denim", but it can also be used for gangue. There is no direct translation for the word "jeans". We call them "calças de ganga" (literally: denim pants).

Bonus round: What gender is "ganga"?
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on October 20, 2013, 04:30:40 PM
Trying logic, I will guess male gender, pants being more male attire?
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on October 21, 2013, 07:26:22 AM
Female, it ends in an "a"
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on October 21, 2013, 07:58:51 AM
Mrjason wins.

Female, it ends in an "a"

Next word: Duche

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on October 21, 2013, 10:57:55 AM
shower. is my immediate thought. but thats french isn't it? Maybe its the same.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on October 21, 2013, 10:59:20 AM
Mrjason wins.

Female, it ends in an "a"


And hell yeah, I've learned a rule of thumb about a language! never expected that here.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: LoriPinkAngel on October 21, 2013, 11:51:32 AM
shower. is my immediate thought. but thats french isn't it? Maybe its the same.

I'm back, and I thought the exact same thing on this word.  So if it's right I guess we tie MrJ.   :D
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on October 21, 2013, 12:11:53 PM
I thought the same, but didn't get a chance to respond.

As for the next word (duche), my guess would be shower.

It is kind of similar to the Polish word for "soul", as well, but I very much doubt they are etymologically connected.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Quesi on October 22, 2013, 08:06:19 AM
May I throw in a slightly different version of the game?

I'd like to give several Spanish words for a common item.  Different countries have vastly different words for this same item.

Here are some of the words:

Popote
Pitillo
Sorbete
Bombillo
Canita
Pajilla

What is the English word for this item?
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on October 22, 2013, 12:50:50 PM
May I throw in a slightly different version of the game?
<snip>

Sure.

<snip>
What is the English word for this item?

My guess would be "sorbet".
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Quesi on October 22, 2013, 04:49:27 PM

My guess would be "sorbet".

Good guess.  But that is not it.  I left off the word that (I'm pretty sure) they use in Spain.  But if I'm right about the word they use in Spain, the last one on the list is close to it.

Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on October 23, 2013, 04:14:59 AM
May I throw in a slightly different version of the game?

I'd like to give several Spanish words for a common item.  Different countries have vastly different words for this same item.

Here are some of the words:

Popote
Pitillo
Sorbete
Bombillo
Canita
Pajilla

What is the English word for this item?

I think Sorbete is a plastic drinking straw. but Isn't Pitillo a cigarette?
I'm not sure. cigs or straws is my answer.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Quesi on October 23, 2013, 11:42:56 AM
MrJason wins with drinking straw.

All of these words mean straw in different parts of the Americas. I've never seen the word pitillo used to describe a cigarette, but they are both narrow things that one sucks on.  So is canita, like sugar cane. 

I'm pretty sure the word in Spain is paja. 

But things that came into existence after the colonization of the Americas usually share some sort of commercial name or scientific name, like televisor or astronaut.

Not really sure how each of these words developed so independently.  Maybe each society had a name for something that they used in the way a straw was used, and when plastic straws were invented and distributed, each region stuck with the name that they had used earlier. 
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on October 23, 2013, 12:54:09 PM

I'm pretty sure the word in Spain is paja. 


The Polish word for a pipe (as in smoking a pipe) is fajka...and even though they are pronounced very differently (fai-ka vs pa-ha), they appear to me to have some etymological similarity as p's and f's are among those letters which tend to mutate into each other.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on October 23, 2013, 04:30:34 PM
Let me jump in with the espanol; what's a guagua?
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Quesi on October 23, 2013, 05:32:00 PM
Let me jump in with the espanol; what's a guagua?

I googled images looking for a controversial sign that was advertising beer during the PR Day Parade in NYC.  Didn't find it, but I found this one. 
(http://sd.keepcalm-o-matic.co.uk/i/keep-calm-and-coge-la-guagua-1.png)

This is something you would NEVER SAY in Mexico
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on October 24, 2013, 07:51:14 AM
Everyone who entered wins.

Next word: Idiota

This is a simple round so I can make you guess the word's gender in the next round.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on October 25, 2013, 11:20:04 AM
Trying to see if I get some replies before moving on to the bonus round.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on October 25, 2013, 06:59:26 PM
Idiot. Masculine, of course. As if.  &)
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on October 27, 2013, 05:42:27 AM
nogodsforme wins.

Idiot.

Bonus round:
What's the gender of "idiota"?
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on October 28, 2013, 08:28:11 AM
the "a" makes it female...
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on October 28, 2013, 02:30:07 PM
the "a" makes it female...

...but the "idiot" makes it male. [ducks rotten fruta volando]
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on November 04, 2013, 06:28:56 AM
Sorry for the delay. I thought I had posted the next word, but then I remembered the forum crashed or something, so I couldn't post it.

"Idiota" is genderless. We can say "um idiota" (one [male] idiot), or "uma idiota" (one [female] idiot).

Next word: Papa

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on November 04, 2013, 04:22:38 PM
Pope, if it has the masculine article. Potato if it has the feminine article. Hah!
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on November 05, 2013, 08:46:32 AM
I think pope as well. I've heard him called papa in other languages, i think the root is latin from pater
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on November 06, 2013, 12:57:05 PM
Any more guesses? I have three words all set up and ready to be posted, but I'd like for some more guesses before I move on.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on November 06, 2013, 02:03:08 PM
I'm pretty sure of "Pope", but would hazard a guess that it might mean baby food as well. After all, what's a language without a good set up for some really bad puns?

Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on November 07, 2013, 04:06:27 AM
jynnan tonnix wins.

I'm pretty sure of "Pope", but would hazard a guess that it might mean baby food as well. After all, what's a language without a good set up for some really bad puns?

After giving it some thought, I think "porridge" might've been a better translation, rather than "baby food", but "papa" is usually used for baby food, rather than any kind of porridge.

Next word: As

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on November 08, 2013, 12:21:01 PM
No guesses?
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on November 08, 2013, 03:44:58 PM
The 6th and 7th options.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on November 12, 2013, 05:39:56 AM
The fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh options

because this is an option...
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on November 12, 2013, 07:05:45 AM
I would guess "the", plural female.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on November 12, 2013, 10:48:29 AM
jynnan tonnix wins (again).

I would guess "the", plural female.

The singular form of "as" is "a", which usually means "the (female)". The word for "ace" (the card) is "ás".

Next word: Ou

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on November 12, 2013, 01:03:24 PM

The singular form of "as" is "a", which usually means "the (female)". The word for "ace" (the card) is "ás".



Is there a difference in pronunciation? I was going to have the playing card as one of my choices, but there was no option for "second and seventh" (or whatever it was) choices, so I figured I'd stick to a single choice, as none of the other multiples seemed to be right.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on November 12, 2013, 01:08:18 PM
Is there a difference in pronunciation?

Indeed there is. The acute accent (´) makes it so you put more emphasis on the "a". "Ás" is roughly pronounced "ah-shh", whereas "as" is roughly "uh-shh".
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on November 12, 2013, 02:10:50 PM
Thanks :) I was wondering how an emphasis would change with a word of only two letters. I'm trying to say it according to your note, and finding it hard to make it feel right in my mouth, but I don't know a whole lot about the sound of Portugese on the whole. Is the "s" sound always pronounced with that "shh" feeling to it, and how does it differ from the "sh" sound in English? Sorry to keep asking all these questions, I'm just curious.

 It's like in Polish, where "sz" is pronounced more or less like the English "sh", but there's another sound, an "s" with a little accent mark over it, which is pronounced similarly, but with the tongue a little more relaxed, and the air going over the top of it rather than more along the front. English speakers always seem to have a hard time even differentiating between the sounds, though, to say nothing of trying to duplicate them. I wonder if this is something similar?
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on November 12, 2013, 03:18:08 PM
Thanks :)

You're welcome.

Is the "s" sound always pronounced with that "shh" feeling to it, and how does it differ from the "sh" sound in English?

It can be pronounced as "z" if it's in the middle of a word between two vowels, "sh"/"shh"[1] if it's in the end of a word or (usually) before another consonant, or "ss" if it's two s's together or at the beginning of a word. Random: The letter "x" is more complicated. It can be "sh"/"shh", "z", or "ks", and there's no way to know which to use unless you have good instinct.

Sorry to keep asking all these questions, I'm just curious.

That's what this thread is for. I want you to learn more about one of my favorite languages.
 1. I don't know what the difference is. Mind enlightening me?
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on November 13, 2013, 08:13:45 PM
Or. Don't confuse me with that French "where".
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: ThatZenoGuy on November 15, 2013, 10:05:24 AM
*just a quick zip in, and out*

Kawaii Desune!

What does it mean? ;D
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on November 18, 2013, 05:17:51 AM
difficult one. errm. perhaps "where" i'm just guessing really
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on November 21, 2013, 03:51:58 PM
nogodsforme wins.

Or. Don't confuse me with that French "where".

That was precisely my intention. :P
EDIT: Almost forgot:
In Portuguese, there's no direct translation for "either". We have "either one" ("qualquer um"), but we use "ou" where you would use "either". Put simply:
"Either one or the other." = "Ou um ou o outro."

Next word: Lanche

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on November 22, 2013, 04:33:01 PM
None of the above. Some kind of spear, like "lance".
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on November 27, 2013, 09:20:51 AM
None of the above. Some kind of spear, like "lance".

It's definitely food based.

it could be lunch or snack. I'm fairly sure it's not used interchangeably for both.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on November 28, 2013, 06:48:07 AM
nogodsforme wins... sort of.

None of the above. Some kind of spear, like "lance".

"Lanche" has no direct translation to English that I'm aware of, but it is food related, as Mrjason said. It is a (usually light) meal between lunch and dinner.

Next word: Que

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on December 01, 2013, 08:52:44 AM
Just waiting for more replies.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: ThatZenoGuy on December 01, 2013, 07:02:58 PM
Que, also known as Q.

Q: Guy from startrek.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on December 01, 2013, 07:45:25 PM
This is really hard, not knowing what sorts of accents or other kinds of marks Portugese has. I would suspect that "what", "that" or both are among the meanings, but also that some mark or another may make all the difference, or even that the lack of one might make it mean something else altogether. If pressed, I would guess that without any marks, it might mean "that".
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on December 01, 2013, 07:50:03 PM
<snip>
If pressed, I would guess that without any marks, it might mean "that".

Which "that"? The first one, or the second one? Or both?
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on December 01, 2013, 09:30:17 PM
What. As in "what the hell?"
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on December 01, 2013, 09:39:35 PM
<snip>
If pressed, I would guess that without any marks, it might mean "that".

Which "that"? The first one, or the second one? Or both?

If one, then probably the other as well...I think there are only just so many accent marks to go around. Honestly, I'm just lost on this one, though.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on December 02, 2013, 04:54:14 AM
What as in "What?"
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on December 03, 2013, 01:38:40 PM
If one, then probably the other as well...I think there are only just so many accent marks to go around. Honestly, I'm just lost on this one, though.

Words in Portuguese, save for what we call "estrangeirismos" (foreign words that are written exactly as in the foreign language they are "borrowed" from), have up to two of four accent marks (their names are in Portuguese because I'm sure you know what they're called in English):
Acento agudo: ´
Acento grave: `
Til: ~
Acento circunflexo: ^
Note that no word that I'm aware of has both an acute and grave accent. That said, they can have one of them, and a til, such as órfão (orphan). However, no word (that I know of) has an acute/grave accent and a circumflex.

Another random curiosity:
In Portuguese, the opposite of "exaggerating" doesn't exist as a word; merely as a concept.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on December 14, 2013, 02:53:35 PM
The correct answer was "That (as in "Everything that we know tells us there are no gods")".
"Que", while similar to the Spanish "Qué", doesn't mean the same thing.

Next word: Atrito

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on December 18, 2013, 08:20:17 AM
Just trying to get some replies.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on December 18, 2013, 09:38:31 AM
My first impulse would be to say it's somehow related to attrition, so I'd say none of the above.

Second guess would be anterior.

Grrr...I hate having multiple choice answers where you can't immediately discard half of them and at least feel as though you know something.  :-\
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: ThatZenoGuy on December 18, 2013, 10:11:23 AM
I'm seeing all these words and simply going.
"Why...WHY don't i care about other languages...i know they are important...but why must i not learn them?"
I know like...a few Indonesian words, Japanese, German, and Russian...
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on December 18, 2013, 10:35:14 AM
Hmmm.

Friction as the Atrito reminds me of attrition...
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on December 18, 2013, 05:55:37 PM
Arthritis, just to be contrary.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on December 21, 2013, 03:11:37 PM
Mrjason wins.

Friction as the Atrito reminds me of attrition...

"Atrito" is very similar to "fricção" and means the same thing in English, but not in Portuguese. It's tough to explain, but "atrito" is usually used in physics to describe the force that opposes relative movement, whereas "fricção" is used for pretty much any other situation where you have two or more objects rubbing against each other.

I've run out of words for now, but I'll try to think of another one ASAP.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on December 22, 2013, 02:15:59 PM
Next word: Santa

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on December 22, 2013, 04:56:03 PM
I would probably go with the third and fifth options, mostly because it would be similar to Polish, where the word "swieta" would mean both saint and holy, female.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on December 28, 2013, 04:28:37 AM
Just trying to get some more replies.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on January 02, 2014, 10:30:58 AM
second, third, fourth and fifth  because I've heard santa used in place names to mean both i.e. santa cruz (holy cross) and santa maria del something (saint maria of ...)
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on January 06, 2014, 04:20:46 PM
jynnan tonnix wins.

I would probably go with the third and fifth options, mostly because it would be similar to Polish, where the word "swieta" would mean both saint and holy, female.

I'm out of words (again). One came to mind while I was working on my lanche, but I forgot it soon afterward.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on January 07, 2014, 11:29:23 AM
This is not the word I mentioned in my previous post, but it will do.

Next word: Mil

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on January 12, 2014, 04:38:07 PM
Still waiting for replies.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on January 12, 2014, 05:24:48 PM
I would guess "thousand", just based on the similarity to all manner of other languages. Which probably means it's another "false friend". Which is probably why I never answered to begin with :)
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: ThatZenoGuy on January 12, 2014, 09:35:01 PM
I am going with second and third options.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on January 13, 2014, 06:31:47 AM
Yeah I'm with jynnan tonnix because of the similarity to other languages.

Answer: 2.Thousand
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on January 14, 2014, 11:52:54 AM
Yup. Thousand.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jdawg70 on January 14, 2014, 11:56:59 AM
Next word: Mil

Meaning in English:
  • Thousandth

In electrical engineering land, often times it is used as shorthand for milli-inch.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on January 14, 2014, 12:14:37 PM
jynnan tonnix, Mrjason, and nogodsforme win.

I thought of a word while cooking lunch, but now I can't remember it. I'll try to get back to you ASAP.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on January 16, 2014, 07:38:53 AM
Next word: Indícios

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: ThatZenoGuy on January 16, 2014, 07:47:33 AM
I am going with Indications, but i am not sure that language it is.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on January 16, 2014, 06:42:58 PM
Second and third options. Easy.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on January 24, 2014, 11:50:03 AM
Angus and Alexis wins.

I am going with Indications, but i am not sure that language it is.

Next word: Cu

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on January 24, 2014, 05:46:55 PM
Could be neck or a$$, I will be polite and say neck.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: ThatZenoGuy on January 24, 2014, 09:56:48 PM
I am going to be rude, and say ass.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on January 27, 2014, 10:16:30 AM
Angus and Alexis wins.

I am going to be rude, and say ass.

Here's a story I heard about the Euro's original name, which can be abbreviated to "ECU". Supposedly the people here in Portugal started making fun of it (because it's pronounced "eh-coo", which sounds just like "é cu" ["is ass" in English], although it also sounds similar to "eco", which means "echo", but whatever), so the name was changed. I highly doubt this is true, but I thought it was noteworthy.

Next word: Dezenas

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on January 27, 2014, 10:21:43 AM
Not dozen as I don't think that translates from English into other languages. Isn't Dez ten in Portuguese? I'm going for 2: tens.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: ThatZenoGuy on January 27, 2014, 10:27:50 AM
Wow, i flunked it twice in a row XD.

Hmmmm, Dezenas...

Yeah, i am going for "tens" too.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on January 27, 2014, 02:04:18 PM
I'll agree on the "tens"
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: screwtape on January 27, 2014, 03:12:39 PM
none of the above.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on January 27, 2014, 04:44:47 PM
Seems like ten-something to me, too.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on January 31, 2014, 07:50:00 AM
Mrjason, Angus and Alexis, jynnan tonnix, and nogodsforme win.

I'm going for 2: tens.

Next word: Bata

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on January 31, 2014, 08:07:18 AM
I'll guess "lab coat". I doubt that the word "bat", whether the animal or the baseball bat, is etymologically related to anything in Portugese.

Don't know whether they much follow baseball in those countries, so there may be some chance that if they were talking about a baseball bat, they might use a variant of that word, but it seems much more likely that they would have their own term for a stick or club used to strike a ball.

And it just sounds more like an article of clothing.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on January 31, 2014, 09:33:15 PM
A bata is a nightgown in espanol, so I say lab coat, too, JT.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: ThatZenoGuy on February 02, 2014, 01:05:48 AM
I am going second and first options.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on February 03, 2014, 06:32:28 AM
jynnan tonnix and nogodsforme win.

I'll guess "lab coat".

Next word: Tecido

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on February 03, 2014, 08:23:15 AM
I'll go with the first and second option. Partly because of the way you worded the question. Because, in English, if you wanted to speak of something that both the body and clothing was made of, you would say "substance" or "material", but "tissue" would apply only to the body. However, since we also have "tissue paper", I assume that the two words are, indeed related, even though I hadn't ever really thought of them as such. And that somehow Portugese kept the meaning for all three uses rather than just two.

If not for that, I'd have probably just said option two, which just feels more as though it's right.

Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: ThatZenoGuy on February 03, 2014, 08:25:41 AM
I shall go with Tissue, body and clothes.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on February 03, 2014, 08:51:36 AM
yeah first and second for the same reasons as jynnan tonnix. Tissue paper is the same as other types of tissue.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on February 03, 2014, 04:45:15 PM
In espanol, tejido means knitted, like sweater fabric. So, I will risk the false cognate and go with tissue, body and clothes.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on February 06, 2014, 02:17:48 PM
Angus and Alexis and nogodsforme win.

I shall go with Tissue, body and clothes.

A tissue paper is called a "guardanapo" in Portuguese.

Next word: Fabrico

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on February 06, 2014, 02:33:50 PM
Angus and Alexis and nogodsforme win.

I shall go with Tissue, body and clothes.

A tissue paper is called a "guardanapo" in Portuguese.

Next word: Fabrico

Meaning in English:
  • Fabric
  • Factory
  • Fabricate (verb, first person, singular, present tense)
  • The first and second options
  • The second and third options
  • None of the above

Ah, well...I almost won as well. I should have gone with my first impulse instead of overthinking!

As for this one, I will go with Fabricate (verb, first person, singular, present tense). It seems as though it would fit with what I remember of Spanish grammar.

I don't think it's fabric, and since the noun, Factory, is Fabryka in Polish, it seems as though it might be a feminine noun in Portugese also.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on February 06, 2014, 02:39:04 PM
Ah, well...I almost won as well. I should have gone with my first impulse instead of overthinking!

As for this one, I will go with Fabricate (verb, first person, singular, present tense). It seems as though it would fit with what I remember of Spanish grammar.

I don't think it's fabric, and since the noun, Factory, is Fabryka in Polish, it seems as though it might be a feminine noun in Portugese also.

My mistake; I mistook "tissue paper" for "napkin". Napkin is "guardanapo" in Portuguese. Tissue paper is "lenço (de papel)".
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on February 06, 2014, 04:23:01 PM
Second and third. Factory and "I fabricate". Going with my espanol again.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: ThatZenoGuy on February 06, 2014, 07:49:13 PM
I am going to pick third option.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on February 09, 2014, 05:20:45 AM
jynnan tonnix and Angus and Alexis win.

I will go with Fabricate (verb, first person, singular, present tense).

Next word: Bactéria

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: ThatZenoGuy on February 09, 2014, 05:23:57 AM
First and second options.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on February 10, 2014, 05:32:05 AM
Looks too easy... So I'll go for Bacterium because I think you're trying to confuse us by putting in "Bacteria"  ;)
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on February 10, 2014, 10:45:47 AM
I think it's bacteria. Sometimes easy is right.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on February 10, 2014, 01:49:41 PM
I'm going with bacterium, since it seems more likely to me that since "bacteria" probably already sounds singular in Portugese, they would not fool with an alternate ending just as a nod to the Latin roots. I think that, paradoxically, the English language is more finicky about that kind of thing than many other languages which are actually more closely related to Latin. I don't know, in that case, what Portugese would use as a plural, though. Bacterias, maybe?
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on February 13, 2014, 01:48:09 PM
Mrjason and jynnan tonnix win.

So I'll go for Bacterium because I think you're trying to confuse us by putting in "Bacteria"  ;)

The plural of "bactéria" is "bactérias".
Short story: I was unaware that "bacteria" in English was plural, until I saw the Supernatural episode "Two Minutes to Midnight" and heard Death call Dean a "bacterium".

Next word: Exausto

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on February 13, 2014, 04:58:40 PM
The second choice.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on February 13, 2014, 07:13:54 PM
I'll guess the first and second choices. Probably wrong, but I can't decide which sounds more as though it could fit, so I'll just go with both of them this time.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on February 17, 2014, 01:56:08 PM
Just trying to get a few more replies. I have new words, but I don't want to use them too soon and risk running out.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: ThatZenoGuy on February 19, 2014, 02:31:39 AM
First option.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on February 19, 2014, 05:25:41 AM
second as well because of the "o" at the end
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on February 21, 2014, 01:26:53 PM
nogodsforme and Mrjason win.

The second choice.

Next word: Sigla

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: ThatZenoGuy on February 21, 2014, 07:41:18 PM
First option...?
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on February 22, 2014, 04:41:03 PM
Second choice again.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on February 27, 2014, 05:16:25 AM
Just waiting for some more replies.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on February 27, 2014, 05:30:03 AM
haven't got a clue about this one. I'll guess at #2
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on February 27, 2014, 07:40:19 AM
I've been having a really hard time with this one as well. At first, I was going to say option three (acronym) because the root part of it made me think more of something like sigil, or rune, and an acronym seemed more like a runic way of putting something across. Plus, it was different from the others, and it seemed as though it could be a tricky answer.

But then I thought about it some more, and realized that "signal" and sign" could really be just as runic at heart, and had the plus of a similar spelling. Plus, "sign" and "signal" can sometimes be synonymous anyway.

Decisions, decisions...why would you have put in a word like "acronym" with no visual similarity if it didn't have anything to do with it?

So I'm going to just go with all three.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on February 27, 2014, 02:02:12 PM
Everyone loses (haven't had one of those in a while!). The correct answer was "acronym". Let me explain. In Portuguese, we have two words for "acronym". One is "sigla", and the other is "acrónimo". The difference is that a "sigla" is read one letter at a time, like "PBS". An "acrónimo", on the other hand, is read as if it were a word, like "NASA".

Pronunciation[1]: uh-croh[2]-nee-moo.

Next word: Ramo

Meaning in English:
 1. I'll be posting pronunciations from now on; please remind me if I forget.
 2. Similar to "croc", sans the "c". The "cr" pronunciation is tricky, but if you say it like people who speak English do, you should be fine with Portuguese native speakers.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on February 27, 2014, 02:13:03 PM
And again, I should have gone with my first impulse instead of overthinking it!
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on February 27, 2014, 03:34:44 PM
And again, I should have gone with my first impulse instead of overthinking it!
I was tempted to say that to you, but since I got it wrong, I am glad I refrained.

Also, you are the sweetest person on this site, next to Nam. ;)
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: ThatZenoGuy on February 27, 2014, 07:53:55 PM
First option.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on March 07, 2014, 12:08:26 PM
Bumper cars.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on March 07, 2014, 12:18:03 PM
Hmm...

Do animal nouns have genders? Yes you do get "cow" as generic for the species and the female. However (if this answer were frog) wouldn't that be second andsecond and third... If you catch my drift.

Logic dictates that I should go for branch because of the way the answer options are given  :)

so the answer is:
#1 Branch
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on March 07, 2014, 12:22:24 PM

Do animal nouns have genders? Yes you do get "cow" as generic for the species and the female. However (if this answer were frog) wouldn't that be second andsecond and third... If you catch my drift.

In a way, yes, and not all are as obvious as you might think. "Cavalo", for example, is "horse", but "cavala" is a kind of fish.

Logic dictates that I should go for branch because of the way the answer options are given  :)

I group answers so it's easier when I want to add multiple possible answers. Their order means nothing beyond that.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on March 09, 2014, 09:41:40 AM
Angus and Alexis and Mrjason win.

First option.

Pronunciation: ruh-moo

Next word: Esse

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: ThatZenoGuy on March 09, 2014, 06:47:45 PM
First option.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on March 09, 2014, 07:37:07 PM
I'll say third and fourth options. It sounds like a sort of genderless "that".
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on March 10, 2014, 10:44:24 AM
I'll rule out "that" as I think that "that" should start with a Q as in French and D in german & dutch...

So out of Boss & Essay. Dunno. Essay seems to easy so Boss it is.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on March 15, 2014, 07:11:20 PM
Just hoping for some more replies.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on March 22, 2014, 08:35:09 AM
Everyone loses. The correct answer was "That (male; as in "That globe over there")".

Next word: Abreviação

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: ThatZenoGuy on March 22, 2014, 09:43:30 AM
Abbreviation.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on March 29, 2014, 05:10:09 PM
Bumper cars.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on March 29, 2014, 06:06:38 PM
That was the definition? Well, I certainly wouldn't have come up with that at random :)
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on April 03, 2014, 09:49:39 AM
Abbreviation. It's long enough.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on April 03, 2014, 01:01:45 PM
Everyone loses. The word "abreviação" does not exist in the Portuguese language. At least not in Portugal. It might exist in Brazil where, as I've mentioned, they basically copy the English language and call it Portuguese. Anyway, the correct word is "abreviatura".

Next word: Estrado

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on April 03, 2014, 01:06:10 PM
Almost forgot: the word "abreviatura" is pronounced thusly:
uh-bre-v[1]-uh-too-ra
As always, the "r" pronunciation is a bit off, due to the way it's pronounced in English, but it should be sufficient.
 1. As in the letter "v".
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on April 03, 2014, 09:00:52 PM
Road. Or straight.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on April 13, 2014, 01:30:50 PM
Just waiting for more replies...
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on April 17, 2014, 05:50:31 AM
Everyone loses. According to Wikipedia (I checked the article itself, but I also used Wikipedia as a sort of translator, as I had no idea what it was called in English), it's a "dais".

Next word: Exclusive

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on April 18, 2014, 04:43:47 PM
None of the above?
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on April 21, 2014, 06:39:12 AM
Bumper cars.
I just wanted to note that I'm going to add the following option: "Word does not exist". It may or may not be the correct answer for the next word, as I haven't come up with it yet.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on April 25, 2014, 04:48:22 AM
Trying to get more replies again.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on April 25, 2014, 05:00:57 AM
Exclusive... Its gotta be Exclusive
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on April 27, 2014, 05:43:23 AM
Everyone loses. The correct answer was "Excluding". Let me explain:
When we (in Portuguese) say, for example, "How many integers are there between 1 and 3, excluding 3?", we say "Quantos números inteiros há entre 1 e 3, exclusive?". "Exclusive" means that the last thing we said is excluded.
"Exclusive" is pronounced thusly:
eish-cloo-z[1]-veh
"Inclusive" is the opposite of "inclusive" and is pronounced thusly:
im[2]-cloo-z[3]-veh

This next word is probably going to be my last.

Next word: A

Meaning in English:
 1. As in the letter "z", as pronounced by USA citizens.
 2. As if you were pronouncing "important", sans the "portant".
 3. As in the letter "z", as pronounced by USA citizens.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on May 02, 2014, 06:13:22 AM
word does not exist, it seems too short...

OAA - If this is your last I just want to say thanks for the game, I've enjoyed playing.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on May 02, 2014, 01:43:23 PM
I'll take a wild guess and say "none of the above". The word is not too short. The word "a" in English is certainly proof of that. And while it might mean something similar in Portugese (as in the first options), I'm going to guess that it actually means something more like "to" as in other languages.

Oh, and I've enjoyed the game as well :) Thanks.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on May 04, 2014, 04:40:01 PM
Agree with jt above.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on May 10, 2014, 09:31:23 AM
"Inclusive" is the opposite of "inclusive"
<snip>

Obviously this was a typo. The second "inclusive" should read "exclusive".

Everyone loses. The word "a" is an article and means "the (female)". It's pronounced as "uh".

Next word: Massa

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on May 12, 2014, 10:38:59 AM
The first one. Like in espanol...
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on May 17, 2014, 09:30:35 AM
Anyone else?
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on May 18, 2014, 08:06:25 AM
I'll be waiting until tomorrow, and then I'll post the answer.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on May 19, 2014, 06:13:01 AM
Yeah, I'll go for #1 too.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on May 19, 2014, 01:47:54 PM
Everyone loses. The correct answer was "The first and third options".

We call "massa" any kind of pasta, such as spaghetti, lasagna layer-separator-thingies, fusilli, tagliatelle, and so on. It's also the term for the property inherent to any particle (mass). The religious term is "missa".
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on May 29, 2014, 04:49:09 AM
No, I haven't forgotten about this game.

Next word: Bosta

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on May 29, 2014, 08:19:58 AM
i think its poo so second and third options
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on July 30, 2014, 06:11:06 PM
Everyone loses. The correct answer was "Crap". I want to note, however, that "bosta" is more offensive than "crap". In fact, the proper word for "crap" would be "porcaria".

Next word: Côco

Meaning in English:

I promise these are the last poop-themed answers... For now.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on July 31, 2014, 10:32:03 AM
Coconut. Low hanging fruit, so to speak.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on August 01, 2014, 06:47:16 AM
I want to say poop, but I agree with nogodsforme because of the coco element...
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 01, 2014, 06:53:25 AM
I'll give you a little tip:[1]
The word "côco" is very similar to "cocó". One of them means "poop", while the other means "coconut".
 1. Note: Tip may or may not be useful.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Timo on August 01, 2014, 06:59:09 AM
I'll go with poop.  In Spanish, we can call it caca.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on August 01, 2014, 07:13:32 AM
I'll go with poop.  In Spanish, we can call it caca.

yeah, I've heard of Kaka.

I'm changing to poop. I'm changing my guess to the word poop.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on August 01, 2014, 08:42:43 AM
Sounds like a good setup for puns on dingleberries...
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: atheola on August 02, 2014, 03:05:25 PM
I vote none of the above, but it might translate roughly to I dunno..
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 02, 2014, 03:15:26 PM
nogodsforme wins. The word "côco" is pronounced thusly:
ko[1]-ku
The word "cocó" is pronounced like this:
Caw-caw[2]

Next word: Males

Meaning in English:
 1. Like in sci-fi series with made-up languages that involve a lot of apostrophes for no reason. Think "Chappa'ko" (Supergate) in Stargate SG-1. Google it if you've never heard it being pronounced.
 2. Short "aw" sounds on both, the second one is more emphasized, and yes, these are the onomatopoeia for the sound a crow makes.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: atheola on August 02, 2014, 04:31:18 PM
I'm guessing 2nd & 3rd kind of like malice or malaise feeling crappy..
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on August 02, 2014, 06:16:34 PM
^^^Me too, although "males" can be pretty crappy sometimes.... :angel:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: atheola on August 02, 2014, 09:26:07 PM
^^^Me too, although "males" can be pretty crappy sometimes.... :angel:
That's just an ugly rumor. We're always perfectly well behaved.. At least I am. :D
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on August 04, 2014, 08:12:57 AM
I'm guessing the second option
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on August 04, 2014, 02:11:33 PM
^^^Me too, although "males" can be pretty crappy sometimes.... :angel:
That's just an ugly rumor. We're always perfectly well behaved.. At least I am. :D

Then you should be happy that there are some misbehaving males in the world to make you stand out. If they all were as perfect as you, who would notice? ;)
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 04, 2014, 02:18:13 PM
Then you should be happy that there are some misbehaving males in the world to make you stand out. If they all were as perfect as you, who would notice? ;)

Misbehaving males just need some love... &)
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on August 04, 2014, 03:57:46 PM
Then you should be happy that there are some misbehaving males in the world to make you stand out. If they all were as perfect as you, who would notice? ;)

Misbehaving males just need some love... &)

Considering how so many women seem to flock to the bad boys, I don't exactly think that love is what they are missing. Hugh Hefner, Mick Jagger, Bobby Brown and Donald Trump can be total a$$holes and still get women. You probably know jerky guys with no money at all who still have girlfriends galore. Even Hitler and Stalin managed to attract the babes..... :-\
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 04, 2014, 04:04:59 PM
Considering how so many women seem to flock to the bad boys, I don't exactly think that love is what they are missing.

'Twas a joke. "Bad boys" deserve a psychologist to teach them about individuality and respect.

Hugh Hefner, Mick Jagger, Bobby Brown and Donald Trump can be total a$$holes and still get women. You probably know jerky guys with no money at all who still have girlfriends galore. Even Hitler and Stalin managed to attract the babes..... :-\

I actually don't know guys like that because I don't make friends like that, but I do know girls who are attracted to "bad boys". They're also classified under "girls who have never had a boyfriend". Seriously. Every single one of them told me they had never been in a relationship. I've tried convincing him that dating dicks is not the same as dating people with dicks, but they don't seem to get it, so now I just shrug it off as psychological immaturity.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: atheola on August 06, 2014, 06:50:41 PM
So this definition has morphed into a morality debate...sort of..  Round the tree and down the rabbit hole..  What's the definition?
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 16, 2014, 03:45:39 AM
atheola and nogodsforme win.

I'm guessing 2nd & 3rd kind of like malice or malaise feeling crappy..

Next word: Índios

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on August 17, 2014, 10:10:20 PM
I'm on a roll! Indios means Indians.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: atheola on August 19, 2014, 09:50:52 AM
Hoosiers!  ;D
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 21, 2014, 03:04:50 PM
Anyone else?
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: atheola on August 21, 2014, 03:12:26 PM
Hindi?
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Defiance on August 21, 2014, 03:39:10 PM
Indiansz
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on August 21, 2014, 03:41:56 PM
Hoosiers!  ;D

Hooters?
https://www.hooters.com/Home/Default.aspx

Oh, never mind. Stupid throwback to the Playboy bunny era.....
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 21, 2014, 05:08:52 PM
Everyone loses. The answer was "None of the above". Did you think I kept including that option just for kicks? ;)
"Índios" actually means "Native Americans". Remember how they used to be called "Indians" in English, due to a "slight" miscalculation as to where the settlers had arrived? Yeah, see, in Portuguese, we call them "Índios", and we call Indians "Indianos".

I don't have another word at the moment. As always, you can suggest a word in English and I'll do the opposite of what I've been doing: present a bunch of Portuguese options for the one English word.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Defiance on August 21, 2014, 05:29:37 PM
Technically, we're still right. Historians often refer to NA's as Indians, even when they know the meaning.

One Above All loses.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 21, 2014, 05:42:23 PM
Technically, we're still right. Historians often refer to NA's as Indians, even when they know the meaning.

One Above All loses.

Argumentum ab auctoritate much?
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Defiance on August 21, 2014, 05:51:11 PM
No, not really no. We all know what Indians really are. It's more convenient to say that than Native Americans, and historians don't get super mad when we use it. What's the problem?

Just admit it. We're right.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 21, 2014, 05:54:30 PM
No, not really no. We all know what Indians really are. It's more convenient to say that than Native Americans, and historians don't get super mad when we use it. What's the problem?

Just admit it. We're right.

Convenient=/=Right
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Defiance on August 21, 2014, 05:57:02 PM
No, not really no. We all know what Indians really are. It's more convenient to say that than Native Americans, and historians don't get super mad when we use it. What's the problem?

Just admit it. We're right.

Convenient=/=Right

Convenient + The fact that people know what Indians is referring to = right enough.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on August 21, 2014, 06:05:50 PM
Convenient + The fact that people know what Indians is referring to = right enough.

Right enough for you=/=Right enough to win
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on August 21, 2014, 10:08:40 PM
Boys, boys, calm down. You are both correct, okay? Everyone gets a participation ribbon.   :police:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on February 15, 2015, 08:01:52 AM
Next word: Mama

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Nam on February 15, 2015, 11:48:50 AM
A nurse at a hospital I was at last week last name was "Moms". I thought that was a weird last name.

-Nam
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on February 16, 2015, 08:37:43 AM
Next word: Mama

Meaning in English:
  • Mama
  • Mommy
  • Boob
  • The first and second options
  • Word does not exist
  • None of the above

Boob, as its similar to mammary. As in gland.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on February 17, 2015, 06:50:53 PM
^^^Agreed.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: LoriPinkAngel on February 18, 2015, 01:08:17 PM
I'm with them.  ^^^
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on February 20, 2015, 11:45:12 AM
^^^
So am I. Though I do think the word for "mother" is probably very similar, but with maybe an accent mark or something to differentiate it.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on February 22, 2015, 06:51:30 PM
Everyone wins.
The word "mama" is sort of a "semi-swear word" in the Portuguese language, even though "breast cancer" is "cancro da mama"[1]. However, "mama" is a word you'll hardly hear on its own, due to the aforementioned status. My old PE teacher called this contradiction ridiculous, saying "mama" was just as valid as "seio" (breast/bosom). It's pronounced thusly: muh-muh.

Next word: Azeite

Meaning in English:

This should be interesting. ;D
 1. Literally, "cancer of the boob".
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on February 23, 2015, 08:40:12 AM
Next word: Azeite

Meaning in English:
  • Oil (crude oil)
  • Oil (the "high-fat" cooking kind, like sunflower seed oil)
  • Oil (the "low-fat" cooking kind, like olive oil)
  • The second and third options
  • Word does not exist
  • None of the above

This should be interesting. ;D

Do not have a clue on this one, the word isn't familiar at all.

I'll go for none of the above.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on February 23, 2015, 08:57:29 AM
<snip>

You have a laugh at "Dick Swaab", but not "Cancer of the boob"? For shame, Mrjason.[1]
 1. Yes, I know what cancer is. It's still a funny translation.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on February 23, 2015, 10:10:58 AM
You have a laugh at "Dick Swaab", but not "Cancer of the boob"? For shame, Mrjason.[1]
 1. Yes, I know what cancer is. It's still a funny translation.

My sense of humour in on the sophisticated to lavatorial continuum, it doesn't really touch on boobs[2].
 2. touch on boobs *snigger*. I was wrong. What an odd translation
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on February 23, 2015, 01:11:35 PM
For some reason the word makes me think I might have seen it on a bottle of olive oil or something similar...but that doesn't help as far as knowing what specific sort it was or whether it would apply to other kinds as well. There's not much there like a root which I can identify. But I'll just go with olive oil.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on February 23, 2015, 04:22:55 PM
Seems like aceite which en espanol includes any kind of oil, even motor oil. So, some kind of oil. I guess the second and third. :-\
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Timo on February 24, 2015, 11:57:19 AM
Seems like aceite which en espanol includes any kind of oil, even motor oil. So, some kind of oil. I guess the second and third. :-\

Agreed. Like cambio de aceite. Also, from experience, I'd imagine that it means something dirty in Brazil. I think that's the way these things go.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on March 06, 2015, 10:42:04 AM
Come on One, tell us the answer.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on March 06, 2015, 01:33:28 PM
jynnan tonnix wins.
"Azeite", in Portuguese, means "olive oil", and only olive oil. Other types of oil are collectively called "óleos" (plural of "óleo"). Sunflower seed oil, for example, is called "óleo de girassol"[1].
 1. Lit.: Sunflower oil.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on March 06, 2015, 09:18:24 PM
Those wacky Portuguese.  :)
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on June 23, 2015, 10:18:01 AM
Next word: Estágio

Meaning in English:

FYI, regarding the last word: motor oil is also called "óleo". However, for clarity's sake, we usually say "óleo de motor" (motor oil).
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: nogodsforme on June 23, 2015, 10:35:21 AM
First and second.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Airyaman on June 23, 2015, 11:18:35 AM
Somewhere, of course in the South, they are complaining that the schools are teaching kids Spanish. 

What an ignorant and unsubstantiated remark.

http://www.care2.com/causes/5-schools-that-tried-to-ban-speaking-spanish.html

1 of 5 is in the South, 1 is in NJ and another is in Kansas City.

Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: screwtape on June 23, 2015, 11:49:58 AM
What an ignorant and unsubstantiated remark.

http://www.care2.com/causes/5-schools-that-tried-to-ban-speaking-spanish.html

1 of 5 is in the South, 1 is in NJ and another is in Kansas City.

To be fair, Vineland is southern NJ.  And Texas and Arizona could be considered south.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Airyaman on June 23, 2015, 02:23:32 PM
What an ignorant and unsubstantiated remark.

http://www.care2.com/causes/5-schools-that-tried-to-ban-speaking-spanish.html

1 of 5 is in the South, 1 is in NJ and another is in Kansas City.

To be fair, Vineland is southern NJ.  And Texas and Arizona could be considered south.

I'll give you Texas, but Arizona is not considered to be a southern state.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Nam on June 23, 2015, 02:39:51 PM
Arizona is not a Southern state, or ever listed as one in reference to "The South".

-Nam
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: screwtape on June 23, 2015, 03:40:12 PM
Arizona is not a Southern state, or ever listed as one in reference to "The South".

-Nam

whoa.  Someone's extra sensitive today. 

Since the thing about Vineland being southern Jersey clearly didn't tip you off, it was tongue-in-cheek. 



Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on June 23, 2015, 05:56:16 PM
Somewhere, of course in the South, they are complaining that the schools are teaching kids Spanish. 

What an ignorant and unsubstantiated remark.

http://www.care2.com/causes/5-schools-that-tried-to-ban-speaking-spanish.html

1 of 5 is in the South, 1 is in NJ and another is in Kansas City.

Check the time stamp. 2013.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on October 08, 2015, 07:05:49 AM
Everyone (id est: nogodsforme, the only one who tried) loses. "Estágio" means "Internship".

Next word: Avos

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: LoriPinkAngel on October 08, 2015, 10:10:17 AM
The first & second options?
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on October 12, 2015, 04:59:08 PM
Bump.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on October 12, 2015, 06:09:50 PM
Ave is latin for 'hello' so #2 doesn't make sense if #1 and #3 are options. Therefore it's #4 or #5. #4 seems unlikely due to the latin root, so I choose # 5;

None of the above

edit: and before i forget "Ave" isn't a word in English; in middle england it's a contraction of the word 'avenue', as in a small road. It can also be a colloquialism of the verb 'to have', for example " I ave an excellent command of the English language".
So, it's not #2 :P
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on October 13, 2015, 05:28:04 AM
and before i forget "Ave" isn't a word in English

From what I understand, English "borrowed" the Latin word and incorporated it into itself. That's why it's an option. It may even be the correct option. Who knows? Besides me, obviously.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on October 15, 2015, 10:23:08 AM
I'm taking a punt on the answer based on what I know. I could be totally wrong but I should get points for showing my working.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on October 15, 2015, 01:48:42 PM
I should get points for showing my working.

Nobody's keeping score!
...You're losing.
(House quote, FYI)
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on October 30, 2015, 06:25:28 PM
Mrjason wins (but not for the reasons he thinks).
None of the above

The word "avos" is untranslatable to any language I know of. The closest thing in English would be the suffix "ths" (as in: three hundredths, five thousandths, and so on). In Portuguese, the fraction 1/25 is called "um vinte e cinco avos" ("lit.": one twenty fifths). We have specific words from 1/2 to 1/10 for those fractions, but everything after that is just "[numerator] [denominator] avos".
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Mrjason on November 12, 2015, 06:32:53 PM
I'll take the win. Thanks for the explanation.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on December 28, 2015, 02:56:55 PM
I'm introducing a new option.

Next word: Ditado

Meaning in English:
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: jynnan tonnix on December 28, 2015, 03:45:55 PM
I'm just going to take a wild guess at "all of the above" because it feels as though it could apply to both dictation and a saying, but there's not an option for "first choice" combined with any of the individual "dictation" choices, and it doesn't strike me as particularly ill-fitting for any of them.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: LoriPinkAngel on December 28, 2015, 04:30:10 PM
I pick the 1st option.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: Defiance on December 28, 2015, 11:31:07 PM
I pick the 1st option.
Yo tambièn.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on December 31, 2015, 01:23:37 PM
Bump.
Title: Re: Guess what that word/phrase means in English
Post by: One Above All on January 02, 2016, 02:49:26 PM
jynnan tonnix wins.
I'm just going to take a wild guess at "all of the above"

Ditado can mean a saying[1], it can mean "dictated"[2], and it can mean dictation as an exercise[3] or the transcript[4].

Pronunciation: Dee-tah-doo
 1. Olhos que não vêm, coração que não sente being an example I posted in this very thread a while back.
 2. Isto foi-me ditado.
Lit.: This was dictated to me.
 3. Vamos fazer um ditado.
Lit.: Let's do a dictation.
 4. Aqui está o ditado.
Lit.: Here's the dictation.