Author Topic: A few recent sketches  (Read 568 times)

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Offline Emma286

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A few recent sketches
« on: July 24, 2018, 03:02:31 AM »
Thought I’d share:










Offline Nick

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Re: A few recent sketches
« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2018, 05:43:23 AM »
Very nice.  I have mastered stick people.
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Offline velkyn

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Re: A few recent sketches
« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2018, 06:31:46 AM »
I do wish I could draw.   very cool
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Offline Emma286

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Re: A few recent sketches
« Reply #3 on: July 24, 2018, 11:15:12 AM »
Thank you! :-)

Hehe I imagine your stick figures are better than mine Nick!

And if it’s any consolation Velkyn, I drew those from images in front of me using step by step instructions. Didn’t do it out of my head! And I didn’t get the sketches immediately as they are now. It took a while of erasing parts I’d drawn and redoing them multiple times!

Are you still trying out that alcohol ink art? If so, how is it going?

Offline velkyn

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Re: A few recent sketches
« Reply #4 on: July 24, 2018, 01:29:26 PM »
Thank you! :-)

Hehe I imagine your stick figures are better than mine Nick!

And if it’s any consolation Velkyn, I drew those from images in front of me using step by step instructions. Didn’t do it out of my head! And I didn’t get the sketches immediately as they are now. It took a while of erasing parts I’d drawn and redoing them multiple times!

Are you still trying out that alcohol ink art? If so, how is it going?

I've tried the step by step instructions and I still suck.  I can copy pretty well though.   :)   I'm pretty much desiring to be a comic book artist circa 1980s right off the bat, and that ain't going to happen...

The alcohol ink is great fun.   I even started an etsy store just as a *complete* vanity project.  ;D
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Offline Emma286

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Re: A few recent sketches
« Reply #5 on: July 25, 2018, 01:59:40 AM »
Thank you! :-)

Hehe I imagine your stick figures are better than mine Nick!

And if it’s any consolation Velkyn, I drew those from images in front of me using step by step instructions. Didn’t do it out of my head! And I didn’t get the sketches immediately as they are now. It took a while of erasing parts I’d drawn and redoing them multiple times!

Are you still trying out that alcohol ink art? If so, how is it going?

I've tried the step by step instructions and I still suck.  I can copy pretty well though.   :)   I'm pretty much desiring to be a comic book artist circa 1980s right off the bat, and that ain't going to happen...

The alcohol ink is great fun.   I even started an etsy store just as a *complete* vanity project.  ;D

Practice makes perfect! ;-)

That’s awesome that you started an Etsy store! Hoping that works out well!

And glad that you are enjoying it.

Offline jynnan tonnix

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Re: A few recent sketches
« Reply #6 on: July 25, 2018, 11:30:54 AM »
Here's one I did of my granddaughter a couple of weeks ago (which still needs to be finished). It had been a really long time - probably seven or eight years since I last did a portrait, and babies are difficult to draw (even from photographs!) at the best of times. If she looks a bit like the Gerber baby, it's not my fault...she really IS  that cute! LOL

Not sure how to get this any bigger...none of the detail shows up in this size
« Last Edit: July 25, 2018, 11:33:32 AM by jynnan tonnix »

Offline velkyn

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Re: A few recent sketches
« Reply #7 on: July 25, 2018, 11:52:26 AM »
if you click o the image, it shows up very nicely. 
"There is no use in arguing with a man who can multiply anything by the square root of minus 1" - Pirates of Venus, ERB

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Offline Emma286

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Re: A few recent sketches
« Reply #8 on: July 25, 2018, 11:54:09 AM »
Think that’s really good jynnan! I’ve never yet gotten the hang of drawing people, babies included. Thanks for sharing. You’ve done some fantastic shading there!

Offline jynnan tonnix

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Re: A few recent sketches
« Reply #9 on: July 25, 2018, 07:59:28 PM »
if you click o the image, it shows up very nicely.
Thanks...it didn't want to do anything on my computer but try to send it to downloads, and I wasn't sure anyone would care enough to do that. It did work fine on my phone, though.

Think that’s really good jynnan! I’ve never yet gotten the hang of drawing people, babies included. Thanks for sharing. You’ve done some fantastic shading there!
And thanks to you as well...it's not great - back when I was in my late teens/early 20's and had few other distractions my work was much better - I'm honestly really impressed when I look at it today. But all I wanted to do back then was to draw (homework be damned!)...I'm so rusty now I barely think it's worth anything. But the fact that I managed to do that in just over an hour made me think I might still have a few old skills which haven't totally gone to pot.

Your drawings show promise as well...Keep it up! The more you practice, the better your eye will get. It might take a couple of years from where you are now, but you are on your way.

I'm 59 and have a friend a couple of years older than I am who took the plunge and went to art school last year. Her work when she started was probably about on your level, but I look at stuff she is producing now with envy. I always wanted to go to art school, but somewhere along the line just realized I was so set in my own ways of doing certain things that it was going to take a lot more "unlearning" than I was prepared for before I could really progress....
« Last Edit: July 25, 2018, 08:20:29 PM by jynnan tonnix »

Offline Emma286

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Re: A few recent sketches
« Reply #10 on: July 26, 2018, 02:20:26 AM »
Think that’s really good jynnan! I’ve never yet gotten the hang of drawing people, babies included. Thanks for sharing. You’ve done some fantastic shading there!

And thanks to you as well...it's not great - back when I was in my late teens/early 20's and had few other distractions my work was much better - I'm honestly really impressed when I look at it today. But all I wanted to do back then was to draw (homework be damned!)...I'm so rusty now I barely think it's worth anything. But the fact that I managed to do that in just over an hour made me think I might still have a few old skills which haven't totally gone to pot.

Your drawings show promise as well...Keep it up! The more you practice, the better your eye will get. It might take a couple of years from where you are now, but you are on your way.

I'm 59 and have a friend a couple of years older than I am who took the plunge and went to art school last year. Her work when she started was probably about on your level, but I look at stuff she is producing now with envy. I always wanted to go to art school, but somewhere along the line just realized I was so set in my own ways of doing certain things that it was going to take a lot more "unlearning" than I was prepared for before I could really progress....

1.) I am intrigued to know what your older art work looked like now! If you ever want to share any
would be interested to see it! :)

I think it can often be harder to appreciate our own work over that of other people’s. See, to me, that looks great because it comes over to me that the shading really helps to bring that face to life. Especially with the eyes! To me they seem to take on an almost photograph like quality. Same on the mouth. To me, you’ve also got the head and face size looking realistic. When I copy draw, I’m forever drawing things too wide or too thin, having to repeatedly erase what I’ve done and start again.

Your drawing also reminds me of stuff my mother has drawn. It’s always been better than anything I’ve done I think.

You never know, maybe a bit of regular practice (if you can squeeze the time in) may show you’ve got more ability left than you see!

You can paint too can’t you? That’s something I can’t do well.

Think it was last year that, after checking out some Bob Ross videos (I like listening to his videos as well as watching them at times on YouTube), I started thinking “some of what he’s done looks pretty easy, surely I can do something along the lines of at least one of the portrait types he’s done if I just follow one of the videos while I’m doing it.” I then purchased some cheap acrylic paints and a paper pad with some special kind of paper. I soon got going.

Very soon, into the process, I realised things weren’t turning out as hoped! The colours weren’t blending as I’d expected and I think I probably struggled with getting shapes to come out as I’d expected they would too. I was pretty disappointed and frustrated. I didn’t get why things had gone so wrong when I’d paid the close attention I had to what Bob Ross did as relevant.

I later managed to work out that the quality of paints used makes a difference to these things. Also, I’d previously missed that Bob Ross used to prepare his painting easel in a certain way before starting stuff (might have been with some kind of thinner though can’t recall for sure) to make colours blend extra easily. After learning this I felt so silly at the time haha!

2.) Thank you, I appreciate the encouragement! I’ll bear your advice in mind.

3.) That’s great that your friend went to art school and got out of it what she did. I can appreciate why you didn’t want to do the same though.

It’s not essential, imo, that people attend an art school to do sketching anyways. Stuff can be learned from online videos, articles and books on sketching. These things, I imagine, could come in useful as reminders of sketching techniques that have been forgotten!

Offline jynnan tonnix

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Re: A few recent sketches
« Reply #11 on: July 26, 2018, 11:27:18 AM »
Think that’s really good jynnan! I’ve never yet gotten the hang of drawing people, babies included. Thanks for sharing. You’ve done some fantastic shading there!

And thanks to you as well...it's not great - back when I was in my late teens/early 20's and had few other distractions my work was much better - I'm honestly really impressed when I look at it today. But all I wanted to do back then was to draw (homework be damned!)...I'm so rusty now I barely think it's worth anything. But the fact that I managed to do that in just over an hour made me think I might still have a few old skills which haven't totally gone to pot.

Your drawings show promise as well...Keep it up! The more you practice, the better your eye will get. It might take a couple of years from where you are now, but you are on your way.

I'm 59 and have a friend a couple of years older than I am who took the plunge and went to art school last year. Her work when she started was probably about on your level, but I look at stuff she is producing now with envy. I always wanted to go to art school, but somewhere along the line just realized I was so set in my own ways of doing certain things that it was going to take a lot more "unlearning" than I was prepared for before I could really progress....

1.) I am intrigued to know what your older art work looked like now! If you ever want to share any
would be interested to see it! :)

I think it can often be harder to appreciate our own work over that of other people’s. See, to me, that looks great because it comes over to me that the shading really helps to bring that face to life. Especially with the eyes! To me they seem to take on an almost photograph like quality. Same on the mouth. To me, you’ve also got the head and face size looking realistic. When I copy draw, I’m forever drawing things too wide or too thin, having to repeatedly erase what I’ve done and start again.

Your drawing also reminds me of stuff my mother has drawn. It’s always been better than anything I’ve done I think.

You never know, maybe a bit of regular practice (if you can squeeze the time in) may show you’ve got more ability left than you see!

You can paint too can’t you? That’s something I can’t do well.

Think it was last year that, after checking out some Bob Ross videos (I like listening to his videos as well as watching them at times on YouTube), I started thinking “some of what he’s done looks pretty easy, surely I can do something along the lines of at least one of the portrait types he’s done if I just follow one of the videos while I’m doing it.” I then purchased some cheap acrylic paints and a paper pad with some special kind of paper. I soon got going.

Very soon, into the process, I realised things weren’t turning out as hoped! The colours weren’t blending as I’d expected and I think I probably struggled with getting shapes to come out as I’d expected they would too. I was pretty disappointed and frustrated. I didn’t get why things had gone so wrong when I’d paid the close attention I had to what Bob Ross did as relevant.

I later managed to work out that the quality of paints used makes a difference to these things. Also, I’d previously missed that Bob Ross used to prepare his painting easel in a certain way before starting stuff (might have been with some kind of thinner though can’t recall for sure) to make colours blend extra easily. After learning this I felt so silly at the time haha!

2.) Thank you, I appreciate the encouragement! I’ll bear your advice in mind.

3.) That’s great that your friend went to art school and got out of it what she did. I can appreciate why you didn’t want to do the same though.

It’s not essential, imo, that people attend an art school to do sketching anyways. Stuff can be learned from online videos, articles and books on sketching. These things, I imagine, could come in useful as reminders of sketching techniques that have been forgotten!

Thanks for your comments...I think I have two or three photos of old work saved on my laptop, they are also portraits, which I did going on 40 years ago when I was in my early 20's, and, at first glance, might not look that different from the sketch of my granddaughter, but I can tell that the lines are much more confident, and my ease with proportion and such quite a bit stronger. The shading is just something I more or less picked up naturally as I was always fascinated by faces growing up and there was something about recreating the ones I found particularly attractive that almost gave the sensation of touching them, so I sort of got obsessed with trying to get likenesses as close as I could.

Actually, most of the things I produced back then which I'm most proud of were more like line drawings and much more unfinished, and might not even look as impressive at first glance, but I remember that I could capture movement and proportion so much more easily that I was able to do things directly in ink, or capture a likeness in just a few minutes - almost like a caricature, but without the exaggerations. I can't do that anymore.

I still  wish I could have gone to art school while I was still in the development stage of really being able to draw well. I'm sure I would have learned SO much more, but, as I say, I've muddled along doing it my own way and trying to solve challenges as best I could for so long, that now when I learn something new, it always seems to mean going back to square one, and I don't seem to have the patience to re-learn how to do things with alternate techniques and approaches. Some people seem to have the capacity to become "real" artists without going to art school, but I'm not one of those. I have a bit of a facility for copying, but that's about it.

Anyway, here are the few drawings I have.. I'd try to find more, but my laptop is very temperamental of late, and downloading things can be an exercise in frustration. They are portraits of Leonard Bernstein, Richard Burton, and J.R.R Tolkein (from the back of a paperback).



Offline Emma286

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Re: A few recent sketches
« Reply #12 on: July 27, 2018, 09:21:39 AM »
No worries Jynnan (on the comments).

I think those later one’s are brilliant! You created some really realistic looking detail with the facial features, ears and hair.  :) I can see why you think they were better as more work went into them, but I still like your baby one also.

I would say that I’m kind of like you, regarding having a certain knack for copying stuff but that’s about it. I get what you mean.

Offline Emma286

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Re: A few recent sketches
« Reply #13 on: July 27, 2018, 05:11:57 PM »
Have you ever sold any of your work?

Offline jynnan tonnix

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Re: A few recent sketches
« Reply #14 on: July 27, 2018, 05:52:49 PM »
Have you ever sold any of your work?
Occasionally...usually it's a commission, and at other times I have donated works to charity auctions.

This one in particular was commissioned for an annual charity project by a fellow Submarine Officers' Spouse a few years ago, and due to a series of events ended up as a pretty much permanent piece of art for the home of the Chief of Naval Operations.
 
It's not among my very best work, though I like it, but it did go over pretty well, and made them a bit of money in prints, notecards, and such.

« Last Edit: July 27, 2018, 07:51:53 PM by jynnan tonnix »

Offline Emma286

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Re: A few recent sketches
« Reply #15 on: July 28, 2018, 08:58:22 AM »
That’s great!

What kind of colouring tools did you use for the picture?

Did you have to use any special type of paper?

Lovely job again. I can see why that went over well! Especially like what you did with the crests of the waves (though like all of it).

Offline jynnan tonnix

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Re: A few recent sketches
« Reply #16 on: July 28, 2018, 09:55:44 AM »
That’s great!

What kind of colouring tools did you use for the picture?

Did you have to use any special type of paper?

Lovely job again. I can see why that went over well! Especially like what you did with the crests of the waves (though like all of it).

It was done with water-soluble oil paint on canvas. I had been trying the water-soluble oils as I really don't care too much for working in acrylic paint (it dries too quickly for me to blend the way I prefer, though I've tried it again more recently and found that I get good results by layering washes and scumbling rather than trying to blend wet colors). I didn't really care for the water-soluble oils either, even though I'd bought good quality, I found that certain shades liked to separate when I tried mixing them. I just don't like fooling with turpentine and other such solvents necessary for "real" oil paint.

I used to do quite a bit of work with watercolors, which I should just go back to, even though my style is not of the traditional loose washy sort of technique generally associated with watercolors -  wish I could work that way, but I'm more of a fine detail person by nature, it seems.

Offline freakygin

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Re: A few recent sketches
« Reply #17 on: July 29, 2018, 10:34:15 PM »
@Emma286
I like the wolves, absolutely badass

@jynnan tonnix
Daaangg, color me impressed... Nuff said
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Offline Emma286

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Re: A few recent sketches
« Reply #18 on: July 30, 2018, 01:44:50 AM »
That’s great!

What kind of colouring tools did you use for the picture?

Did you have to use any special type of paper?

Lovely job again. I can see why that went over well! Especially like what you did with the crests of the waves (though like all of it).

It was done with water-soluble oil paint on canvas. I had been trying the water-soluble oils as I really don't care too much for working in acrylic paint (it dries too quickly for me to blend the way I prefer, though I've tried it again more recently and found that I get good results by layering washes and scumbling rather than trying to blend wet colors). I didn't really care for the water-soluble oils either, even though I'd bought good quality, I found that certain shades liked to separate when I tried mixing them. I just don't like fooling with turpentine and other such solvents necessary for "real" oil paint.

I used to do quite a bit of work with watercolors, which I should just go back to, even though my style is not of the traditional loose washy sort of technique generally associated with watercolors -  wish I could work that way, but I'm more of a fine detail person by nature, it seems.

That’s great!

What kind of colouring tools did you use for the picture?

Did you have to use any special type of paper?

Lovely job again. I can see why that went over well! Especially like what you did with the crests of the waves (though like all of it).

It was done with water-soluble oil paint on canvas. I had been trying the water-soluble oils as I really don't care too much for working in acrylic paint (it dries too quickly for me to blend the way I prefer, though I've tried it again more recently and found that I get good results by layering washes and scumbling rather than trying to blend wet colors). I didn't really care for the water-soluble oils either, even though I'd bought good quality, I found that certain shades liked to separate when I tried mixing them. I just don't like fooling with turpentine and other such solvents necessary for "real" oil paint.

I used to do quite a bit of work with watercolors, which I should just go back to, even though my style is not of the traditional loose washy sort of technique generally associated with watercolors -  wish I could work that way, but I'm more of a fine detail person by nature, it seems.

I know what you mean on acrylic paint drying too quickly. That’s good that, at least for that painting, you managed to make the water-soluble oil paints work!

Yeah...I think it’s good to go with whatever methods one prefers really, when it comes to doing art for leisure. There’s point in doing something you’re not getting enjoyment from.

This is probably because of how clueless I currently am on different painting techniques!
So far, I’ve had the impression that when using water colour paints it’s pretty much inevitable that the result is going to come out in a loose washy way to a degree. Willing to consider that I’m wrong though!

Offline Emma286

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Re: A few recent sketches
« Reply #19 on: July 30, 2018, 01:45:38 AM »
@Emma286
I like the wolves, absolutely badass

Thank you! I’m glad you liked them. :)

Offline jynnan tonnix

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Re: A few recent sketches
« Reply #20 on: July 30, 2018, 05:47:22 PM »



I know what you mean on acrylic paint drying too quickly. That’s good that, at least for that painting, you managed to make the water-soluble oil paints work!

Yeah...I think it’s good to go with whatever methods one prefers really, when it comes to doing art for leisure. There’s point in doing something you’re not getting enjoyment from.

This is probably because of how clueless I currently am on different painting techniques!
So far, I’ve had the impression that when using water colour paints it’s pretty much inevitable that the result is going to come out in a loose washy way to a degree. Willing to consider that I’m wrong though!

When it comes to watercolor, how "washy" it comes out is dependent on how much water you use to dilute it and whether you work on dry paper or "wet-on-wet". Also, in part, what size rush you use. I tend to prefer a smaller brush, but if they are good quality (preferably red sable), it will still come to a very fine point even if the rush itself isn't tiny.

Not to overwhelm the thread with art (though since that ship may have already sailed I may as well go down with it), here are a couple of my "non-washy" watercolors. These are on the older side as well, having been done at (or shortly after) we were stationed in Scotland (1989-1991). The first one is about as washy as I ever get, and was, if I recall, taken from a photo I took on the ferry going over to Glasgow. You could see more or less the same view from our house, but not quite as close. The second is of my kids (the third one was yet to come) on a little woodland walk we used to enjoy called "Puck's Glen". They are both over 30 now...

Offline Emma286

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Re: A few recent sketches
« Reply #21 on: July 31, 2018, 09:15:18 AM »
No worries on including as much art as you have in here jynnan!  8) I’ve enjoyed seeing it and have found talking about it interesting!

Good to know what you confirmed on the waahiness being dependent on how much water is used to dilute the paint and if the paper is dry or not. Same on the brush size, I’ll bear that in mind!

And great job again on both of those! Particularly like the colour vividness and detail of that second one!  :) Looks like a really nice woodland walking route! I know that some of Scotland has gorgeous scenery (I have been to the Highlands before and Edinburgh though have never yet been to Glasgow).
« Last Edit: July 31, 2018, 09:19:32 AM by Emma286 »

Offline jynnan tonnix

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Re: A few recent sketches
« Reply #22 on: August 01, 2018, 07:02:09 PM »
No worries on including as much art as you have in here jynnan!  8) I’ve enjoyed seeing it and have found talking about it interesting!

Good to know what you confirmed on the waahiness being dependent on how much water is used to dilute the paint and if the paper is dry or not. Same on the brush size, I’ll bear that in mind!

And great job again on both of those! Particularly like the colour vividness and detail of that second one!  :) Looks like a really nice woodland walking route! I know that some of Scotland has gorgeous scenery (I have been to the Highlands before and Edinburgh though have never yet been to Glasgow).

If you are interested in any more tips on watercolor, I find it really important to have a good pencil sketch in place before you start - very lightly, so it can be erased afterwards. If it's light enough, you can erase it even through a light wash, and that should give you enough structure to build up the rest. If you know you will want some areas to stay white, or want white details that are too fine to paint around, get some masking fluid and mask out those areas first. When it dries the paint will not adhere to it, and you can simply rub it off with your finger when you are done. For even finer white details (like some of the water splashing on the rocks in the second painting), you can use a razor knife to gently scrape away some of the color. Wait until you are sure you are done first, though, because it will spoil the surface of the paper for any more paint touch-ups.
Work from the lightest, washiest areas (like the trees with sky showing through them) first, and build up with darker and thicker paint as you go along. This is why the pencil sketch is important to keep you from painting over something in a color that you will not be able to cover up later. Watercolor takes more planning than mediums that you can either erase or cover up mistakes in - it's not very forgiving. But in some ways it is the easiest, too.

Hope you will post any paintings you decide to tackle - I'd be interested in seeing them.

Offline Emma286

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Re: A few recent sketches
« Reply #23 on: August 05, 2018, 04:05:28 AM »
If you are interested in any more tips on watercolor, I find it really important to have a good pencil sketch in place before you start - very lightly, so it can be erased afterwards. If it's light enough, you can erase it even through a light wash, and that should give you enough structure to build up the rest.

If you know you will want some areas to stay white, or want white details that are too fine to paint around, get some masking fluid and mask out those areas first. When it dries the paint will not adhere to it, and you can simply rub it off with your finger when you are done. For even finer white details (like some of the water splashing on the rocks in the second painting), you can use a razor knife to gently scrape away some of the color. Wait until you are sure you are done first, though, because it will spoil the surface of the paper for any more paint touch-ups.

Work from the lightest, washiest areas (like the trees with sky showing through them) first, and build up with darker and thicker paint as you go along. This is why the pencil sketch is important to keep you from painting over something in a color that you will not be able to cover up later. Watercolor takes more planning than mediums that you can either erase or cover up mistakes in - it's not very forgiving. But in some ways it is the easiest, too.

Hope you will post any paintings you decide to tackle - I'd be interested in seeing them.

Those sound like really good ideas jynnan, many thanks. I’ll bear them in mind for a later stage I might be able to give this a go.

I would definitely really like to try painting (watching Bob Ross do a bunch of the paintings he did when still alive has definitely gotten me interested as has seeing what you’ve done here). There is an art thing that I’ve recently started to take part in on Wednesday’s. Right now, when dropping in, I am mainly focusing on the sketching side of things. But I may well decide to try out some water painting during some of the weeks I am there (soon). If I do, and manage to do a half way decent job of any/can snap pictures I’ll upload them here.  :)

Unfortunately, outside of that, don’t have hardly any time right now! Trying to squeeze in time for regular reading and creative writing (particularly with developing haiku writing skills) just now are things that I’m finding challenging enough!

Frustratingly, also now live in a house that’s only really big enough for one person (it’s amongst the tiniest sized houses that you can imagine not exaggerating haha). Not enough room in it to do any painting annoyingly (though a bit of sketching here and there is doable). That said though, once my boyfriend and I have done a bit of re organising in the back garden/one of the back garden sheds later on we might be able to work something out!

It does look a really cool relaxing kind of thing to get into.
« Last Edit: August 05, 2018, 04:10:34 AM by Emma286 »

Offline Emma286

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Re: A few recent sketches
« Reply #24 on: August 05, 2018, 04:36:14 AM »
I guess if you really wanted to you could easily do something like this?[1]



I was watching/listening to this one yesterday. It’s fast become one of my favourite’s! :)
 1. Don’t worry haven’t forgotten that you’re not keen on working with acrylic paints just saying if

Offline Emma286

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Re: A few recent sketches
« Reply #25 on: August 11, 2018, 06:21:33 AM »
If you’re still interested jynnan I have been putting in some practice with eye drawings this week, I will post my latest one here:



I still haven’t entirely mastered this/there are a couple of errors here. Still, thought I’d post this one anyways.!

I’ll leave off posting any more pictures in here though if it’s just the water colour stuff you wanted to see.

Offline jynnan tonnix

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Re: A few recent sketches
« Reply #26 on: August 12, 2018, 07:16:51 PM »
I'm always interested in seeing people's art work.
This is a good start. You might find it helpful to think of the shape of the eyeball itself, and how shadow falls on almost the whole thing. The white of the eye actually  has very little "white" in a drawing; it's shadowed where the or slopes down into the corners of the eye, and especially at the top where the upper lid throws its shadow. You have a nice grasp of the basic shape, though, and the eyelid.
















Offline Emma286

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Re: A few recent sketches
« Reply #27 on: August 13, 2018, 02:38:20 AM »
I'm always interested in seeing people's art work.
This is a good start. You might find it helpful to think of the shape of the eyeball itself, and how shadow falls on almost the whole thing. The white of the eye actually  has very little "white" in a drawing; it's shadowed where the or slopes down into the corners of the eye, and especially at the top where the upper lid throws its shadow. You have a nice grasp of the basic shape, though, and the eyelid.

Glad to hear that Jynnan, Many thanks for taking the time to leave that feedback.

I’ve been checking out some online pictures of eyes recently. Seems to me that how much shadow falls over eyeballs is something that varies! But I can see that, at times, there can be a lot of shadow.

Still, you do have a point. While I did include a bit of a shadow of the eyelashes in the upper right area of the eyeball I am thinking it would have been better to have used a grey or black pencil for that. Though the original eye image I (mainly) worked from used orange (which is why I also did) I have to say I don’t think it’s the best colour choice for that. Reflections of eye lashes are not going to show up as being an orange colour in somebody’s eye. Thinking it’s probably also worth
very lightly) tinting the eyeball grey, to give a duller look. Will also give consideration to what you said on adding more shadow to the eye corners. I can see why that’s good idea.
 
I did include extra shadow shading at the top of the iris though! This was included in the step by step drawing instructions I followed. Is there something wrong with how I did it?

Maybe I didn’t do quite enough of it...


« Last Edit: August 13, 2018, 02:40:15 AM by Emma286 »

Offline jynnan tonnix

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Re: A few recent sketches
« Reply #28 on: August 13, 2018, 03:31:00 PM »
There is always a tendency, it seems, to go pretty lightly with shadow when you are learning. Until you start to acquire more confidence in your drawing, there's that sort of timidity which will show itself in a tendency to stick in the mid-tones of light/shadow. One of the most useful tips I ever got was, "don't be afraid of darks". While it sometimes seems that using darks will make your work look gloomy, it actually is very important in bringing life to it. Without dark enough darks, there's no place to go for enough contrast to make the lights sing.

And, yes, you are right...the direction in which light is hitting the eye, or where the subject is looking, will make a big difference in how much light will show in the white . If you go back and look at my portraits, you will see that the one of Richard Burton has very little shadow because he is looking slightly upward, and the reference photo was also taken from a slightly lower angle. In the drawing of my granddaughter, though, there is virtually no real white in her eyes anywhere but in the highlights on her iris. Of course, babies have proportionally bigger irises vs whites in their eyes, so that's not an entirely fair comparison. But in general, if just doing a study of an eye without other cues as to what direction the light is hitting it, etc, you will find that more shadow will tend to make give more illusion of structure.
« Last Edit: August 13, 2018, 03:37:29 PM by jynnan tonnix »