Author Topic: The First "Americans" Euroasians or Just Europeans?  (Read 137 times)

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Online Nam

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The First "Americans" Euroasians or Just Europeans?
« on: May 15, 2014, 01:43:02 PM »
I found this interesting:
Mystery Solved?

[excerpt]
Quote
BY JOEL ACHENBACH May 15 at 2:00 PM  Follow @JoelAchenbach?

Divers exploring the waters off of Mexico's eastern Yucatán Peninsula recently discovered a near-complete, 12,000-to-13,000-year-old human skeleton hidden deep in a submerged cave system.

The divers found her on a ledge, her skull at rest on an arm bone. Ribs and a broken pelvis lay nearby. She was only 15 years old when she wandered into the cave, perhaps in search of water in an era when the Yucatan was parched. In the darkness she must not have seen the enormous pit looming in front of her.

More than 12,000 years later, in 2007, after the seas had risen and the cave system had filled with water, her skull -- upside down, teeth remarkably intact -- caught the eye of a man in scuba gear.

The divers gave the girl a name: Naia. Her remains may help determine the origins of the earliest Americans and finally solve the mystery of why they looked so dramatically different from the Native Americans of recent millennia.

A paper published Thursday online in the journal Science argues that the discrepancy in appearance between the Paleoamericans and later Native Americans is most likely the result of recent, and relatively rapid, human evolution — and not the result of subsequent migrations of people into the Americas.

Tests on samples of mitochondrial DNA taken from Naia show that she has a genetic marker common today across the Americas, one that scientists say evolved in a prehistoric population that had been isolated for thousand of years in Beringia, the land mass between Alaska and Siberia that formed a bridge between the continents during the Ice Ages.

Thus, according to the new report, the Native Americans and the Paleoamericans are the same people; they just look different because of evolutionary changes.

“This is truly an extraordinary discovery,” said Yemane Asmerom, a University of New Mexico geochemist who is a co-author of the new report. He compared the cave, known as Hoyo Negro (“black hole”), to the Awash Valley of Ethi­o­pia — the site of the 1974 discovery of “Lucy,” an early human ancestor.

Most scientists have assumed that the first humans to come to the Americas crossed over from Eurasia across the Bering land bridge that existed before the oceans rose after the Ice Ages. But there is great debate about whether this represented a single migratory event or multiple pulses of people from different parts of Eurasia and via different routes, including a coastal migration. One maverick theory, based on archeological finds, contends that people came from Europe, following the edge of the ice around the North Atlantic.

-Nam
This thread is about lab-grown dicks, not some mincy, old, British poof of an actor. 

Let's get back on topic, please.


Offline wright

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Re: The First "Americans" Euroasians or Just Europeans?
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2014, 03:47:33 PM »
Very interesting indeed; thanks, Nam. Another piece of a very big puzzle.

The early history of humanity is (surprise, surprise) turning out to be rather more complex than the simplified migration routes most of us vaguely remember from our school texts.
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Online Nam

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Re: The First "Americans" Euroasians or Just Europeans?
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2014, 03:51:02 PM »
Very interesting indeed; thanks, Nam. Another piece of a very big puzzle.

The early history of humanity is (surprise, surprise) turning out to be rather more complex than the simplified migration routes most of us vaguely remember from our school texts.

I was thinking while reading the article that land masses 12,000 years ago probably were closer (but basically where they are today) or there were more islands out there in the Atlantic more visible than today. I mean, I read some where there are still islands in the Atlantic and pacific that no one has yet set foot on.

-Nam
This thread is about lab-grown dicks, not some mincy, old, British poof of an actor. 

Let's get back on topic, please.


Offline relativetruth

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Re: The First "Americans" Euroasians or Just Europeans?
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2014, 04:42:46 PM »
I found this interesting:
Mystery Solved?

[excerpt]
Quote
BY JOEL ACHENBACH May 15 at 2:00 PM  Follow @JoelAchenbach?

A paper published Thursday online in the journal Science argues that discrepancy in appearance between the Paleoamericans and later Native Americans is most likely the result of recent, and relatively rapid, human evolution — and not the result of subsequent migrations of people into the Americas.


-Nam

I agree

If your community has survived the cold of Russia and Alaska for hundreds/thousands of years (with the odd DNA change to help you along the way) and then you get to a place where you can grow (or have access to) vegetables, nuts and stuff. You might expect that a few DNA tweaks would help digest the new foods.

Although Native Americans did not seem to master the Lactose tolerance bit!
« Last Edit: May 15, 2014, 04:46:47 PM by relativetruth »
God(s) exist and are imaginary

Offline wright

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Re: The First "Americans" Euroasians or Just Europeans?
« Reply #4 on: May 15, 2014, 06:15:36 PM »
I was thinking while reading the article that land masses 12,000 years ago probably were closer (but basically where they are today) or there were more islands out there in the Atlantic more visible than today. I mean, I read some where there are still islands in the Atlantic and pacific that no one has yet set foot on.

-Nam

Sure; the latest ice age was ending when humans started getting their act together (improved stone tools and organization, agriculture, etc.). So sea levels would have been a lot lower: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_level_change#Past_changes_in_sea_level
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Offline Graybeard

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Re: The First "Americans" Euroasians or Just Europeans?
« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2014, 08:20:31 AM »
I'm a bit confused here: The original idea what that America was populated by those from Eurasia who crossed from Siberia to America. Now it is thought that America was populated by those from Eurasia who arrived in the area between Siberia to America, lived there for a while and then went on to America. 

I really can't see the difference as I (and I don't think anyone else) thought that thousands started marching from Eurasia and didn't stop until they came to various agreeable parts of America. Prehistoric human migration was always a slow process.
Nobody says “There are many things that we thought were natural processes, but now know that a god did them.”