Author Topic: Why can't/wont god heal amputees?  (Read 7668 times)

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Offline Graybeard

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Re: Why can't/wont god heal amputees?
« Reply #87 on: May 11, 2014, 07:48:43 AM »
My question is related to a bank religion. They tell you your money soul is secure and you trust them. You don't go a visit their vault heaven or ask for the specs of their buildings policy on Salvation or...etc. They basically tells you "give us your money powers of critical thinking" and you say yes.
so again, you just take their word for it. You have no independent evidence by which to demonstrate they can hold your money soul safely. You just have hear-say. And you believe in these claims because you are practicing confirmation bias. You have a pre-commitment.

There, I've fixed it for you.
Nobody says “There are many things that we thought were natural processes, but now know that a god did them.”

Offline median

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Re: Why can't/wont god heal amputees?
« Reply #88 on: May 11, 2014, 08:47:58 AM »
Ok. Miracles are the manifestation of God power in the physical word. So what you want for me is backing up my answer "Miracles happen, even today.
The links and the personal testimony I gave you are not enough to back my claim?
If so :
Do you think that people can get lucky? even today?
If possible could you back up your answer?

I asked you to backup your claims about miracles, with actual evidence (not anecdote or hear-say) and all you came back with was an attempt to change the subject. Could you get anymore dishonest? I wonder if you are actually a psychopath. Do you feel nothing when you are lying for Jesus?

Why are you now, even more dishonestly, attempting to shift the burden of proof (while attempting to change the subject) instead of actually dealing with the rebuttals that are before you?? You have committed at least 4 logical fallacies in this discussion so far (false analogy, argument from incredulity, shifting the burden of proof, and red herring). Why so much squirming and no actual evidence?? Is it really that hard for you to admit that your initial claims about miracles are mistaken and that you do not have the evidence you once thought you had for your belief in them? What is so hard about admitting your own ignorance? Isn't that the more intellectually honest path? If you are unwilling to come clean here then please demonstrate how anyone can independently tell the difference between a miracle and a non-miracle.

Second, I don't know what you mean by "lucky" and I'm not even going to allow you to change the subject, even one more time, until you deal with the rebuttals that myself and others have presented in earlier posts.

Btw, to second Greybeards point (and I noted this earlier) you are attempting a false analogy - trying to compare the natural with the alleged "super"natural. Once again, in regards to a bank we have demonstrable and independently verifiable and explainable examples of banks, tellers, managers, buildings, money, desks, computers, customers service lines, online banking and all the rest. We do not have any examples of a demonstrable "God", "Holy Spirit", "afterlife", "immaterial", "miracle", "demon", or "soul". These are just your assertions which you have asserted without any actual evidence (just hear-say).

Must we actually provide you an example of what evidence looks like? If I claimed their were things called "chairs" - which were seats for a person to sit on which typically consist of 4 legs and a back rest - you could actually go online and find pictures and video of chairs and you could buy one online yourself to verify it, or you could go to a place called "Wal-Mart" and buy one yourself. You could even go into the store and try out these "chairs" first, without buying one. Furthermore, you could have other disinterested and independent people check to see if I'm telling the truth by seeking out chairs in their home towns and reporting back with the data. You could also do a similar procedure with a Liger! It's called actual evidence. That is what you need. In fact, you need mountains of actual evidence because you are making an extraordinary claim and extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. Otherwise...

"That which can be asserted without evidence can be dismissed without evidence."[1]
 1. Christopher Hitchens
« Last Edit: May 11, 2014, 09:20:58 AM by median »
Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. Carl Sagan

Offline Graybeard

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Re: Why can't/wont god heal amputees?
« Reply #89 on: May 11, 2014, 12:34:39 PM »
What rationale could there be behind a god that thinks it is more important to create images of Himself on a Walmart receipt than to heal an amputee?

Nobody says “There are many things that we thought were natural processes, but now know that a god did them.”

Offline Disciple of Sagan

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Re: Why can't/wont god heal amputees?
« Reply #90 on: May 11, 2014, 12:40:10 PM »
Funny, I see Charles Manson. :?

I guess God works in mysterious ways through a company that sells items made by underpaid Chinese laborers.
« Last Edit: May 11, 2014, 12:44:03 PM by Disciple of Sagan »
The cosmos is also within us. We are made of star stuff.

The only thing bigger than the universe is humanity's collective sense of self-importance.

Offline Nam

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Re: Why can't/wont god heal amputees?
« Reply #91 on: May 11, 2014, 01:06:25 PM »
Funny, I see Charles Manson. :?

I guess God works in mysterious ways through a company that sells items made by underpaid Chinese laborers.

Do they speak Mandarin or Cantonese? There's a difference I tell ya, a difference!

;)

-Nam
A god is like a rock: it does absolutely nothing until someone or something forces it to do something. The only capability the rock has is doing nothing until another force compels it physically to move.

The right to be heard does not automatically include the right to be taken seriously - Humphrey

Offline median

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Re: Why can't/wont god heal amputees?
« Reply #92 on: May 11, 2014, 01:42:43 PM »
Funny, I see Charles Manson. :?

I guess God works in mysterious ways through a company that sells items made by underpaid Chinese laborers.

Jesus has a lazy eye?
Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. Carl Sagan

Offline Disciple of Sagan

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Re: Why can't/wont god heal amputees?
« Reply #93 on: May 11, 2014, 02:22:54 PM »


You be the judge. ;)
The cosmos is also within us. We are made of star stuff.

The only thing bigger than the universe is humanity's collective sense of self-importance.

Offline Lukvance

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Re: Why can't/wont god heal amputees?
« Reply #94 on: May 11, 2014, 03:29:15 PM »
Ok. Miracles are the manifestation of God power in the physical word. So what you want for me is backing up my answer "Miracles happen, even today.
The links and the personal testimony I gave you are not enough to back my claim?
If so :
Do you think that people can get lucky? even today?
If possible could you back up your answer?

This goes back to the "cloak and dagger" shit. Any sect can claim some "lucky" event validates their position. Using the erratic path of disease progression is (1) not very verifiable, (2) non sect specific (3) not distinguishable from normal luck.

Essentially, if we look at the evidence that God is supposedly supplying you, then he doesn't really want to be identified, or associated with any sect. If God really wants to be known, he can make the sky rain iguanas, but we are so far away from that level of proof, that it's "cloak and daggers".

If I throw a succession of sixes and win a board game, then this is called luck, but it's obviously not very lucky, and probably not from God. If I throw another 6, then is it from God? Does God only act through really lucky events, and risk showing himself, or does he only work through mundane manipulations? If I was God, I could achieve my purpose through mundane manipulations, without revealing things which were especially "lucky". If I wanted to really reveal myself, I could just turn up and speak to people. Why leave them to guess whether I did something, when I really didn't? Is God taking credit for cures that he didn't do?
So many questions! Not many answer to mine. I feel it's buried So I'll ask again.
Do you think that people can get lucky? even today? (yes or no will suffice)
If possible could you back up your answer? (if can't back up your yes or no that's ok too)
You're worth more than my time

Offline median

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Re: Why can't/wont god heal amputees?
« Reply #95 on: May 11, 2014, 03:34:35 PM »
Please define "luck" in the context by which you are using the term.
Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. Carl Sagan

Offline Lukvance

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Re: Why can't/wont god heal amputees?
« Reply #96 on: May 11, 2014, 03:39:34 PM »
I need you guys to answer these two questions. I am having trouble finding sources that you will accept to prove that "Miracles happen, even today". If you give me source that prove that "Luck happen, even today" or that "Luck doesn't happen" or that "luck never happen" I will then have an Idea on what kind of source are needed to prove my point.

Do you think that people can get lucky? even today? (yes or no will suffice)
If possible could you back up your answer? (if can't back up your yes or no that's ok too)

By luck I mean for example : I was walking down the street and a car was coming at me Luckily someone was there to warn me and I could duck the car. I was lucky that this person was there. I was lucky to have heard her. I am lucky to be alive today.
That kind of luck. Does it help?
You're worth more than my time

Offline Nam

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Re: Why can't/wont god heal amputees?
« Reply #97 on: May 11, 2014, 03:46:21 PM »
Sources would be biased or non-biased statements etc., made by other people other than yourself based on what you state as being factual. We prefer non-biased.

-Nam
A god is like a rock: it does absolutely nothing until someone or something forces it to do something. The only capability the rock has is doing nothing until another force compels it physically to move.

The right to be heard does not automatically include the right to be taken seriously - Humphrey

Offline median

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Re: Why can't/wont god heal amputees?
« Reply #98 on: May 11, 2014, 03:49:38 PM »
I need you guys to answer these two questions. I am having trouble finding sources that you will accept to prove that "Miracles happen, even today". If you give me source that prove that "Luck happen, even today" or that "Luck doesn't happen" or that "luck never happen" I will then have an Idea on what kind of source are needed to prove my point.

Do you think that people can get lucky? even today? (yes or no will suffice)
If possible could you back up your answer? (if can't back up your yes or no that's ok too)

By luck I mean for example : I was walking down the street and a car was coming at me Luckily someone was there to warn me and I could duck the car. I was lucky that this person was there. I was lucky to have heard her. I am lucky to be alive today.
That kind of luck. Does it help?

No, it doesn't. You didn't actually provide a definition for the way in which you are using that term. We just see that you are trying to turn the tables and shift the burden of proof (which is a logical fallacy). Why are you so vehemently avoiding actually demonstrating these alleged miracles you claim? You certainly are squirming a lot for someone making such extraordinary claims. It's awfully suspicious of both your motives and the nature of your claims themselves. If you were a salesman standing at my door, attempting these kind of verbal tricks and obfuscations, the conservation would have been over by now and I would have shut the door. The funny part is, it's likely that if a salesman were standing at your door making these kinds of extraordinary claims you wouldn't accept these kinds of attempts at avoidance either. The minute that the guy started hedging, hesitating, and/or not complying (like you are doing now) the skeptical shields would (rightly) go up. Why are you not practicing your skepticism consistently?


http://forums.philosophyforums.com/threads/does-luck-exist-what-is-luck-45785.html

I'm going to anticipate a possible response by you by simply noting that Occam's Razor eliminates any aspect of an attempted explanation which includes greater or unnecessary assumptions. So, if you attempt to argue that "God" (whatever that word means or refers to) 'controls everything' then you are making the greater assumption b/c we do not need that assumption to explain the universe as it behaves and operates. Please keep this in mind while providing your definition of "luck". 
« Last Edit: May 11, 2014, 04:45:39 PM by median »
Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. Carl Sagan

Offline Lukvance

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Re: Why can't/wont god heal amputees?
« Reply #99 on: May 11, 2014, 04:56:28 PM »
Luck : "events that influence one's life and are seemingly beyond one's control" or "a purposeless, unpredictable and uncontrollable force that shapes events favorably or unfavorably for an individual, group or cause"
For example : I was walking down the street and a car was coming at me Luckily someone was there to warn me and I could duck the car. I was lucky that this person was there. I was lucky to have heard her. I am lucky to be alive today.
You're worth more than my time

Offline Defiance

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Re: Why can't/wont god heal amputees?
« Reply #100 on: May 11, 2014, 04:57:51 PM »
Luck : "events that influence one's life and are seemingly beyond one's control" or "a purposeless, unpredictable and uncontrollable force that shapes events favorably or unfavorably for an individual, group or cause"
For example : I was walking down the street and a car was coming at me Luckily someone was there to warn me and I could duck the car. I was lucky that this person was there. I was lucky to have heard her. I am lucky to be alive today.
So a synonym of Fortunate.
"God is just and fair"
*God kills 2.5 million of people he KNEW would turn out like this in the flood*
*Humanity turns bad again, when God knew it would*
We should feel guilty for this.

Offline Lukvance

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Re: Why can't/wont god heal amputees?
« Reply #101 on: May 11, 2014, 05:14:11 PM »
Luck : "events that influence one's life and are seemingly beyond one's control" or "a purposeless, unpredictable and uncontrollable force that shapes events favorably or unfavorably for an individual, group or cause"
For example : I was walking down the street and a car was coming at me Luckily someone was there to warn me and I could duck the car. I was lucky that this person was there. I was lucky to have heard her. I am lucky to be alive today.
So a synonym of Fortunate.
Yes, if you want.
You're worth more than my time

Offline median

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Re: Why can't/wont god heal amputees?
« Reply #102 on: May 11, 2014, 08:47:27 PM »
I am having trouble finding sources that you will accept to prove that "Miracles happen, even today".

That right there should give you pause and make you skeptical of these miracle claims.
Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. Carl Sagan

Offline Defiance

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Re: Why can't/wont god heal amputees?
« Reply #103 on: May 11, 2014, 08:49:45 PM »
Luk is about to say "Well im sorry then if my evidence isnt good enoguh for you, its good enough for me."
"God is just and fair"
*God kills 2.5 million of people he KNEW would turn out like this in the flood*
*Humanity turns bad again, when God knew it would*
We should feel guilty for this.

Offline median

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Re: Why can't/wont god heal amputees?
« Reply #104 on: May 11, 2014, 09:29:22 PM »
What evidence? He hasn't given any evidence - just hear-say and attempts to shift the burden of proof.
Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. Carl Sagan

Online ParkingPlaces

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Re: Why can't/wont god heal amputees?
« Reply #105 on: May 11, 2014, 11:10:13 PM »
In any given event for which multiple outcomes are possible, we humans sometimes experience better results than expected, or we have no trouble seeing that the outcome could have been worse, and, since we are humans, we label the above-average outcomes as good luck. The law of averages dictates that sometimes good stuff will happen, sometimes neutral stuff will happen, sometimes bad stuff will happen.

My brother taught his two children to run immediately if he ever yelled the word "Run" at the top of his voice. One day on the side of a very icy street he saw a car sliding towards his 8 year old son. He yelled "Run!", and his son, whose back was turned to the car, started running just as he'd been trained, luckily away from the road, and hence he narrowly but successfully missed being squished between the moving car and a parked one.

Was that luck? Or was it preparation and training?

One of the most religious people I've ever known used to be married. He and his equally religious wife were driving down the highway when a 50 ton boulder fell over on their car and squished her flat. Was he lucky to survive? Was it just bad luck that she didn't? Or was the event merely one of the possible outcomes, and since the outcome sucked, we say it was "bad luck" instead of "good luck".

When I was in the military, getting my training as an electronic technician, I had to take a one week course in military paperwork. I flunked the class and had to take it over, which meant I had to stay a week longer before I could graduate the course and get my assignment. Everyone in the class I flunked out of was sent to SE Asia, most directly to the war, while the class I ended up in all went to Europe, and I spent the rest of my enlistment in England instead of having to dodge bullets.

Did I have bad luck that caused good luck, and did the person who went to Vietnam in my place have only bad luck? Or did each part of that story have many possible outcomes, so that I merely experienced one of the better possibilities?

I was an atheist when I didn't go to Vietnam, and I've been an atheist every time I've driven down a mountain road with lots of boulders and things have worked out pretty well for me in those two departments. So presumably no gods have been involved.

Luck is a word we humans use to label the better-quality outcomes in life. We have ways to describe the bad outcomes as well. But the words aren't factual, they are merely descriptive words, that we use for our convenience, and sometimes our comfort. Yes, some people have more of it than others, but the law of averages explains that quite well. There is no reason for everyone to have an equal share in the more desirable outcome department. There is way too much random stuff going on to allow for pleasant consistencies.

Enjoy luck all you want. Just don't plan on it. Nor should you expect it unconditionally. Just be happy when you don't get squished and try to make adjustments in your lifestyle, when possible, so that you are less likely to be in that position in the future.

And don't think for a second that it is an important part of reality that can be manipulated by your hopes and/or prayers.
Not everyone is entitled to their own opinion. They're all entitled to mine though.

Offline Lukvance

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Re: Why can't/wont god heal amputees?
« Reply #106 on: May 11, 2014, 11:32:34 PM »
In any given event for which multiple outcomes are possible, we humans sometimes experience better results than expected, or we have no trouble seeing that the outcome could have been worse, and, since we are humans, we label the above-average outcomes as good luck. The law of averages dictates that sometimes good stuff will happen, sometimes neutral stuff will happen, sometimes bad stuff will happen.

My brother taught his two children to run immediately if he ever yelled the word "Run" at the top of his voice. One day on the side of a very icy street he saw a car sliding towards his 8 year old son. He yelled "Run!", and his son, whose back was turned to the car, started running just as he'd been trained, luckily away from the road, and hence he narrowly but successfully missed being squished between the moving car and a parked one.

Was that luck? Or was it preparation and training?

One of the most religious people I've ever known used to be married. He and his equally religious wife were driving down the highway when a 50 ton boulder fell over on their car and squished her flat. Was he lucky to survive? Was it just bad luck that she didn't? Or was the event merely one of the possible outcomes, and since the outcome sucked, we say it was "bad luck" instead of "good luck".

When I was in the military, getting my training as an electronic technician, I had to take a one week course in military paperwork. I flunked the class and had to take it over, which meant I had to stay a week longer before I could graduate the course and get my assignment. Everyone in the class I flunked out of was sent to SE Asia, most directly to the war, while the class I ended up in all went to Europe, and I spent the rest of my enlistment in England instead of having to dodge bullets.

Did I have bad luck that caused good luck, and did the person who went to Vietnam in my place have only bad luck? Or did each part of that story have many possible outcomes, so that I merely experienced one of the better possibilities?

I was an atheist when I didn't go to Vietnam, and I've been an atheist every time I've driven down a mountain road with lots of boulders and things have worked out pretty well for me in those two departments. So presumably no gods have been involved.

Luck is a word we humans use to label the better-quality outcomes in life. We have ways to describe the bad outcomes as well. But the words aren't factual, they are merely descriptive words, that we use for our convenience, and sometimes our comfort. Yes, some people have more of it than others, but the law of averages explains that quite well. There is no reason for everyone to have an equal share in the more desirable outcome department. There is way too much random stuff going on to allow for pleasant consistencies.

Enjoy luck all you want. Just don't plan on it. Nor should you expect it unconditionally. Just be happy when you don't get squished and try to make adjustments in your lifestyle, when possible, so that you are less likely to be in that position in the future.

And don't think for a second that it is an important part of reality that can be manipulated by your hopes and/or prayers.
Those a great stories. Makes you think. Thank you for sharing.
Now back to the discussion:
Do you think that people can get lucky? even today? (yes or no will suffice)
If possible could you back up your answer? (if can't back up your yes or no that's ok too)
You're worth more than my time

Offline skeptic54768

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Re: Why can't/wont god heal amputees?
« Reply #107 on: May 12, 2014, 12:39:23 AM »
What rationale could there be behind a god that thinks it is more important to create images of Himself on a Walmart receipt than to heal an amputee?

1. Do you believe that God is obligated to cater to us like a gumball machine?
(Be careful if you answer yes to this question. The consequences are dire.)

2. Do you believe that God views our physical bodies as being more important than our immaterial non-physical souls?

3. Do you believe that God thinks it's bad to be an amputee?
« Last Edit: May 12, 2014, 12:41:10 AM by skeptic54768 »
Matthew 10:22 "and you will be hated by all for my name’s sake. But the one who endures to the end will be saved." - Jesus (said 2,000 years ago and still true today.)

Offline Astreja

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Re: Why can't/wont god heal amputees?
« Reply #108 on: May 12, 2014, 01:44:27 AM »
Do you think that people can get lucky? even today? (yes or no will suffice)
If possible could you back up your answer? (if can't back up your yes or no that's ok too)

I think that "luck" is largely a matter of positioning oneself strategically in order to be close to possible opportunities or solutions.  IMO, just about anyone can do it, but they have to know their strengths, their weaknesses, what they want, and what they're willing to do to get it.  With all of the above (strengths, etc.) luck approaches inevitability.  Lack of self-knowledge, including not being honest with oneself, will sabotage the process.  Contradictory or constantly changing desires make luck a very elusive target indeed.

(Disclaimer:  I have a remarkable talent for getting what I want, and experience a lot of synchronicity at opportune moments, but haven't formally tested the above hypothesis.)
Reality Checkroom — Not Responsible for Lost Articles

Offline Lukvance

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Re: Why can't/wont god heal amputees?
« Reply #109 on: May 12, 2014, 01:48:14 AM »
I think that "luck" is largely a matter of positioning oneself strategically in order to be close to possible opportunities or solutions.  IMO, just about anyone can do it, but they have to know their strengths, their weaknesses, what they want, and what they're willing to do to get it.  With all of the above (strengths, etc.) luck approaches inevitability.  Lack of self-knowledge, including not being honest with oneself, will sabotage the process.  Contradictory or constantly changing desires make luck a very elusive target indeed.

(Disclaimer:  I have a remarkable talent for getting what I want, and experience a lot of synchronicity at opportune moments, but haven't formally tested the above hypothesis.)
Yeah but do you think that people (not only you) can get lucky?
You're worth more than my time

Offline Astreja

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Re: Why can't/wont god heal amputees?
« Reply #110 on: May 12, 2014, 01:54:30 AM »
Yeah but do you think that people (not only you) can get lucky?

Yes, I do.  I don't see anything supernatural or divine about what I'm doing -- It's one part clarity, one part stability and focus, and whatever physical or mental effort the goal demands.
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Offline Lukvance

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Re: Why can't/wont god heal amputees?
« Reply #111 on: May 12, 2014, 02:00:13 AM »
Yeah but do you think that people (not only you) can get lucky?

Yes, I do.  I don't see anything supernatural or divine about what I'm doing -- It's one part clarity, one part stability and focus, and whatever physical or mental effort the goal demands.
could you backup your answer?
You're worth more than my time

Offline Graybeard

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Re: Why can't/wont god heal amputees?
« Reply #112 on: May 12, 2014, 05:25:17 AM »
What rationale could there be behind a god that thinks it is more important to create images of Himself on a Walmart receipt than to heal an amputee?

1. Do you believe that God is obligated to cater to us like a gumball machine?
(Be careful if you answer yes to this question. The consequences are dire.)

2. Do you believe that God views our physical bodies as being more important than our immaterial non-physical souls?

3. Do you believe that God thinks it's bad to be an amputee?
You did not answer my question: could you have another attempt?
Nobody says “There are many things that we thought were natural processes, but now know that a god did them.”

Offline Graybeard

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Re: Why can't/wont god heal amputees?
« Reply #113 on: May 12, 2014, 05:50:02 AM »
Luck : "events that influence one's life and are seemingly beyond one's control" or "a purposeless, unpredictable and uncontrollable force that shapes events favorably or unfavorably for an individual, group or cause"
For example : I was walking down the street and a car was coming at me Luckily someone was there to warn me and I could duck the car. I was lucky that this person was there. I was lucky to have heard her. I am lucky to be alive today.
You may have heard someone say, “I have a lucky coin.” When they say this they mean that they have an irrational belief that the coin will somehow give them “luck.”

Then in your example, we see the other meaning/use, where it is used to describe the quality of a set of circumstances, as in your example.

When we consider the nature of “Luck” it is important to realise that luck is a concept - it is a description - not a reality. Luck is a word that is used to describe a set of circumstances that turn out to be more advantageous than we imagine might have been the case when compared to another possible outcome.

However, we know there is no such thing as a “lucky coin” – how could it work? It would have to change all the laws of the universe to our benefit.

We know that in your example, the circumstances were simply that you heard something, reacted, and were not hit.

We do not say, "Luckily 2+2=4, otherwise my calculation would not have worked."

Christians often do not think critically about what they say, and they imagine that abstract ideas have a real existence. Atheists use expressions like “I was lucky” but they understand that this is simply an idiom, and that “luck” does not really exist.

Your question should be, “Do you understand the concept of “luck”?” and the answer will be “Yes”, I understand it in the same way that I understand the concept of a deity, a unicorn or a dragon.

You will have heard that famous quote by the golfer Gary Player: “The harder I practice, the luckier I get.”

I think that this explains well the concept of luck and gives us a definition upon both you and we can agree.

Nobody says “There are many things that we thought were natural processes, but now know that a god did them.”

Offline Astreja

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Re: Why can't/wont god heal amputees?
« Reply #114 on: May 12, 2014, 10:26:37 AM »
could you backup your answer?

About My version of "luck" being non-supernatural, you mean?  Well, it never seems to violate any scientific principles, and it's directly proportional to how much focused thought and effort I put in.  It appears to be a form of autosuggestion or pattern recognition.  As I said, I haven't conducted any tests to validate or falsify the hypothesis.
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Offline Lukvance

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Re: Why can't/wont god heal amputees?
« Reply #115 on: May 12, 2014, 11:40:14 AM »
You may have heard someone say, “I have a lucky coin.” When they say this they mean that they have an irrational belief that the coin will somehow give them “luck.”

Then in your example, we see the other meaning/use, where it is used to describe the quality of a set of circumstances, as in your example.

When we consider the nature of “Luck” it is important to realise that luck is a concept - it is a description - not a reality. Luck is a word that is used to describe a set of circumstances that turn out to be more advantageous than we imagine might have been the case when compared to another possible outcome.

However, we know there is no such thing as a “lucky coin” – how could it work? It would have to change all the laws of the universe to our benefit.

We know that in your example, the circumstances were simply that you heard something, reacted, and were not hit.

We do not say, "Luckily 2+2=4, otherwise my calculation would not have worked."

Christians often do not think critically about what they say, and they imagine that abstract ideas have a real existence. Atheists use expressions like “I was lucky” but they understand that this is simply an idiom, and that “luck” does not really exist.

Your question should be, “Do you understand the concept of “luck”?” and the answer will be “Yes”, I understand it in the same way that I understand the concept of a deity, a unicorn or a dragon.

You will have heard that famous quote by the golfer Gary Player: “The harder I practice, the luckier I get.”

I think that this explains well the concept of luck and gives us a definition upon both you and we can agree.
Do you feel that you gave enough information to backup your answer? (as i understand, and feel free to correct me if I'm wrong, your answer is Yes people can get lucky) That your answer is not based on hearsay or anecdotes. That you gave us enough evidence?
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