Author Topic: Jeremy England has a new theory on the origins of life  (Read 256 times)

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Offline Jag

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Jeremy England has a new theory on the origins of life
« on: January 23, 2014, 09:56:17 AM »
He uses the word "theory" correctly and everything.

It was inevitable

Some of the science involved is beyond me, but the basic principle makes enough sense to me to be able to figure out what he's after. It will be fascinating to see what the outcome of the pending experiments shows.
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Online jaimehlers

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Re: Jeremy England has a new theory on the origins of life
« Reply #1 on: January 23, 2014, 12:39:58 PM »
That makes a surprising amount of sense.

Online wright

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Re: Jeremy England has a new theory on the origins of life
« Reply #2 on: January 23, 2014, 01:10:48 PM »
Fascinating. So abiogenesis is, in this theory, a nearly-inevitable consequence.

Years ago I read a book (both title and author escape me, unfortunately) about life's evolution and origins. The writer (who wasn't a theist, IIRC) speculated that there might be "laws of complexity" that led to the formation of self-replicating molecules and ultimately organisms as we know them now. England's theory might be something like that.

And the nice thing about it is it's testable. Even if it turns out to be incorrect, that in itself would be interesting; we could eliminate that particular line of inquiry from abiogenesis research and concentrate on others.
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Offline screwtape

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Re: Jeremy England has a new theory on the origins of life
« Reply #3 on: January 23, 2014, 01:17:34 PM »
Fascinating. So abiogenesis is, in this theory, a nearly-inevitable consequence.

After I read a book on chaos theory, I kind of assumed this was the case.
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Online Nam

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Re: Jeremy England has a new theory on the origins of life
« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2014, 12:30:28 AM »
Fascinating. So abiogenesis is, in this theory, a nearly-inevitable consequence.

After I read a book on chaos theory, I kind of assumed this was the case.

I just watched the movie.

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Offline magicmiles

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Re: Jeremy England has a new theory on the origins of life
« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2014, 12:44:10 AM »
Is it just me or do male academics under the age of 40 have much thinner beards than, say, mechanics or builders of a simialr age?

Once you've pondered this, please feel free to resume your seriosu discussion of serious science which is, of course, way beyond my ken.
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Online Nam

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Re: Jeremy England has a new theory on the origins of life
« Reply #6 on: January 24, 2014, 12:47:24 AM »
Is it just me or do male academics under the age of 40 have much thinner beards than, say, mechanics or builders of a simialr age?

Once you've pondered this, please feel free to resume your seriosu discussion of serious science which is, of course, way beyond my ken.

"I just watched the movie" -- not serious, and also way above my head. But it is a way to bookmark without putting "bm" which I actually dislike doing.

-Nam
A god is like a rock: it does absolutely nothing until someone or something forces it to do something. The only capability the rock has is doing nothing until another force compels it physically to move.

The right to be heard does not automatically include the right to be taken seriously - Humphrey