Author Topic: Why Christians still take measures against death?  (Read 731 times)

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Offline SevenPatch

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Re: Why Christians still take measures against death?
« Reply #29 on: January 26, 2014, 01:28:13 AM »


We are not experiencing the different plane of existence yet.

Correct.  We are experiencing life though right?  After we die, we will experience the other plane of existence right?  If the answer to both questions is yes, then our experiences will last for eternity, therefor we are experiencing eternity already.


How is it a problem if God exists? God can still be considered loving just like a parent is still loving even if they decide to bring a child into this world. If this world is so full of evil, then logically, you shouldn't have kids.

If you have a child that ends up in jail, is it your fault for having the child in the first place?

Why do you think comparing the morals of a mere human mortal to a perfect being has any argumenitive power?

Haven't you said that God is perfect?

Is the world perfect the way it is?  If so then I guess no one is going to hell.

If not, how does a perfect being like God tolerate imperfection? Or, why would a perfect being create imperfection?  Is God not capable of creating perfection?

Maybe God is no better than a mere human mortal.  Of course that would make sense since humans project themselves as God and humans are far from capable of solving the "Problem of Evil".
"Shut him up! We have a lot invested in this ride - SHUT HIM UP! Look at my furrows of worry! Look at my big bank account, and my family! This just HAS to be real!" - Bill Hicks

Offline Anfauglir

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Re: Why Christians still take measures against death?
« Reply #30 on: January 26, 2014, 02:48:27 AM »
If you have a child that ends up in jail, is it your fault for having the child in the first place?

Normally?  No, not for simply having the child.

For god? Yes.  Because as you've said many times, your god has the right to do anything with us - and with that comes the responsibility for anything and everything we do.  So yes - every "crime" committed by man is the direct responsibility of your god.
Just because you've always done it that way doesn't mean it's not incredibly stupid.
Why is it so hard for believers to answer a direct question?

Offline junebug72

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Re: Why Christians still take measures against death?
« Reply #31 on: January 26, 2014, 06:11:33 AM »
In your view OCG is making a choice to sin not a selfish act? Given an example like that of the cookie jar. You know it is a wrong choice, but are compelled by no outside pressure but you do so anyways. In this, like many other sins theists choose to do are purely selfish acts.

Yes, consciously choosing to sin is a selfish act.

As always,

OldChurchGuy

Is there such a thing as unconsciously choosing to sin?

Curious,

JB
Belief in a cruel God makes a cruel man.
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Offline OldChurchGuy

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Re: Why Christians still take measures against death?
« Reply #32 on: January 26, 2014, 06:21:33 AM »
In your view OCG is making a choice to sin not a selfish act? Given an example like that of the cookie jar. You know it is a wrong choice, but are compelled by no outside pressure but you do so anyways. In this, like many other sins theists choose to do are purely selfish acts.

Yes, consciously choosing to sin is a selfish act.

As always,

OldChurchGuy

Is there such a thing as unconsciously choosing to sin?

Curious,

JB

To be honest, I am not sure.  I can't imagine such a scenario but that doesn't guarantee anything. 

Sincerely,

OldChurchGuy
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Offline One Above All

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Re: Why Christians still take measures against death?
« Reply #33 on: January 26, 2014, 06:24:20 AM »
To be honest, I am not sure.  I can't imagine such a scenario but that doesn't guarantee anything. 

Imagine someone doing something bad, but not realizing it until the action had already been taken.

Sincerely,

OldChurchGuy

Same here,

One
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Offline junebug72

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Re: Why Christians still take measures against death?
« Reply #34 on: January 26, 2014, 06:29:00 AM »
In your view OCG is making a choice to sin not a selfish act? Given an example like that of the cookie jar. You know it is a wrong choice, but are compelled by no outside pressure but you do so anyways. In this, like many other sins theists choose to do are purely selfish acts.

Yes, consciously choosing to sin is a selfish act.

As always,

OldChurchGuy

Is there such a thing as unconsciously choosing to sin?

Curious,

JB

Please pardon my interruption guys.  This thread has caught my eye. 

If I may, this cookie jar example is another example of how religion makes God unbelievable.  IMO, God gave capacity for pleasure.  Now I believe these things were given so that we can enjoy life.  Cookies are good.  I'm not hurting anyone but myself if I eat too many.  I mean no matter how much exercise, nutrition or celibacy we endure you're still going to die. 

Imagine when you get to the afterlife finding out none of this self sacrifice was necessary!  I'm sure it is commended and appreciated but necessary, I don't think so.

Just don't hurt others.  I think that is the Cardinal rule we should all follow.

My point here is that a God that would design us with temptation and then condemn for giving in to it is petty and cruel.  We are the one's that only have 4 mins..

I don't think we should spend that time worrying about how many cookies we eat or our sexual preferences as long as they do not hurt others.  That 4 mins is a gift not a curse, IMO.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2014, 06:31:24 AM by junebug72 »
Belief in a cruel God makes a cruel man.
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Offline nogodsforme

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Re: Why Christians still take measures against death?
« Reply #35 on: January 26, 2014, 10:14:28 PM »
skeptic, when you say there is no "problem of evil"  are you saying that there is no such thing as evil? Or are you saying that there is evil, but it has nothing to do with god, therefore it is not a problem?

I don't think the world is "perfectly fine". Nor do I think the world is "fallen and full of sin". The world is what it is, with both good and bad things, neither a paradise or a hell for most people.[1] 

I don't have any problem wrapping my mind around the world having good as well as bad things. Science has helped us to understand the world and made many of the bad things better. So, the "problem of evil" is not really a problem for atheists: the world is what it is, remember?

It is the people who say the whole universe was made special for us humans by a perfect loving god who have to account for all the bad things, the stuff that hurts and kills us, the fact that the universe is actually hostile to human life. That is what is confusing and leads to people doubting religion, all the apologetics and bad parent analogies

Side point-- you still seem to be confusing atheists (people who don't think that there is a god) with nihilists (people who don't think life has any meaning). It would be a good question to ask a nihilist why have kids or do anything at all. But that question makes no sense to an atheist. I am not a nihilist. I am an atheist and I think that life has tons of meaning. Just not any meaning that comes from a supernatural being.  Life has meaning because we give it meaning.

Giving a good lecture to a class, watching my kid grow up, talking with my husband, laughing with my sister, having a nice dinner, watching the new Sherlock series, enjoying my doggies, helping people who need it, learning more about science, esp evolution, playing with my friends' babies, knitting, trying to lose weight, looking forward to spring, trying to make the world a better place by doing lefty political stuff, attempting without much success to ignore the Superbowl (cute quarterback of color Russell Manning!!!!), looking at animals on cuteoverload, writing fan fiction stories-- and blogging on this site-- all that and more gives meaning to my life.

 1. Unless you are in a North Korean prison camp, that is pretty close to hell.
Extraordinary claims of the bible don't even have ordinary evidence.

Kids aren't paying attention most of the time in science classes so it seems silly to get worked up over ID being taught in schools.