Author Topic: The Voice  (Read 207 times)

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Offline Nam

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The Voice
« on: October 06, 2013, 04:38:42 PM »
I ran across this version of the Bible (The Voice) a few days ago. Reminds me of The Message, talking to its readers as children, perhaps for children.

Some commentary from it:

Ecclesiastes:
Quote
The contrast between God and humanity could not be starker. The teacher drives this point home by reminding his reader that human lives and earthly accomplishments are fleeting. Nothing tangible is permanent. No work lasts. It all slips away and vanishes into thin air. Compare that to God. Everything God does is substantial. Everything God accomplishes lasts forever. Every word God speaks makes a difference. And so, God places within every person a sense of eternity to know yet not understand Him. This world with all its goodness and beauty is not as good as it gets. There is more, so much more, and we are made for that reality too. But not now, not yet.

Basically, why learn anything, you won't be remembered for it. A book teaching its follows, basically, to be stupid because either way they gain nothing so why work to be smart, or wise, or anything. Hell, if I were a child being taught this passage in school, I'd leave. Not because I disagree (or agree) with it but because I'm being taught: what does it matter?

For the commentary of Matthew 10:34:
Quote
Jesus calls His disciples to a radical commitment. Those who truly follow Jesus must be willing to follow Him to the point of death, just as He will later die for His commitment to God and others. Thus, whether they die literally or figuratively, His followers give up their lives for Him.

But the thing is: that's not what says, except for the "radical" part. Soldiers obey their commanders, protect their fellow soldiers, and at the same time themselves yet are willing to risk their lives for all and they didn't have to hate anyone because of such a stance nor love anyone less.

Yet, Christians have to hate everyone, including themselves, and give their life and others for the love of one man or one god.

Sad.

These versions of the Bible are either becoming more diluted or more radical in their interpretations. I don't know which, perhaps both.

Just sad.

-Nam
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Offline wright

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Re: The Voice
« Reply #1 on: October 07, 2013, 02:35:04 PM »
Basically, why learn anything, you won't be remembered for it. A book teaching its follows, basically, to be stupid because either way they gain nothing so why work to be smart, or wise, or anything. Hell, if I were a child being taught this passage in school, I'd leave. Not because I disagree (or agree) with it but because I'm being taught: what does it matter?

Makes me realize that cognitive dissonance has to be taught early on and reinforced, otherwise kids will think that line of reasoning through and come to exactly that conclusion.

So if you teach a child that god loves them but will condemn them to eternal torment if they don't love him back, created the world from nothing but had to use a flood to kill all the bad people in the world, and has always existed and never changes while still feeling things like love and hate... Once they accept these blatant contradictions, then the doors of reason and logic are quick to rust shut.

These versions of the Bible are either becoming more diluted or more radical in their interpretations. I don't know which, perhaps both.

Just sad.

-Nam

You could probably find at least some Christians who would agree with you. Despite the literalists' protestations, the Bible has changed considerably since being first set in print. And even literalists will disagree over interpreting the same parts of scripture, because there is no universally-recognized method among Christians for discerning if the scripture in question is allegorical or literal.

I'm not even sure if "radical" and "diluted" apply. What's the baseline Bible you're using for comparison? As I see it, the Bible began changing as soon as it transitioned from oral tradition to written form and hasn't stopped since. Like all other human literature, it and how it's perceived change according to the needs of the people who see it as important.
Live a good life... If there are no gods, then you will be gone, but will have lived a noble life that will live on in the memories of your loved ones. I am not afraid.
--Marcus Aurelius

Offline Nam

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Re: The Voice
« Reply #2 on: October 07, 2013, 03:06:59 PM »
If one is basing their version on the first, or widely accepted English-translated Bible (KJV[1]), then one would presume that the verse would be closely related to the base book but they never are; they always take it a step further, and change the whole meaning to say something else. That's, in my opinion, diluting the original[2] Bible, and either making it more "apple pie", or more dark and violent than it may have been intended to be.

You really don't see other religions doing this with their scripture. Yes, the interpretations may be slight but they, unlike Christians, don't take it to other levels beyond any sensible conclusion.

-Nam
 1. which if you look in most of these re-translated versions, that's what they cite; even the Book of Mormon tends to cite the KJV, which is ironic.
 2. in their collective viewpoint
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