Author Topic: Personal revelation--subtle, but important  (Read 249 times)

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Offline Boots

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Personal revelation--subtle, but important
« on: September 16, 2013, 10:19:38 PM »
I've got some relatives who are right-wingers, like hardcore.  (we're talking "Glen Beck really knows what he's talking about!" hardcore)  One of them insinuated himself into a Facebook post I made, which linked to a study that examined how many scientific articles which took a stand on global warming/climate change supported human-influenced climate change vs. those that rejected it.  The percentages are staggering: 97% support in one study, 99.5% or something in another.  one of my relative's posts said something to the effect of "Science doesn't require peer review; only publishing in a scientific journal does"  Another said "science doesn't require a consensus."

what makes it staggering that he'd take these views (particularly the first) is that he's an engineer for a prestigious company in the USA.  He used to work for a different prestigious research company (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute).  And he doesn't think science requires peer review (and the implication is that he doesn't see the value in such a strong consensus).

What the effing eff?!?!

Between exchanges like that, and reading a little more about liberalism, I came to a conclusion.  I used to say "I lean a little left," but that's not entirely accurate.  I lean AWAY from the right.

It seems that, in the USA, the (radical) right is so wrong-headed and disingenuous on so many issues (economics, religion, climate/environment, women's health) that I can't understand how so many folks are so rabidly FOR this stuff.  There is also the problem of their seeming to want everyone to have a say in all things--including non-scientists weighing in on science.  This is an extremely liberal concept, unless I miss my guess...(feel free to correct me)

Not sure I have much of a point, except that I'd appreciate insight as to whether I'm bonkers here, and/or how anyone can actually swallow the crap spewed forth by the American Wrong.
* Religion: institutionalized superstition, period.

"Many of my ultra-conservative Republican friends...have trouble accepting the idea God is not a Republican. " ~OldChurchGuy

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Offline ParkingPlaces

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Re: Personal revelation--subtle, but important
« Reply #1 on: September 16, 2013, 10:30:00 PM »
I suggest that we have congress vote on whether the law of gravity should be repealed. And when it is, we'll of course all float away and the problem will be solved.

Not everyone is entitled to their opinion. They're all entitled to mine though.

Offline Nam

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Re: Personal revelation--subtle, but important
« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2013, 10:35:54 PM »
I suggest that we have congress vote on whether the law of gravity should be repealed. And when it is, we'll of course all float away and the problem will be solved.



Just don't tell them that space has gravity, they might think you're a nut.

;)

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This is my signature "Nam", don't I have nice typing skills?

Offline Willie

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Re: Personal revelation--subtle, but important
« Reply #3 on: September 16, 2013, 10:49:37 PM »
Engineers have to learn quite a bit of science on the way to their degrees, but they are not scientists. Nor is engineering, impressive and respectable though it may be, all that similar to the practice of science. In my experience, even highly talented and competent engineers can still be astoundingly irrational when it comes to matters that intersect with politics or religion. It may be that very intelligent people are better equipped to see through irrational beliefs. But it also seems that a brilliant mind set to the task of rationalizing such beliefs can be very good at it. The engineers that I've worked with have tended to be either agnostic and mildly liberal, or far right fundamentalist, with practically no one in between.

Offline Boots

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Re: Personal revelation--subtle, but important
« Reply #4 on: September 17, 2013, 10:30:43 AM »
Engineers have to learn quite a bit of science on the way to their degrees, but they are not scientists. Nor is engineering, impressive and respectable though it may be, all that similar to the practice of science. In my experience, even highly talented and competent engineers can still be astoundingly irrational when it comes to matters that intersect with politics or religion. It may be that very intelligent people are better equipped to see through irrational beliefs. But it also seems that a brilliant mind set to the task of rationalizing such beliefs can be very good at it. The engineers that I've worked with have tended to be either agnostic and mildly liberal, or far right fundamentalist, with practically no one in between.

Funny, but I always lumped engineers in with scientists without really thinking about it too much.  I guess Big Bang Theory is too influential on my paltry brain.
* Religion: institutionalized superstition, period.

"Many of my ultra-conservative Republican friends...have trouble accepting the idea God is not a Republican. " ~OldChurchGuy

"We humans may never figure out the truth, but I prefer trying to find it over pretending we know it."  ~ParkingPlaces