Author Topic: The Things I've Learned  (Read 873 times)

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Offline Avascar

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The Things I've Learned
« on: August 18, 2013, 01:11:07 AM »
Long time no see. As you might have known, I came here formally a christian with ridiculous threads. Just to keep the past short, I came here to attempt and understand an atheist's perspective on life (if not, I don't know why I came here). Now well, I'll go on explaining on the things I've learned throughout the years. I've been on a 3 year or so hiatus, and learned many things. You can certainly say, this forum was one of the things that started my journey on learning philosophy, God, and all sorts of garbage I found on the internet.

Although there is harm in believing in Christianity, Catholicism, or any sort of organized religion. Sincerely because it limits your mind, creating a core belief that you subconsciously follow. And whatever that opposes it, will bring in unhappy results, but it's different for everybody. The perspectives of life is vast, and is nice in variety.


In a person that dedicated their life to a supernatural entity's perspective, you can say it's quite a beautiful experience on the first few days or so. Maybe not for everyone, but these types of people feel like their special. It's their motivational drive, you can say. Although that type's mind is narrowed, and doesn't think in a formal way (generally), he/she will avoid any contradictions that comes into his/her way, in order to live in their own little paradise.


You can say that's blind, stupid, and ridiculous. But I find it of a beautiful thing, especially when groups form and they cheer and celebrate how powerful and beautiful their God is. I was once that type of man/female/plant, though I wasn't certainly the one to join in parties and celebrate that sort of stuff. I've looked more into the paranormal, supernatural, and spiritual sides of the internet. Most of them are interesting, claiming all of these sorts of things that no science can ever prove. Truly, how can we know anything?


To put it more into detail, if a 3 year old claims he can talk to spirits, we praise the boy for his imagination and hope to Darwin he doesn't do that same thing 20 years later. If a priest does it, it's just plain ridiculous we'd just ignore it. But how would we truly know about these spirits? How can we know that our imagination is actually just an inbox full of messages from billions of spiritual entities from the astral plane? I can't, I'll admit. That's a question that we cannot ever answer, unless we go into the fields of astral planes (if it exists) and firmly prove its existence. Then maybe we might create a hypnosis that our imagination isn't as it may seem to be.


Aside from that nonsense, I've had a thought about the whole Hell thing. Truly, we live in ignorance. We won't ever know if we live in a complex dream, we won't ever know if we're just scripts running in a computer, or a brain that's getting sensations from a server. Even if that's absurd, what's even more is that the Matrix is probably real!
Now, once I die in ignorance, not having a single clue what's coming to me; and I see the theistic God, what would I do? What would you think I do? Bash him because of the lack of clarity and information he gave me and let out into the world? What about our climate change, economic, and poverty problem? I can go on and on about the fear and misinformation he allowed into the world. He's at fault for all this; and if I had a sword made by 666 angels, a demon lord by my side, demonic techniques, and 4 elemental spirits inside me like that eroge visual novel I played, then I would attempt to defeat him and change his ways!! (or at least try)

As ridiculous as that sounds, what happens if I don't have all that special stuff? I would simply question him, and neither go to Heaven or Hell, but ask permission to have the freedom of exploring and wandering around the void of reality and beyond. But above all that, I don't think that a Hell exists, but made merely for the fear of obtaining believers and spreading their word. I no longer believe in the Bible, because it was completely prone to corruption, modification, and mistranslation. I don't really view it as an ancient text anymore, but I believe there's a bigger story than its proneness.


As reality's time goes, I believe I changed. Something good; certainly not in the Christian's paradise I once was (until I started questioning everything), but something that sparked an adventure of mysteries and the boundaries of reality itself. I view the Christian's life as a peaceful time to live in, something to hope for. Destroying that hope makes that person to rely on himself/herself, science, and most often history. That's most often a good thing, because that sparks the mind and leaves it open for many things to come. Everybody has something that they rely on, or at least center their world at. The things they center can change as frequently as that person does, it's more of a subconscious thing. That's something I view, whether it's right or wrong for you.


Out of all, and in conclusion, I've come and gone by the mass's ways. I'm still learning, but you may not think of me as an atheist, nor Christian. You can refer to me as agnostic, or weak atheism. And if the spiritual realm truly exists as they say (or at least an extremely interesting dreamland), then I wish to dive deeper into it, as much as possible (hoping to not get my rep ruined by evil rock golems in the way). But why did I dive into the spiritual field filled with blasphemy and lies with little truth? Because honestly, how would we know anything? In simpler form to explain it, what if we live in a dream? What if we have the ability to level up our consciousness into a more powerful level? Absurd and stupid as it sounds, that's the basis of it. Without judging it though, it does interesting. You can say I feel more at home in the Spirit Science or some other similar forum, which I do feel that way. But exploring other things don't hurt as much as believing in things, don't they?


I've learned so far, the basic conclusion of it, is that the only thing I truly know is that I exist and I know nothing.
Hopefully I made my point in this very, very long post... I'm not very well in keeping things clear, or things on topic, but I hope that this read gives you a good insight of what's going on in me so far. Also, I'm aware that I didn't cover absolutely everything here (entire stories never lurk in one source).


Have a nice day~

P.S: Move this thread anywhere you see fit, I didn't exactly cover only "testimonials" here.
« Last Edit: August 18, 2013, 01:56:09 AM by Avascar »

Offline William

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Re: The Things I've Learned
« Reply #1 on: August 18, 2013, 01:46:24 AM »
Certainly in this forum, many atheists come here and talk about their belief in how they don't believe in a God, and try and explain it in a way that's plainly ridiculous to the common man.

To be fair most of us who have been religious before are just having some fun with theistic ideas while expunging ourselves of the absurdity that wasted so much of our lives.  If you take your time on the forums here, you'll find an astonishingly deep and sincere search for truth and reason.  People who take offense at what we are saying will have a hard time wading past the satirical stuff and jokes.  But the gold is all there too - I've actually learned more about morality here than anywhere else I've looked.

Glad you've found your way back to a forum that also stimulated your mind  :)
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Offline Avascar

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Re: The Things I've Learned
« Reply #2 on: August 18, 2013, 01:57:51 AM »
Certainly in this forum, many atheists come here and talk about their belief in how they don't believe in a God, and try and explain it in a way that's plainly ridiculous to the common man.

To be fair most of us who have been religious before are just having some fun with theistic ideas while expunging ourselves of the absurdity that wasted so much of our lives.  If you take your time on the forums here, you'll find an astonishingly deep and sincere search for truth and reason.  People who take offense at what we are saying will have a hard time wading past the satirical stuff and jokes.  But the gold is all there too - I've actually learned more about morality here than anywhere else I've looked.

Glad you've found your way back to a forum that also stimulated your mind  :)

Heh, well I removed that paragraph. Felt that one didn't fit, if at all. (it wasn't much, so I hope that doesn't cause any problems)

Offline neopagan

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Re: The Things I've Learned
« Reply #3 on: August 18, 2013, 08:44:18 AM »
Welcome back Avascar.  I am new enough here I never saw you the first time, but I am glad you made your way back without the xian baggage. I lugged mine around for over thirty years and I am happy to say I never have felt better now that it is gone.

One thing that struck me about your post was how you referenced things we may not know or may never know about, especially in the spiritual planes. I would encourage you to explore the things we do know about - you can spend a lifetime learning about som  truly fascinating topics that we can discern much about - science, space, nature, even that computer youare sitting in front of now.  Sure, we may never "know" for certain if a god exists, spirits roam the earth, we are all part of a VR game run by klingons or if catching a leprechaun will make you a very wealthy former xian..., but things we know are great in and of themselves (there's closure, if you will).

Maybe I read too much into your post, but it sounded almost like an air of hopelessness creeping in, since there was so much that was unknowable. That's partly theistic talk... once removed from "it's god's will and his ways are not our ways, etc." and it is the xian way of essentially burying their head in the sand and ignoring the contradictions in front of them.

Anyway, welcome and yes, there is much to learn here - I learn something from the good folks here every day. Often, I learn things I never knew we knew, and sometimes answers to questions I never though to ask... golden!

If xian hell really exists, the stench of the burning billions of us should be a constant, putrid reminder to the handful of heavenward xians how loving your god is.  - neopagan

Offline ParkingPlaces

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Re: The Things I've Learned
« Reply #4 on: August 18, 2013, 09:36:49 AM »
I too welcome you back Avascar. And I am going to mirror what neopagan just said. If you set the goal of "knowing" and then set the standards beyond human capabilities, you are sort of doomed to be disappointed. By itself, the goal of "knowing" is, in an of itself, sort of beyond our capabilities. Especially when we have to make up what it is we are supposed to know. Anyone can paint a metaphysical picture of the universe and make it seem plausible. But we simply have no info as to whether or not we are a hologram, if there is something more than just this life, or any other easy to imagine alternative to simply being born human and dying that way. Our imaginations can run wild (witness religion) and our hopes are highly customizable (witness new age fanatics) but no answers are yet available, and I don't know how they could be, given the known limits of human awareness in this area. Which is zero.

Kind of wad that goal up like a piece of paper and toss it out. Accept that there are limits. And then delve in to what we can do. Explore the boundaries of human knowledge as we do our best to expand them. Those of us who are not scientists and not doing the exploring have the distinct advantage of being able to marvel, via the Internet and other sources, at the progress being made in dozens of fields. Daily. The universe and the planet we live on are incredible. I love being inundated by the newest findings in physics, astronomy, paleontology, biology, archaeology, chemistry, etc. What fun. Rather than being hunted in the stone age or being enslaved by the Jews or made to huddle in fear before a king, we get to live at a time when our knowledge base, and hence our awareness, is expanding exponentially. We even get to understand what exponential means. Way cool.

The easiest way to be disappointed is to set goals or standards that are unattainable. So forget that "knowing" stuff. That's for the religious, who are all wrong. (I should cut some slack for the Buddhists, who have no god and do a lot of introspection and may be on to something. I can't dismiss all of their insights as quickly as I can the christian attempts. So maybe if you still want to "know", you might start studying buddhism. I don't think you'll find any actual answers, but at least you won't be flinging mud all over reality as you seek answers.)

Life is chock full of the good, the bad and the ugly. And sadly, we aren't all Clint Eastwood. We don't even get to have scripts, like he had. But there is plenty to appreciate, plenty to learn and plenty to do. Take that path.
Not everyone is entitled to their own opinion. They're all entitled to mine though.

Offline Avascar

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Re: The Things I've Learned
« Reply #5 on: August 19, 2013, 07:02:34 PM »
Maybe I read too much into your post, but it sounded almost like an air of hopelessness creeping in, since there was so much that was unknowable. That's partly theistic talk... once removed from "it's god's will and his ways are not our ways, etc." and it is the xian way of essentially burying their head in the sand and ignoring the contradictions in front of them.

There's a difference from God's will and how the universe works. How theists think is from an entity's personality and what their god thinks what should form. To think how the universe works is from laws, and absolutes (primarily, I don't know everything).

But the difference is that, we know partly on how the universe works, apart from "God's will", which we don't and can't know anything about. A bit more physical and concrete than occult and astral things, if they are ever real.


@ ParkingPlaces: I suppose so, you do have a point. A big one, actually. Although our senses are flawed, I do hope there is some technological advances to aid and vastly increase our main 5 senses. I'll do surely keep your point in mind.

Offline Foxy Freedom

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Re: The Things I've Learned
« Reply #6 on: September 23, 2013, 11:30:12 AM »
Something you might be interested in. There is an experiment underway as we write to test whether the universe is similar to a computer simulation. The result should be decisive. Checkout the holographic universe online.

 Also it has been shown that the universe needs no energy for its creation. A god is unnecessary.
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