Author Topic: The Great Debaters  (Read 391 times)

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Offline shnozzola

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The Great Debaters
« on: July 13, 2013, 07:27:02 AM »


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Based on the true story of Melvin B. Tolson, a professor at Wiley College Texas. In 1935, he inspired African-American students to form the school's first debate team, which went on to defeat Harvard in the national championship.

What is interesting and sadly telling about this story is how long it has taken for the story to be told.  School students throughout the US should see this movie, and should have heard this story, should have far more exposure to these types of things, challenging them to consider how people were, and are treated.

Dialogue from Wiki:
 
James L. Farmer Jr:
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We do what we have to do in order to do what we want to do.

In Texas they lynch Negroes. My teammates and I saw a man strung up by his neck and set on fire. We drove through a lynch mob, pressed our faces against the floorboard. I looked at my teammates. I saw the fear in their eyes and, worse, the shame. What was this Negro's crime that he should be hung without trial in a dark forest filled with fog. Was he a thief? Was he a killer? Or just a Negro? Was he a sharecropper? A preacher? Were his children waiting up for him? And who are we to just lie there and do nothing. No matter what he did, the mob was the criminal. But the law did nothing. Just left us wondering, "Why?" My opponent says nothing that erodes the rule of law can be moral. But there is no rule of law in the Jim Crow south. Not when Negroes are denied housing. Turned away from schools, hospitals. And not when we are lynched. St Augustine said, "An unjust law is no law at all." Which means I have a right, even a duty to resist. With violence or civil disobedience. You should pray I choose the latter.

Samantha Booke:
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The state is currently spending five times more for the education for a white child than it is fitting to educate a colored child. That means better textbooks for that child than for that child. I say that's a shame, but my opponent says today is not the day for whites and coloreds to go to the same college. To share the same campus. To walk into the same classroom. Well, would you kindly tell me when that day is gonna come? Is it going to come tomorrow? Is it going to come next week? In a hundred years? Never? No, the time for justice, the time for freedom, and the time for equality is always, is always right now!

Henry Lowe:
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A brilliant young woman I know was asked once to support her argument in favor of social welfare. She named the most powerful source imaginable: the look in a mother's face when she cannot feed her children. Can you look that hungry child in the eyes? See the blood on his feet from working barefoot in the cotton fields. Or do you ask his baby sister with her belly swollen from hunger if she cares about her daddy's work ethics?

Melvin B. Tolson:
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Denigrate. There's a word for you. From the Latin word niger, to defame, to blacken. It's always there, isn't it? Even in the dictionary. Even in the speech of a Negro professor. Somehow, black is always equated with failure.
Anybody know who Willie Lynch was? Anybody? Raise your hand. No one? He was a vicious slave owner in the West Indies. The slave-masters in the colony of Virginia were having trouble controlling their slaves, so they sent for Mr. Lynch to teach them his methods. The word lynching came from his last name. His methods were very simple, but they were diabolical. Keep the slave physically strong but psychologically weak and dependent on the slave master. Keep the body, take the mind.

I am here to help you to find, take back, and keep your righteous mind.

“The best thing for being sad," replied Merlin, beginning to puff and blow, "is to learn something."  ~ T. H. White
  The real holy trinity:  onion, celery, and bell pepper ~  all Cajun Chefs

Offline LoriPinkAngel

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Re: The Great Debaters
« Reply #1 on: July 14, 2013, 02:20:53 AM »
How many young people can speak right, let alone debate anymore? My own niece (who is white) portrays herself like the poster child for Walmart. Kids need to wake up and act intelligent and dignified.  A friend of my posted the following on Facebook after the Zimmerman Verdict.  I agree with a lot of the sentiment.  Except the praying.  I'm off prayer & religion.  Due to my problems lately I've decided I prefer no god at all than one who ignores/tortures me.

"TODAY I WAS IN MY CAR AND I SAW 3 YOUNG MEN WALKING AND ALL OF THEM HAD THEIR PANTS DAMN NEAR TO THEIR KNEE CAPS. ONE PULLED DOWN WORSE THAN THE NEXT. I LOOKED AT THEM WITH DISGUST AND THEY GAVE ME THE "WTF U LOOKIN AT" LOOK BACK. WHEN WILL THEY UNDERSTAND THEY COULD BE THE NEXT TRAYVON MARTIN? I'M BLACK AND I LOOK AT THEM THAT WAY, HOW WILL ANYONE ELSE VIEW THEM? THESE ARE OUR SONS OUT THERE. EVERY PULLED DOWN PAIR OF PANTS REPRESENT PULLED DOWN DIGNITY. IT TAKES A VILLAGE, IN OUR CASE, IT TAKES A NATION. LET US KEEP OUR CHILDREN IN PRAYER. GOD BLESS!! ?#?PULLUPYOURDIGNITY?"

 
« Last Edit: July 14, 2013, 02:25:06 AM by LoriPinkAngel »
It doesn't make sense to let go of something you've had for so long.  But it also doesn't make sense to hold on when there's actually nothing there.