Author Topic: new synthetic enzyme  (Read 659 times)

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Offline wright

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new synthetic enzyme
« on: January 30, 2013, 05:19:19 PM »
Another increment towards abiogenesis:http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130130132411.htm

From the article:
Quote
Rational enzyme design relies on preconceived notions of what a new enzyme should look like and how it should function. In contrast, directed evolution involves producing a large quantity of candidate proteins and screening several generations to produce one with the desired function. With this approach, the outcome isn't limited by current knowledge of enzyme structure.

"Just as in nature, only the fittest survive after each successive generation," Seelig explains. The process continues until it produces an enzyme that efficiently catalyzes a desired biochemical reaction. In this case, the new enzyme joins two pieces of RNA together.

Fascinating. I'm really encouraged by research like this; it looks plausible that at least one potential path for abiogenesis will be recreated in my lifetime.
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Offline Nick

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Re: new synthetic enzyme
« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2013, 05:35:20 PM »
What are some of the possible applications of this down the road?
Yo, put that in your pipe and smoke it.  Quit ragging on my Lord.

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Offline Graybeard

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Re: new synthetic enzyme
« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2013, 06:13:10 PM »
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The process continues until it produces an enzyme that efficiently catalyzes a desired biochemical reaction.

Basically, if an organic substance occurs naturally as part of a life form or the process within a life-form, we would be able to create it without the original life-form - meat without animals, carbohydrates and sugars without plants, oil without dinosaurs, etc. We could turn waste into valuable and useful materials, CO2 into C and O2, develop drugs and molecules that presently are impossible or vastly expensive to produce now, etc.
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Offline wright

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Re: new synthetic enzyme
« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2013, 08:44:10 PM »
What are some of the possible applications of this down the road?

Excellent question. Discoveries like this advance biochemistry in general, showing us how to make drugs more effective and cheaply, even "tailoring" treatments for specific individuals:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personalized_medicine

Also, for procedures like enzyme replacement:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enzyme_replacement_therapy

I've said it before: I'd rather be alive now than at any other time in human history. The explosion of knowledge and general improvement of the human condition is astounding.

Live a good life... If there are no gods, then you will be gone, but will have lived a noble life that will live on in the memories of your loved ones. I am not afraid.
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Online Add Homonym

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Re: new synthetic enzyme
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2013, 08:46:48 AM »
What are some of the possible applications of this down the road?

I'm hoping for nanobots that turn us into "grey goo".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grey_goo
Humans, in general, don't waste any opportunity to be unfathomably stupid - Dr Cynical.