Author Topic: Chavis Carter  (Read 10370 times)

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Offline nogodsforme

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Re: Chavis Carter
« Reply #145 on: September 03, 2012, 01:01:16 PM »
I think we can l all agree that slavery was a widespread practice in the past and still exists in some forms. Every society has had slaves of some sort, whether POW's, criminals, people from different tribes or religions, scapegoated groups. Every society has benefited from slave labor, every society figured out ways to justify it, and no major religion banned it. It is only in the past century that slavery has gradually become a crime everywhere, and most people in the world today think it is a bad thing.

However, the global history of slavery is not the point of this discussion. We are talking about the disproportionate targeting of certain groups, particularly young brown skinned males, as criminals, even when they have not committed any crime.

Chattel, hereditary slavery based on race, Jim Crow laws and de facto segregation are US phenomena that affect attitudes and behavior in the US today. There is a relationship between these historical factors and who gets arrested and for what today in the US. There is a history behind what is considered "suspicious" behavior and who is considered to be "dangerous" in the US.

One of my favorite quotations is from Anatole France: The law, in its majestic equality, forbids the rich as well as the poor to sleep under bridges, to beg in the streets, and to steal bread.

The mistaken interpretation is that the law is fair, because it is illegal to do these things regardless of who you are. But, who is going to, of necessity, do these things? Race and class affect what laws are passed and how they are enforced. There are some crimes that are virtually impossible for a middle clas white man to commit-- loitering, for example. Loitering is being somewere that better off people don't want you to be, especially if you are unkempt and dirty. That is a crime almost solely based on class, and to a large extent, race. Why would anyone stand on a street corner,  sit on a park bench or on steps of the library all day if he had somehwere nicer to go?

I wish Joe would address these connections in some way instead of throwing out stuff about who sold who when and injustices in Africa today. Or start a different thread and we can discuss Africa. I've done reasearch on the African slave trade and lived and worked in several African countries, so I am sure Joe has a lot of insights he can share with me.
Extraordinary claims of the bible don't even have ordinary evidence.

Kids aren't paying attention most of the time in science classes so it seems silly to get worked up over ID being taught in schools.

Offline 12 Monkeys

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Re: Chavis Carter
« Reply #146 on: September 03, 2012, 02:06:03 PM »
Quote
And the "stories of the Jews being oppressed are hardly true accounts of history

Dauchau, Buchenwald, Auschwitz, Bergen-Belsen, Mauthausen, Treblinka... oh wait those are resorts, just stay away from the showers...  >:(
So I see you ignored the part about 90% of the population being wiped out.....and Haida and Irish,,,,Dad,Haida,mom Irish
« Last Edit: September 03, 2012, 02:08:41 PM by 12 Monkeys »
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Offline Quesi

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Re: Chavis Carter
« Reply #147 on: September 03, 2012, 02:09:41 PM »

One of my favorite quotations is from Anatole France: The law, in its majestic equality, forbids the rich as well as the poor to sleep under bridges, to beg in the streets, and to steal bread.



Sometimes that is the case.  And sometimes it is not.

In my neighborhood, a huge percentage of stop and frisks that I have witnessed, start with an open bottle of alcohol.  A group of day laborers, sitting on a stoop, passing around a bottle of Miller Light inside of a brown paper bag, will most likely have their bottle smashed on the sidewalk,[1] be thrown against a brick wall, searched, humiliated, intimidated, and then probably given a ticket, rather than being taken into custody.  Shockingly, I’ve seen the cops do the same thing to some guy sitting there drinking a malta,[2] because cops don’t seem to know what malta is, and they *think* the guy is drinking beer.

I’ve seen this scene so many times. 

But they are breaking the law.  I guess.

I live three blocks from the strip where day laborers sip beer after a long day of physical labor, and prostitutes of both genders, voluntary and involuntary, try to make a meager living.  I can walk safely down the strip because it is not a violent place.  For someone like me. 

My part of the neighborhood is enjoying gentrification.  It happened so slowly I didn’t recognize it initially.  First, the white gay men arrived,[3] buying up the gracious pre-war apartments and decorating them with art deco antiques.  Then the artists came.  Now the young families are arriving, and pushing McLaren strollers down the tree-lined narrow streets.

In front of my gracious pre-war building, on summer evenings, it is not uncommon to see a group of stylishly dressed gay men sitting on the stoop, sipping trendy cocktails out of long-stemmed glasses and stabbing nice hors d’oeurves with little multi-colored plastic swords.  The police pass by without stopping.

One late summer night a couple of years ago, I was sitting on the same stoop with another mom as our two pre-schoolers rode tricycles up and down the sidewalk.  She was holding her little baby in her arms, and we were each sipping a beer.  Two cops on horseback rode down the street, and the little kids jumped up and down excitedly.  I tried to discretely hide my beer behind a bag, but my friend walked right up to the cops on horseback, baby in own arm, beer in the other, and the friendly cops stopped and let the bigger kids touch the horses.  We made some pleasant chit chat with the cops as the kids squealed and giggled with delight, and then the cops waved goodbye and the kids blew kisses to the horses and then returned to their tricycles and the moms returned to our stoop to finish our beers.

In my neighborhood, there seem to be some problems in terms of administering this majestic equality equally.   
 1. not sure how smashing a glass bottle on the street improves the quality of life in the neighborhood
 2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malta_(soft_drink)
 3. gay latinos have been here for decades

Offline 12 Monkeys

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Re: Chavis Carter
« Reply #148 on: September 03, 2012, 02:13:01 PM »
Tell me in your opinion in the time of England and Spain being the grand powers that be,has there ever been a time when the white man was suppressed and exploited?

In the time of England and Spain being the grand powers? No. I know that Spain was conquered by Muslims in the early 8th century, though. England has had its share of invaders, but that's mostly white-on-white action. :laugh:


12 Monkeys, are you 100% Native American?
White guys killing each other,Indians,Africans...they all kill each other...my point is England and Spain went looking for trouble,leaving bodies in their wake wherever they went....Did you ever notice that they left the other aggressive nations alone when they went around pillaging?
« Last Edit: September 03, 2012, 02:32:10 PM by 12 Monkeys »
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Offline lotanddaughters

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Re: Chavis Carter
« Reply #149 on: September 03, 2012, 02:46:24 PM »
Did you ever notice that they left the other aggressive nations alone when they went around pillaging?

Of course.

What is your ancestry? Is your dad 100% Haida? Is your mom 100% Irish?
Enough with your bullshit.
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Offline 12 Monkeys

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Re: Chavis Carter
« Reply #150 on: September 03, 2012, 03:03:42 PM »
Did you ever notice that they left the other aggressive nations alone when they went around pillaging?

Of course.

What is your ancestry? Is your dad 100% Haida? Is your mom 100% Irish?
yes and yes....makes me one damn good looking guy....and how is this relevant?
There's no right there's no wrong,there's just popular opinion (Brad Pitt as Jeffery Goines in 12 monkeys)

Offline nogodsforme

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Re: Chavis Carter
« Reply #151 on: September 03, 2012, 03:04:10 PM »
One point I make when I teach about European colonialism is that people don't leave a place unless it sucks. Really bad. Because most people prefer to stay home. It has to be awful for people to take the risk of leaving the known for the unknown.

In Feudal Europe people were largely what we would call sharecroppers. There was no mobility, a few families owned everything and most were poor, landless and hungry. Options for the majority at the bottom were few. You could sell yourself into indenture. Or you could survive by doing things that got you into even more trouble. Being in debt, begging, prostitution etc were crimes punishable by imprisonment in workhouses, or being transported to a colony.

So 16th and 17th century Europe sucked for a lot of people, so those who could,  left. And those people were not the most civilized and privileged. When these explorers and mercenaries with not much to lose found other people and places, they raped and pillaged and burned and stole and enslaved. Leaving death and disease and destruction in their wake. The people who had it really good stayed home--and were later overthrown in a series of violent social revolutions.
 
Africa, Asia, the Pacific region and the Americas did not suck nearly as badly. These places were not paradises, but at least had enough resources to generally avoid hunger, and organized their societies so that extreme poverty, homelessness, begging and starvation were rare. One of the biggest threats to colonizing groups was that members would jump ship and "go native". In Hawaii, for example, they had to pass strict laws to prevent the white Christian sailors from disappearing forever into the heathen native populations.

If these places had been the impoverished, uncivilized hellholes Europeans later decided they were, there would have been no risk of "going native." In fact, they would never have been colonized. Because you don't colonize a place that has nothing to offer you.
Extraordinary claims of the bible don't even have ordinary evidence.

Kids aren't paying attention most of the time in science classes so it seems silly to get worked up over ID being taught in schools.

Offline 12 Monkeys

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Re: Chavis Carter
« Reply #152 on: September 03, 2012, 03:15:05 PM »
And the Europeans,came and did exactly the same thing that happened to them,became land Barons,exploited the land and its resources and its people for their benefit. How quickly they forgot where they were when they left. They used religion as a tool to justify their actions. North America would have been paradise for poor landless immigrants,it did not mean they had to act the way they did when they got here.

 In my neck of the woods there was peaceful interaction with the Caucasian and Spanish traders and the Aboriginals. Iron and cloth for for furs. When the fur supply began to dwindle is when the traders resorted to violence.
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Offline lotanddaughters

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Re: Chavis Carter
« Reply #153 on: September 03, 2012, 04:00:15 PM »
yes and yes....makes me one damn good looking guy....and how is this relevant?

I was wondering because there are people who are like 5% of something, and they totally affiliate themselves with that one ethnicity and forget the other(s) that they might actually be even more of. This is not you, however. I just wanted to confirm your legitimacy. :)
Enough with your bullshit.
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Offline nogodsforme

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Re: Chavis Carter
« Reply #154 on: September 04, 2012, 12:52:47 AM »
yes and yes....makes me one damn good looking guy....and how is this relevant?

I was wondering because there are people who are like 5% of something, and they totally affiliate themselves with that one ethnicity and forget the other(s) that they might actually be even more of. This is not you, however. I just wanted to confirm your legitimacy. :)


Why does it matter what ethnicity someone claims? Unless you do DNA testing, everyone's background is based on social construction, ie stories, culture, history, politics and lies. I am "black" in the US because of hypodescent, but "mestiza" in Latin America because they see my (one/eighth) native heritage, and "white" or "colored"or "metisse" in Africa because people there acknowledge my European ancestry. All of those terms have a different history and meaning behind them. Which should I be?[1]

Most African Americans have European (and Native) ancestry. Many have more European ancestry than African, because the one-drop rule of hypodescent meant that any known African ancestry put you into the "black" category, meaning more slaves for the masters. (Yay!) If a person was 5% African and 95% European, they were black as far as the white society was concerned.

Some people who were "black" based on the "one drop" were able to pass as white and disappear into white society, at great psychological cost. They had to cut themselves off from the black side of their heritage completely, and there are stories of people doing things like walking past their grandmothers without speaking if whites were around.

This is the source of the "tragic mulatto" genre-- "what about the poor mixed children who are not accepted by blacks or whites"? Of course, those children had always been in the black community. (At family reunions, my sister and I liked to play "guess the race" with various relatives.) It was the white community that didn't know what to do with this obvious evidence that black and white DNA mixed just fine no matter what kind of segregation laws were passed. Many black people in the US have white relatives, and know it. But hardly any white people know or acknowledge their black relatives. Amazing, ain't it?

After decades of political and social struggle, some people are able to acknowledge all their ancestry-- but the larger society still tries to pigeonhole people into one category. Choose one (so I know whether or not to be prejudiced against you!) And if you do chooose one, what right does anyone else have to tell you that the one you chose was wrong?

When I was younger and stupider, I used to get wigged out when I met people I would characterize as black who identified as Italian or native or whatever. Nowadays I try to be cool with whatever people want to identify as. Because your identity is not your DNA or what other people see when they look at you. It is what you see when you look in the mirror, and where you grew up, and who raised you, and what language you speak, and how other people treat you.[2]
 
 1. My oldest brother looked fully African with very black skin. Same parents as me with my "mixed" appearance.
 2. One of the saddest examples of this was a woman I knew in college. She was from Chile and was white with blonde hair and blue eyes. It was not until she spoke in her heavy Spanish accent that you knew she wasn't Scandinavian. She had a nervous breakdown in the US, because she experienced so much racist crap about Latinos from people who did not know she was one. It just got too exhausting for her to always be defending herself and losing respect for employers and freinds, and having them try to backtrack and apologize with, "Well we didn't mean you when we said you people were all lazy, dirty, illegal bean eaters." White people were always asking her why she identified as Latino instead of white. I remember her telling me in tears of frustration, after yet another encounter with racism, "I am not white! I am not European! I am a Chilean and that means Latino!" She became very anti-white and militantly Latino after she recovered from her breakdown. She had no patience for white people and associated exclusively with Latinos. I don't blame her.
Extraordinary claims of the bible don't even have ordinary evidence.

Kids aren't paying attention most of the time in science classes so it seems silly to get worked up over ID being taught in schools.

Offline lotanddaughters

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Re: Chavis Carter
« Reply #155 on: September 04, 2012, 06:51:49 AM »
Why does it matter what ethnicity someone claims?

The truth of ethnicity matters to someone who wants to know the truth. The claim of ethnicity is sufficient to someone who only wants to know what the other is claiming.

Unless you do DNA testing, everyone's background is based on social construction, ie stories, culture, history, politics and lies.

I agree that without DNA testing, you can't tie it down 100%.

I am "black" in the US because of hypodescent, but "mestiza" in Latin America because they see my (one/eighth) native heritage, and "white" or "colored"or "metisse" in Africa because people there acknowledge my European ancestry. All of those terms have a different history and meaning behind them. Which should I be?[1]
 1. My oldest brother looked fully African with very black skin. Same parents as me with my "mixed" appearance.

Yeah, I've heard personal testimonies of people of mixed race. Sometimes they are never totally embraced by the "pure-bread" or seemingly pure-bread people around them. In some circles, you're not "black" enough. In other circles, you're not "white" enough. Or whatever. It's unfortunate. In the U.S., the population of mixed race people will keep increasing so that someday it will be the majority. This will take a few or more likely many generations before mixed race is the majority. But, with each generation, the acceptance of people of mixed race will always be ahead of the population of mixed race, so that is hopeful.

Enough with your bullshit.
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Offline 12 Monkeys

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Re: Chavis Carter
« Reply #156 on: September 04, 2012, 10:07:46 AM »
pretty soon we will all be grey
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Offline nogodsforme

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Re: Chavis Carter
« Reply #157 on: September 04, 2012, 01:54:27 PM »
pretty soon we will all be grey

Ashes to ashes, dust to dust.... ;)
Extraordinary claims of the bible don't even have ordinary evidence.

Kids aren't paying attention most of the time in science classes so it seems silly to get worked up over ID being taught in schools.

Offline nogodsforme

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Re: Chavis Carter
« Reply #158 on: September 04, 2012, 02:11:24 PM »
Why does it matter what ethnicity someone claims?

The truth of ethnicity matters to someone who wants to know the truth. The claim of ethnicity is sufficient to someone who only wants to know what the other is claiming.
What is this ethnic truth of which you speak? And why does it really matter to a stranger what ethnicity you claim? I think it is because people are prejudiced and what to know who they are dealing with, so they know how to behave around you. (Can I make that Polish joke? Make that stupid remark about Asians? Show my disrespect for Mexicans?) Like the white people who wanted my Chilean friend to be white instead of Latino so they could freely be racist against Latinos around her.

People who don't clearly fit one category upset the racial apple cart. Racial and ethnic categories are made up within historical contexts, which is why my race changes depending what country I am in. In reality, everyone is mixed and there is no such thing as a pure race.
 
People make up their ethnicity all the time, almost always trying to move into a group that would be better treated. Irish and Scottish became English on the boat over. Jewish became Russian when the pogroms started up.  German became "American" after WWI.  Nobody white-looking was native in 1870, because natives got treated like crap, and then everyone white suddenly discovered a Cherokee grandmother in the 1970's.

Unless you do DNA testing, everyone's background is based on social construction, ie stories, culture, history, politics and lies.

I agree that without DNA testing, you can't tie it down 100%.


And even DNA won't tell you anything important about understanding that person.....
Extraordinary claims of the bible don't even have ordinary evidence.

Kids aren't paying attention most of the time in science classes so it seems silly to get worked up over ID being taught in schools.

Offline Timo

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Re: Chavis Carter
« Reply #159 on: September 07, 2012, 02:12:27 AM »
I know I'm late.  But fuck it though.  My two cents.

I am a young (ish) black and Latino male.  I've been detained and subjected to searches more times than I can remember.  Some of them for good reason.  Some of them...not so much.  And not so much recently.  That's one of the nice things about getting older, I guess.  I've been arrested.  I was a juvenile offender.  I've been in a cell.  I was the sort of kid to whom our man joe would have gladly handed a bullet in a moment of depression.  But I was also the kind of kid that was very respectful towards law enforcement.  Everything was yes sir, no sir.  It had to be.  I think that might have kept me safe in a lot of otherwise bad situations.  I was deferential too.  We can talk all we want about what the law says or about crime data, but when you find yourself detained by a police, especially if it's late or there just aren't many people out, you very quickly realize that it's just you and him and whatever happens it's your word against his.  And so you put your hands over your head, you let him kick open your legs.  You sit on the curb, arms and legs stretched out and crossed.  You cooperate.  Yes sir.  No sir.

I didn't think that this was a particularly strange way to think about things until I went to college and spent more time around white people that were not the sort of white people that were comfortable in the sorts of places where I spent most of my time.  I had caught glimpses of this before though, DJing parties where drunk white kids would argue with police outside of suburban homes, red cup in hand, yelling "what's your badge number?!"  I found their behavior almost unfathomable.  And insufferable.  I often enjoyed watching the more obnoxious kids get ticketed for open containers.  Whether or not some police abuse their authority, the fact of the matter is that they do a difficult and vital job and they deserve to be treated with respect.  And it boggled my mind to learn that in some places, people grew up not understanding that the failure to show that respect might lead to physical violence.  This kind of behavior is forever contrasted in my mind with a scene outside of another party, one that my parents threw when I was a kid.  I remember my father and a very understanding police officer negotiating a solution to the parking problem that our little get together had caused on our block.  "Alright then, you folks have a fine evening."  Handshake.  No tickets.  No intimidation.  Just respect.  To me, that's the model.  That's how it's supposed to be.  On both sides.  And anything less than that kind of respect can result in some very bad outcomes.  And I've seen that unfold too.

So look, when I read a story like that of Mr. Carter my perspective is this.  I don't know what happened.  But I do know that police sometimes abuse people in their custody.  They sometimes even rape and kill people in their custody.  There are police that have gone to prison behind these offenses.  And there are police that are still walking around like that's okay.  But I've never heard of someone shooting themselves, whilst hand cuffed in the back of a squad car.  And having been subject to more than my fair share of searches, I find it hard to believe that the police could have missed a handgun after subjecting him to two pat downs.  I find it easier to believe that they shot him, even if I can't think of a reason why they might do this intentionally.  Call me biased. 

But I obviously realize that I am not in a position to say that with any degree of certainty.  I'm running off a hunch.  But I think that this warrents further investigation, preferrably by an outside agency.  The video posted demonstrates that it's entirely possible that the young man shot himself, even in that compromised position. 

The bottom line for me is this.  We give the state a monopoly on force.  Those who work on behalf of that state then, those trusted with the power to exercise that force, should be subject to as much scruitany as possible.  I think we can all agree on that.

Anyway, happy Friday!
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Offline nogodsforme

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Re: Chavis Carter
« Reply #160 on: September 07, 2012, 11:04:09 AM »
I have been waiting for your perspective, Timo. And it was worth the wait.
Extraordinary claims of the bible don't even have ordinary evidence.

Kids aren't paying attention most of the time in science classes so it seems silly to get worked up over ID being taught in schools.

Offline Timo

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Re: Chavis Carter
« Reply #161 on: September 07, 2012, 05:16:12 PM »
Why thank you.
Nah son...

Offline Quesi

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Re: Chavis Carter
« Reply #162 on: September 07, 2012, 06:33:10 PM »

The bottom line for me is this.  We give the state a monopoly on force.  Those who work on behalf of that state then, those trusted with the power to exercise that force, should be subject to as much scruitany as possible.  I think we can all agree on that.

Anyway, happy Friday!

Yes. 

A few days ago I presented some personal anecdotes based on my observations of the different ways that people are treated in my neighborhood when the police see them with open alcohol.  I really think that open alcohol is an interesting “crime” to examine, because it is an activity that crosses the lines of race and class.  But the way the police respond to it varies, according to race and perceived class. 

If I had prayed, I could not have hoped that two days after sharing those anecdotes, a study of police ticketing practices in NYC would be published, along with an interactive map.  The ticketing practices, which usually follow a stop and search, are disproportionately centered in communities of color. 

My neighborhood had lots of open alcohol tickets, but we won the distinction of the most public urination tickets in the city.  We also scored high on things such as not following the instructions on park signs (such as no eating or smoking) and bicycles on sidewalks.  But we didn’t score nearly as high as Harlem and the South Bronx and Flatbush on the big ticket items such as disorderly conduct and trespass. 

Excellent article.  The interactive map is down towards the bottom of the page, and it is a lot of fun to click on.

http://www.thenewyorkworld.com/2012/09/05/nypd-improbable-cause/

Anyone familiar with NYC geography will be delighted to see that the residents who live on Central Park West, and Park Avenue (south of 100th Street) and the Financial District are much better behaved than those of us who live in more diverse communities. 

Offline Quesi

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Re: Chavis Carter
« Reply #163 on: October 04, 2012, 07:31:02 PM »
This happened about a mile from my home. 

Unarmed national guardsman shot and killed by police during a traffic stop.  He was 22. 

It was 5 am.  There were two female passengers in the car.  One passenger said he did not stop immediately when he heard the sirens.  He said "i'm not doing anything wrong."  The same passenger said that when he pulled over, he had his hands on the steering wheel as the police approached.  The police said he was reaching under the seat.

But you know what the sad thing is? Do you know why this is even being investigated?  Well, the other passenger, who had been asleep, and who was awakened by the gunshot, she's a cop. 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/10/04/noel-polanco-national-guardsman_n_1940259.html?icid=maing-grid7%7Cmain5%7Cdl1%7Csec1_lnk2%26pLid%3D215798#slide=1603130

http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/queens/one_person_shot_near_laguardia_airport_yUBwDtm1QVPEqmnpmPo5TM

Offline Mr. Blackwell

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Re: Chavis Carter
« Reply #164 on: October 04, 2012, 11:18:32 PM »
He should have pulled over but....I guess cutting off "elite" NYPD officers warrents getting shot.

I find this testimony from the NY Post article particularly damning.

Quote
And then they had us with our hands on the vehicle telling us your friend shot himself.

Let this be a lesson to us all. We MUST fully SUBMIT to our local and federal governments at ALL times or risk being shot for noncompliance.
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Offline screwtape

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Re: Chavis Carter
« Reply #165 on: October 05, 2012, 08:32:12 AM »
I heard it reported on the radio this morning.  It was described as an act of road rage by the cop.  The Post article was very incomplete.
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Offline Quesi

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Re: Chavis Carter
« Reply #166 on: October 05, 2012, 10:47:16 AM »
I heard it reported on the radio this morning.  It was described as an act of road rage by the cop.  The Post article was very incomplete.

Interesting.  This is getting more press than I thought it would.

Interestingly, the police told the front seat passenger "Your friend shot himself."

There seems to be a lot of that going around lately. 

Offline screwtape

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Re: Chavis Carter
« Reply #167 on: October 05, 2012, 11:41:30 AM »
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“The police proceeded to try to chase us, sticking their middle finger at us and screaming obscenities at the car and trying to pull us over and trying to veer us into divider on left lane of Grand Central Parkway,” she said.
...
“Their cars were at no time marked and labeled police,” she said. ”I honestly thought it was an armored car and security for an armored car.”
...
DeFerrari said Polanco kept his hands on the steering wheel and never reached for anything or made a suspicious move.

Instead, she insists this is a case of road rage taken to extremes by police.

http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2012/10/05/vigil-held-for-man-killed-in-police-involved-shooting-on-grand-central-parkway/

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Offline Mr. Blackwell

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Re: Chavis Carter
« Reply #168 on: October 05, 2012, 05:47:42 PM »
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Dorothy Garcia said Det. Hassan Hamdy was one of the officers who barged into her house five years ago and brutalized her grandson, Tyrell.

http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/det-hamdy-named-earlier-brutality-lawsuit-article-1.1176119

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Online Nam

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Re: Chavis Carter
« Reply #169 on: October 11, 2012, 04:23:40 PM »
I have a friend who's a former Miami Police Officer. She pulled over a guy for doing 110 in a 70 MPH zone, and when he rolled down the window, he shot her 5 times in the chest. She was wearing a vest, luckily, that saved her life. She retired after that, married a Marine Officer, and moved to Hawaii.

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This thread is about lab-grown dicks, not some mincy, old, British poof of an actor. 

Let's get back on topic, please.


Offline nogodsforme

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Re: Chavis Carter
« Reply #170 on: October 12, 2012, 05:54:01 PM »
I have a friend who's a former Miami Police Officer. She pulled over a guy for doing 110 in a 70 MPH zone, and when he rolled down the window, he shot her 5 times in the chest. She was wearing a vest, luckily, that saved her life. She retired after that, married a Marine Officer, and moved to Hawaii.

-Nam

I get nervous for their safety when I see lone patrol officers riding around. They should always have backup. Then, when an a$$hole tries something like that, the partner can jump in. I am afraid that with cutbacks, there are more lone officers out there. I don't blame her for retiring. they say that pullover stops are the most dangerous, which is why the police are so jumpy if you make a false move.
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Re: Chavis Carter
« Reply #171 on: October 16, 2012, 10:08:38 PM »
^you're assuming she didn't have back up. I didn't state she did or didn't. I don't know. I will have to ask her next time I speak to her.

-Nam
This thread is about lab-grown dicks, not some mincy, old, British poof of an actor. 

Let's get back on topic, please.