Author Topic: Is this okay?  (Read 1095 times)

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Offline inveni0

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Is this okay?
« on: June 24, 2012, 10:44:50 AM »
As a non-believer in any god that has been presented to me, I have been thinking recently about my children, and how to help them, as children, deal with death and loss.  An idea that stuck me the other day was to paint science in a religious context.  In other words, like this:

When we die, our bodies are turned back into light and energy.  We're reabsorbed into the earth, and we shine back into space.  All of our being is recycled into the universe.  There may come a day when pieces of ourselves are used by the universe to form new civilizations, new people, kings and queens, peasants and beggars.  Likewise, we might just be made up of pieces of a long lost civilization from the center of the galaxy.  And so, when we feel the wind in our hair and the sunlight against our face, we can be reminded that the people we have lost are all around us, keeping Earth strong and healthy.  And in that sense, they have never left us, and while they may not know it, they'll look after us until the end of time.

It's not inherently false.  It's also not assumptive, but I thought it was a nice and comforting idea, and I wanted to get some thoughts on it, just in case something comes up and I choose to fall back on it.  I don't like telling my kids, "When you die, you're gone."  But I don't want to lie to them, either.

Thoughts?
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Offline ParkingPlaces

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Re: Is this okay?
« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2012, 10:58:03 AM »
First of all, I want to say that kids handle death about a billion times better than adults give them credit for. It is the adults who are afraid, not the children.

Second, I am all for telling them about how our basic elements are recycled. It makes for an amazing science lesson along with the possibly comforting aspects. Every breathe we take contains air that was in the lungs of Einstein and Aristotle. The water in our bodies includes H2O that was in Newton and William the Conqueror and even our own parents. Our carbon atoms have been in stars, as was our iron. And all of it is destined to go elsewhere whether we are here or not.

As I pointed out in a post not too long ago, the glass of water you just drank included molecules of water that were in the perspiration created by your parents when you were conceived. along with molecules sweated by most everyone else's parents.

Get used to it. And inform your kids. You don't need to tell them that last part though. Death they can handle. But not that.
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Online One Above All

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Re: Is this okay?
« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2012, 01:13:12 PM »
While I appreciate the thought, ParkingPlaces is right. Adults fear death. Children do not. While death is not something that should be feared, it also shouldn't be seen in such a manner. Death is the end for everyone and everything.

Dead people don't "look after" other people "until the end of time". That is a lie, plain and simple. When people die, they're dead. They no longer exist. Period. A person is not their whole body. A person is a consciousness, and that consciousness ceases to be when they die. That's what death is. You shouldn't sugarcoat it, because it will just result in more lies, but you shouldn't be cruel either.


Explain why death isn't something that should be feared (and perhaps learn that yourself), but it's also not something that should be seen in a positive manner. Don't try to "mystify" it.
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Offline Quesi

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Re: Is this okay?
« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2012, 01:15:49 PM »
I think it is beautiful. 

I get all teary eyed every time I hear Neil DeGrasse Tyson do his "we are stardust" speech. 

Although I was raised in a secular home, I flirted with earth-based paganism for many years because I love the "we all go back to the earth in the great cycle of life" concept.  But to put us, literally and metaphorically back into the universe is even more profound. 

I do talk to my daughter about the cycle of life.  Everyone is born.  Everyone grows.  Everyone dies.  I also like to remind her that when we talk about the people we loved who are gone, we keep their memories alive.  My sweet daughter walks past forsythia, and says "your mom loved forsythia."  And it makes me feel so good inside.  She knows that my father loved animation, and that a long time ago, artists drew individual cells to make cartoons, and that my father used to make stick figure cartoons for me, and talk about how hard the artists worked to make the big, full length animated films.  For her, at 5 years old, my mom lives in spring flowers, and my dad lives in the cartoons she loves.  Later, I hope that when as she learns about ethics, she thinks of my dad.  And when she learns about strong women who broke the rules of class and gender and "proper conduct," she thinks of my mom. 

PP - Good to see you!  Thought you were hidden away far from the internet for a while. 

Offline inveni0

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Re: Is this okay?
« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2012, 01:34:49 PM »
While I appreciate the thought, ParkingPlaces is right. Adults fear death. Children do not. While death is not something that should be feared, it also shouldn't be seen in such a manner. Death is the end for everyone and everything.

Dead people don't "look after" other people "until the end of time". That is a lie, plain and simple. When people die, they're dead. They no longer exist. Period. A person is not their whole body. A person is a consciousness, and that consciousness ceases to be when they die. That's what death is. You shouldn't sugarcoat it, because it will just result in more lies, but you shouldn't be cruel either.


Explain why death isn't something that should be feared (and perhaps learn that yourself), but it's also not something that should be seen in a positive manner. Don't try to "mystify" it.

I think you're revoking my poetic license unfairly.  "Looking after us until the end of time" is a metaphor.  The circle of matter and energy from element to element is what sustains the universe.  Eventually, time WILL end (when this circle is interrupted by expansion or some other event). 

Secondly, I don't believe that this teaches children to fear death.  But I do believe that you are wrong if you think children can not experience great pain and suffering after loosing a loved one.  As a child, I lost a number of loved ones, and the pain and suffering I felt was incomparable to fear.  So to assume that this story is to dissuade fear is a poor assumption.  This is to assure a child that death is a part of life, just as life is a part of the universe.  And that the universe is eternal for as long as time allows.

That's only mystifying if you lack any comprehension of physics.
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Offline Quesi

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Re: Is this okay?
« Reply #5 on: June 24, 2012, 01:42:25 PM »
OAA is a literalistic.  And an aficionado of physics. 

And OAA, correct me if I am wrong, someone who was raised with myths that he resents.  He doesn't believe in lying to children.  And neither do I.

But there is so much beauty and truth in the complexities of the universe, that I think it is wonderful to draw on those realities to help kids (and grown ups) understand the context of our brief moments of life and consciousness.

Neil DeGrasse Tyson can be found all over youtube saying this a dozen different ways, but I think this is my favorite. 


Offline inveni0

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Re: Is this okay?
« Reply #6 on: June 24, 2012, 01:51:36 PM »
OAA is a literalistic.  And an aficionado of physics. 

And OAA, correct me if I am wrong, someone who was raised with myths that he resents.  He doesn't believe in lying to children.  And neither do I.

But there is so much beauty and truth in the complexities of the universe, that I think it is wonderful to draw on those realities to help kids (and grown ups) understand the context of our brief moments of life and consciousness.

Neil DeGrasse Tyson can be found all over youtube saying this a dozen different ways, but I think this is my favorite. 

[snip]

I was also raised with myths I resent.  And you'll find me supporting them with a fiery passion throughout these boards (before my transformation).  And now I'm a realist, but I'll be damned if realism prevents me from realizing the beauty of the universe and sharing that beauty in a language that is easy for children and adults to digest in a time of hardship.

Yes, Neil DeGrasse Tyson has a wonderful ability to put the wonders of the universe into words, and in your clip, he does a great job of elegantly wording what I was trying to say.
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Online One Above All

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Re: Is this okay?
« Reply #7 on: June 24, 2012, 01:52:51 PM »
I think you're revoking my poetic license unfairly.

I don't.

That's only mystifying if you lack any comprehension of physics.

Unless your kids are born with the knowledge of physics you're basing your "poetry" on, I think my post was entirely justified.

And OAA, correct me if I am wrong, someone who was raised with myths that he resents.

I don't resent the myths. Given our nature, they were inevitable. I resent those who raised me with myths.

He doesn't believe in lying to children.

I don't believe in lying; period. Just clarifying.


EDIT: Another clarification: I don't have a problem with iveni0's idea because I'm a "literalistic" (sic). I have a problem with it because, from my perspective, he's trying to give his kids the wrong idea about death; that it's "magical". The metaphors will be interpreted literally unless the kids know nuclear physics to the degree of someone in the 12th grade.
« Last Edit: June 24, 2012, 02:07:34 PM by One Above All »
The truth is absolute. Life forms are specks of specks (...) of specks of dust in the universe.
Why settle for normal, when you can be so much more? Why settle for something, when you can have everything?
We choose our own gods.

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Offline jetson

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Re: Is this okay?
« Reply #8 on: June 24, 2012, 03:29:54 PM »
Your idea works for me.  Although, I think this stuff depends on the age of the child.  At a certain age, I think it is important to let children know that death is the end of who we are consciously.  I really think it's time to shed the woo, and acknowledge the beauty of reality, as harsh as it cans seem at times.

Parents are the perfect people to help children understand how permanent death really is.  And even though we become scattered, we are more likely to become worm food than we are to transform into something so "poetic".


Offline inveni0

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Re: Is this okay?
« Reply #9 on: June 24, 2012, 03:53:49 PM »
The metaphors will be interpreted literally unless the kids know nuclear physics to the degree of someone in the 12th grade.

Would you agree that a cigarette lighter might appear "magical" to someone who has never seen one before?  I think I can't be as concerned about the level of my child's education during a time of loss as I am about their deepest sorrows.  But I won't argue with you about it.  You can believe what you must.  Just know that I don't present anything to my children as magical.  But I do believe that the line between magical and fascinating only disappears when you lose your sense of wonder.  For example, my son finds the idea that we're made of stardust as "fascinating", because it causes him to wonder more about it.  This is good because it brings him a deeper level of knowledge that he seeks out on his own.  My parents, on the other hand, find a recovery from cancer as "magical", because they do not wonder more about it.  They "know" that "God" did it, and even the chemo and radiation treatments can't convince them otherwise because they don't wonder.

So while I agree with you that teaching kids to believe in magic is wrong, I do not believe that presenting something fascinating to a child in a manner that brings them awe and wonder is equivocal.
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Online One Above All

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Re: Is this okay?
« Reply #10 on: June 24, 2012, 03:56:56 PM »
Death is not wondrous. It's an inevitable step of life. Specifically the last one we take. We don't "look after" anyone; our bodies don't help anyone. We just end. That's all. To make them think death is something to be awed by is, IMO, teaching them magical thinking.
The truth is absolute. Life forms are specks of specks (...) of specks of dust in the universe.
Why settle for normal, when you can be so much more? Why settle for something, when you can have everything?
We choose our own gods.

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Offline inveni0

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Re: Is this okay?
« Reply #11 on: June 24, 2012, 03:59:52 PM »
Death is not wondrous. It's an inevitable step of life. Specifically the last one we take. We don't "look after" anyone; our bodies don't help anyone. We just end. That's all. To make them think death is something to be awed by is, IMO, teaching them magical thinking.

Ahhhhh, I see what you're saying.  You're simply missing that my goal is to teach them to think beyond death.  I DO teach my kids that death is final.  The last word for life.  But I'd also like them to see the universe as a whole.

Jeez...haven't you ever seen The Lion King?
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Online One Above All

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Re: Is this okay?
« Reply #12 on: June 24, 2012, 04:02:12 PM »
But I'd also like them to see the universe as a whole.

Read my sig. Life (and therefore death) is irrelevant to the universe as a whole.

Jeez...haven't you ever seen The Lion King?

I have. What does that have to do with anything?
The truth is absolute. Life forms are specks of specks (...) of specks of dust in the universe.
Why settle for normal, when you can be so much more? Why settle for something, when you can have everything?
We choose our own gods.

A.K.A.: Blaziken/Lucifer/All In One/Orion.

Offline inveni0

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Re: Is this okay?
« Reply #13 on: June 24, 2012, 04:10:05 PM »
But I'd also like them to see the universe as a whole.

Read my sig. Life (and therefore death) is irrelevant to the universe as a whole.

Just because the universe doesn't care if we live or die doesn't mean we're irrelevant to the universe as a whole.  I think we're very relevant.  While stars and black holes are evidence of the universe's ability to be powerful and commanding, life is evidence of the universe's ability to connect.  Without us, the universe wouldn't be beautiful.  And while that beauty might only exist within our own minds, it DOES, in fact, exist.  And it exists because of the universe.

I understand the idea that nothing matters because it all dies anyway (galaxies, solar systems, planets, etc).  And that's why being able to comprehend the wonders of the universe is such a cool thing.  There IS room for philosophy in a universe without a god.  There IS room to love and cry in a universe without a god.  And it's all here because that's just how the universe works.  The universe is wonderful, and when we lose the ability to share that wonder (or when we deny ourselves the pleasure of sharing), it saddens me...even if the universe doesn't care if I'm sad.

Jeez...haven't you ever seen The Lion King?

I have. What does that have to do with anything?

Nothing, I suppose.
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Online One Above All

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Re: Is this okay?
« Reply #14 on: June 24, 2012, 04:13:27 PM »
<snip>

Sorry, inveni0; all I see in your post is magic. We are nothing compared to the universe. Less than nothing.[1] Death does not make life irrelevant, but the fact that life forms are tiny and can never influence the universe makes them irrelevant. The universe without us would still be as epic as it is now. Our existence is irrelevant.
 1. See, I can use metaphors too.
The truth is absolute. Life forms are specks of specks (...) of specks of dust in the universe.
Why settle for normal, when you can be so much more? Why settle for something, when you can have everything?
We choose our own gods.

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Offline inveni0

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Re: Is this okay?
« Reply #15 on: June 24, 2012, 04:17:30 PM »
<snip>

Sorry, inveni0; all I see in your post is magic. We are nothing compared to the universe. Less than nothing.[1] Death does not make life irrelevant, but the fact that life forms are tiny and can never influence the universe makes them irrelevant. The universe without us would still be as epic as it is now. Our existence is irrelevant.
 1. See, I can use metaphors too.

No.  Without us, the word "epic" wouldn't even exist.

But I understand your point and appreciate your input (I did ask for it afterall  ;D).
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Online One Above All

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Re: Is this okay?
« Reply #16 on: June 24, 2012, 04:19:10 PM »
No.  Without us, the word "epic" wouldn't even exist.

The word is only relevant for us to communicate the meaning. The meaning would still exist because the universe is the single greatest thing we have ever laid our eyes on, and it would still be great even if we weren't here to observe it.
The truth is absolute. Life forms are specks of specks (...) of specks of dust in the universe.
Why settle for normal, when you can be so much more? Why settle for something, when you can have everything?
We choose our own gods.

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Offline Quesi

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Re: Is this okay?
« Reply #17 on: June 24, 2012, 04:41:05 PM »
I agree OAA, that the universe is amazing beyond our understanding.  And as Dr. Degrass Tyson points out, we are connected to this amazing universe in ways that we can only begin to comprehend.

Jetson, i think that wormfood is poetic too.  Although most of us will be embalmed or cremated, I find the idea of returning to the earth, and making the soil fertile, so that plants grow and animals feast on them, and the plants exhale oxygen into the air that animals and people breath and we all become part of the cycle of life, to be very poetic. 

Our consciousness will be gone.  But tiny bits of our being will exist, in many different, even inconceivable forms, throughout all of time.  Just as the atoms that compose our bodies existed at the beginning of the universe.  I find that comforting. 

Offline inveni0

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Re: Is this okay?
« Reply #18 on: June 24, 2012, 05:37:49 PM »
Our consciousness will be gone.  But tiny bits of our being will exist, in many different, even inconceivable forms, throughout all of time.  Just as the atoms that compose our bodies existed at the beginning of the universe.  I find that comforting.

Exactly.
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Offline Gnu Ordure

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Re: Is this okay?
« Reply #19 on: June 24, 2012, 07:29:08 PM »
hi inveni0,

I'm reminded of a conversation I had with my little boy when he was five or six. I took a more metaphorical approach, on the spur of the moment.

We happened to be sitting on the beach on a windy day with big waves coming in. He'd been thinking about death, because the cat had got run over, and he suddenly wanted to know where we come from, and where we go when we die. And he seemed anxious about the whole thing.

Me: Hey, you see the big waves coming in?
A: Yeah...
Me: And you see all the spray coming off the top of the waves? Millions of drops of water flying through the air?
A: Uh-huh.
Me: OK. So let's pretend that each of those drops of water is a person, like you or me, or a pussy-cat like Ginger. We all get thrown out of the ocean when we're born, and we all fly through the air as little drops of water, living our lives.

And when we've finished living, we fall back into the sea which we came from, and where we belong.

And then another wave comes along, and it's someone else's turn to fly through the air.

That's how it works.

But also, notice that some droplets of water stay in the air longer than others? Some fly high, carried by the wind, others barely make it out of the sea. Some people and animals live for a long time, others for a short time; that's just the way it is. But the waves go on forever.


He seemed to like this; we sat and watched the waves roll in, the spray being created over and over again, and he seemed reassured by the unrelenting power of the ocean. Waves keep coming; life goes on.


Offline joebbowers

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Re: Is this okay?
« Reply #20 on: June 25, 2012, 05:29:41 AM »
As a non-believer in any god that has been presented to me, I have been thinking recently about my children, and how to help them, as children, deal with death and loss.  An idea that stuck me the other day was to paint science in a religious context.  In other words, like this:

<snip>

I like it, but definitely leave out the "looking after us" kind of stuff. It needs to be clear that there is no afterlife. It might help to add that there is no reason to fear death, as it is just returning to the state of non-existence we were in for at least 14 billions years before our birth. We didn't mind not existing back then, why should we mind now?
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Offline IAmFirst

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Re: Is this okay?
« Reply #21 on: June 26, 2012, 06:25:56 AM »
Try some focus on love, respect and memory.

As long as people remember someone, think abut them, share experiences with others, they can't die entirely.

Death only matters to the living. ;)
2nd of all, if all you believe in is peer-reviewed papers, you won't go very far in life...

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Offline periboob

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Re: Is this okay?
« Reply #22 on: June 30, 2012, 12:00:55 PM »
Good morning gentlemen. I have not been by much lately, just an occasional visit to see if there is an  interesting argument. Guess I missed most of this one, but I frequently show up late where ever I go.  And it is hot outside, not much on TV, so this must be my day to be philosophic. I may have posted my  specs before, but just in case: I am an "abeliefist". (I dont like the over-used ambiguous terms like  "atheist" because they incite wasted circular discussion, so I just make up my own terms.)

I do not "believe" in Allah, Jesus, Mohammed, Buddha, or individual humans that I only know of through  the internet.  I also dont "believe" in Creationism, Evolution, Relativity, or Gravity... I just have  made judgements about the likelihood of each of these entities... judgements that I am fully prepared  to re-assess when new evidence is presented. Gravity is looking pretty good, but I have not yet ruled  out "The Earth Sucks".

Considering how much we dont know about the physical universe, it is not surprising that we dont have a  good grasp on such poorly defined terms as life and death. But it is surprising to see anyone here expressing  certainty either way. The feeling that there is no possible chance for any continued existence after  the brain ceases to function, is uncomfortably close to the idea that Heaven with its streets of gold,  and Hell with the lake of fire, are unquestionable real places.

The evidence for a universe well beyond our understanding is pretty convincing to folks lots smarter about that sort of thing than I. The Anthropic nature of our universe suggests either intelligent  design, or many universes with different fundamental laws of science. Both ideas are pretty rattling.

When I look out at our local cluster of galaxies, it seems pretty unlikely that human life was very  important to any "creator". (else SheHeIt would have placed us closer to the center) But it is very  clear that any force that could creat such, would have motives well beyond our understanding, and is  perfectly capable of hiding from our pretty feeble science. My current favorite hypothesis is the "universe as a lab-project" theory.

Singularity. Dont forget the distinct possibility that we could get past "death". Medical science,  chemistry, computer science, all expanding faster then the universe. This laptop, transported only 40  years into the past, would be magic. The science of that period would not even be able to analyze it,  they would have simply given up, and decided it was some sort of trick. Who knows what another 40 will  bring. Your children may in fact not die at all. (I have heard the assertion that half the people who have ever lived are still alive, but it was too much work to confirm/deny.)

What to tell the kids about life and death? As mentioned earlier, kids handle it better than many adults. Perhaps they are closer to not-life. Maybe they remember that not being alive was not at all  painful. Or maybe they are just stupid kids. Just tell them: Life is Interesting--likely lots of fun,  even more likely, lots of sadness. Dont worry about it, just study the interesting parts, enjoy the  good parts, and tough-out the bad. Work hard, but not too hard, plan ahead, bring her flowers, always store beer in a dark place. And if you take any of your Baptist friends fishing with you, always take  at least two.

Death? "Dont trust anyone who claims to know the answer to that."
'Everything has been said, but nobody listens and we have to keep going over it again.' André Gide

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Offline Bereft_of_Faith

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Re: Is this okay?
« Reply #23 on: July 01, 2012, 01:08:44 AM »
Death is to be feared, especially by children.  The death of oneself is almost unimportant, but the death of those whom we love, and worse yet, depend upon, is a terrifying thought.  Even worse yet, the death of a loved one can be even more traumatic and longer lasting than one may fear.

In an attempt to provide some consolation, we must construct some response.  A small child who has just lost his/her parent may need to hear something comforting.  This holds even for many adults as well.  When you're dead, you're dead may be absolutely true, but kindness requires a bit more tact, IMO.

I agree, that a lie is a bad idea, but the way the OP was able to phrase it seems ideal.  I also agree that 'watching over', might not be a good notion to implant.  It prolongs grief, since there is an illusion that one can still interact in some way with the deceased.

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Re: Is this okay?
« Reply #24 on: July 01, 2012, 09:09:55 AM »
I don't know that kids are not as worried about death as adults are. It probably varies from child to child. I remember being absolutely, cold-sweat terrified of the notion--the inescapable fact of my own mortality from the age of 5 or 6. The only "death" I had experience with at that point was the knowledge that I'd had a twin sister who died at birth, and the baby brother who likewise never came to be after being born prematurely.

Due to the fact that we moved from England to the USA when I was fairly young, and all my extended family were either in England or Poland, I didn't grow up particularly close to uncles, aunts, grandparents, etc, and their deaths really never fazed me. My parents are still alive and well; I've never had siblings in my actual experience, and being a bit of a loner, I never had a lot of friends. Those I have are likwise still with us. But I remain terrified of the thought of my own demise over and above that of anyone else other than my children. I've worried that this is a serious flaw in my personality.

Offline IAmFirst

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Re: Is this okay?
« Reply #25 on: July 01, 2012, 09:25:11 PM »
Thing about death is everyone, ALL of us fear the aspect of it, like how it's going to happen. Tortured to death, a painless heart attack while we sleep or anything in between.

Teach the kids to do everything possible to be safe, eat right, act right, and it can be a long way off.

I'm 41 years old now. I remember being 12 and thinking this age was not years away, but eons away. Still, I've had friends and relatives pass away in their 20s and 30s. So pray if you'd like, but death is an absolute for any mortal creature, believer or not.
« Last Edit: July 01, 2012, 09:27:28 PM by IAmFirst »
2nd of all, if all you believe in is peer-reviewed papers, you won't go very far in life...

-- Shin :D

Offline none

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Re: Is this okay?
« Reply #26 on: July 01, 2012, 09:47:26 PM »
I left the house the other night, my 5 yr old daughter said "don't get killed" "are you coming back" type thing....
I said "I love you honey and I will come back, if I don't you must remember me"
crying and balling and what not ensued...
I said "do you want me to lie or tell you the truth?"
and she said the truth so I said "I want to come back so I say I am coming back, if I don't then remember me"...
she looked down...
then I asked her "you are learning to value life aren't you?"
and she said "yes" and lifted her head.
I hugged her and went on my way....

Offline orpat

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Re: Is this okay?
« Reply #27 on: July 02, 2012, 10:26:54 AM »
As a non-believer in any god that has been presented to me, I have been thinking recently about my children, and how to help them, as children, deal with death and loss.  An idea that stuck me the other day was to paint science in a religious context.  In other words, like this:

When we die, our bodies are turned back into light and energy.  We're reabsorbed into the earth, and we shine back into space.  All of our being is recycled into the universe.  There may come a day when pieces of ourselves are used by the universe to form new civilizations, new people, kings and queens, peasants and beggars.  Likewise, we might just be made up of pieces of a long lost civilization from the center of the galaxy.  And so, when we feel the wind in our hair and the sunlight against our face, we can be reminded that the people we have lost are all around us, keeping Earth strong and healthy.  And in that sense, they have never left us, and while they may not know it, they'll look after us until the end of time.

It's not inherently false.  It's also not assumptive, but I thought it was a nice and comforting idea, and I wanted to get some thoughts on it, just in case something comes up and I choose to fall back on it.  I don't like telling my kids, "When you die, you're gone."  But I don't want to lie to them, either.

Thoughts?

I think a good idea might be to consider the environment the child will grow up in. I mean if your kids are brought up in a highly religious neighborhood, it mightn't be a good idea to tell them things which might contradict with the rest of the populace.
I say let the kids discover on their own. Or tell them when they grow up.
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Offline orpat

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Re: Is this okay?
« Reply #28 on: July 02, 2012, 10:46:35 AM »
First of all, I want to say that kids handle death about a billion times better than adults give them credit for. It is the adults who are afraid, not the children.

Sorry, but I'll disagree a bit. Not all children can handle death easily.  :)
I for one was pretty sad about death. I knew there was no afterlife  and knew it was end of everything. I was 100% sure that I couldn't survive beyond 10 years age. I felt I was more than a 100 years old when I was 10. My first suicide attempt was probably at the age of 8.

I think there might be more like me.

As an adult I feel I can handle death much more easily than when I was a kid. So think about it :)


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