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Offline Timtheskeptic

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the kinsey scale question
« on: May 20, 2012, 04:00:14 PM »
there are some who think that the kinsey scale is true and some who do not. I'm not sure if it's true or not.

This is what Kinsey has said

Quote
Males do not represent two discrete populations, heterosexual and homosexual. The world is not to be divided into sheep and goats. It is a fundamental of taxonomy that nature rarely deals with discrete categories... The living world is a continuum in each and every one of its aspects.

 While emphasizing the continuity of the gradations between exclusively heterosexual and exclusively homosexual histories, it has seemed desirable to develop some sort of classification which could be based on the relative amounts of heterosexual and homosexual experience or response in each history [...] An individual may be assigned a position on this scale, for each period in his life. [...] A seven-point scale comes nearer to showing the many gradations that actually exist.

This is what i found on the wiki. I know it may not be the best reliable source i think. I want to know what you think. What are your opinions on the kinsey scale?
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Offline One Above All

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Re: the kinsey scale question
« Reply #1 on: May 20, 2012, 04:12:01 PM »
TBH, I used to think that everyone was bisexual to some extent; they just hadn't found someone they liked (physically) of the gender they claim not to be attracted to. However, I dismissed this because there's no evidence for it, AFAIK. In fact, all the evidence (that I know of) says otherwise.

EDIT: The problem with any conclusion is that there's not going to be any trustworthy evidence for the same reason that homosexual homophobes keep their homosexuality a secret - most people hide things that they consider abnormal. They're not going to answer a query with "Yeah, you're right. I've actually felt like some dudes were hot as ****; I just didn't think people would accept me if they knew about that."
If we assume they're telling the truth, then sure, the evidence says that some people are 100% heterosexual and others are 100% homosexual. If we assume that at least one of them is lying (which, let's face it, is very likely[1]), then the other results become useless.
 1. "Everybody lies."
« Last Edit: May 20, 2012, 04:43:45 PM by One Above All »
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Offline Quesi

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Re: the kinsey scale question
« Reply #2 on: May 20, 2012, 04:26:38 PM »
The New Kinsey Scale - According to the New Yorker (Male only)

0. So heterosexual that you think all other heterosexuals should be shot, because they seem a little gay.
 
1. So heterosexual that when a tax return or a loan application asks your gender you reply, “Straight.”
 
2. So heterosexual that the thought of two people of the same sex having intercourse doesn’t disgust you; it confuses you—“Wait a minute, if they’re both girls, which one falls asleep immediately afterward while the other one keeps babbling about her day?”
 
3. So heterosexual that when you go to see “Hugh Jackman: Back on Broadway” you can’t understand why he doesn’t just use his steel Wolverine claws to kill his backup dancers.
 
4. Heterosexual, yet still able to read the Times’ Arts & Leisure section without asking, “Who are Patti LuPone and Mandy Patinkin? School-board members from Staten Island?”
 
5. Heterosexual, but still willing to understand, at least theoretically, why two women having sex aren’t just practicing until their husbands get back from their golf date.

6. Heterosexual, yet still able to wear colors other than brown, olive green, and navy blue (but never pink or yellow, because you’re not some goddam circus clown).
 
7. Heterosexual, but sometimes fantasizes about bathing.
 
8. Heterosexual, but once, at college, glimpsed a roommate naked and thought, If everyone else in the world were dead, I would have sex with that person, as long as we both kept saying, “But everyone else is still dead, right?”
 
9. Heterosexual, but once, while serving in the military, made love with a same-sex partner, and afterward said either “I was so drunk,” “Wait—does that count as sex?,” or “Whoa. At least now I can check that off my bucket list, along with hot-air ballooning.”
 
10. Heterosexual, but during sex with one’s spouse often pictures the spouse with different genitalia sprouting from his or her forehead. This is not to be confused with imagining your spouse’s forehead as a place to hold keys, or to hang up your windbreaker.
 
11. Heterosexual, but while on business trips will frequently have intercourse with same-sex partners, primarily because they know the best local restaurants.
 
12. You identify as bisexual because you think it will double your chances of getting a date for Saturday night.
 
13. You identify as bisexual because you think it sounds French.
 
14. So bisexual that you fantasize not only about both Brad and Angelina but also about Regis and Kelly.
 
15. So bisexual that you get Patti LuPone and Mandy Patinkin confused.

16. Almost too bisexual, because you keep approaching straight married couples on the subway and murmuring, “The answer is yes.”
 
17. Homosexual, but occasionally attracted to the opposite gender, just to get your mom’s hopes up.

18. Homosexual, but willing to look at a member of the opposite sex without howling, “Dear God in Heaven, what is that?”
 
19. Homosexual, but sometimes still fantasizes about kissing someone of the opposite sex, as an item on a scavenger hunt.

20. Homosexual, but willing to speak to heterosexuals without muttering, under your breath, “Have you ever even been to a museum?”

21. So homosexual that both partners can achieve orgasm just by debating dream casting for the next revival of “Follies.”
 
22. So homosexual that you refer to you and your partner’s genitalia as “matchy-matchy.”

23. So exclusively homosexual that you made an “It Gets Better” video aimed at kids who were raised in homes without stacks of coffee-table books.
 
24. So overwhelmingly homosexual that you dream that Patti LuPone and Mandy Patinkin are your birth parents. ?


Read more http://www.newyorker.com/humor/2011/12/12/111212sh_shouts_rudnick#ixzz1vRp2qZgh

Offline Quesi

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Re: the kinsey scale question
« Reply #3 on: May 20, 2012, 05:14:03 PM »
I guess I posted the New Yorker thing because I sort of believe the Kinsey Report, but I think it is dated. 

I KNOW that there are people who are absolutely born gay and always knew it and went through a really hard time admitting it and at times in their lives didn’t want to be gay but were. 

I am pretty sure that there are people who are born absolutely heterosexual and have absolutely no attraction to people of their gender. 

I’ve known people who “discovered” that they were gay as teenagers or young adults, or even later in life.  Sometimes the discovery had to do with an attraction to a specific individual.  Sometimes it was just an internal discovery. 

I think most of us lean (strongly?) in one direction or the other. 

Some people are transgender, and may be attracted to people of either their birth gender or their chosen gender.  Some people are born hermaphrodites, and are assigned a gender at birth.  Some young people today are choosing not to be restricted by gender, and identify as gender x.

Honestly, I think that true bisexuals have it the hardest.  I have several friends who are true bisexuals, and there are a lot of social pressures to “pick a side.”  At least this used to be true.  I’m hoping today’s young people are wiser and more accepting.   

One friend, over the course of more than a decade, lived with a woman, then lived with a man, then dated a woman, then lived with a man.  When she broke up with the first girlfriend on the list, the lesbian community was really supportive.  When she started dating the first guy, she was shunned by the lesbian community.  With a proper boyfriend, she entered the heterosexual world again, and enjoyed all of its privileges, but her lesbian social network disappeared.  When she broke up with him about three years later, and started dating a woman again she was cautiously and fairly immediately welcomed back into the lesbian world, with lots of bashing of the guy and congratulations on coming to her senses.  And her heterosexual couple world disappeared on her. 

Another thing about bisexuals, is the assumption of promiscuity.  I have often heard (both straight and gay) people fall victim to the fallacy that if someone has the capacity to be attracted to people of either gender, then they must just want to bone everyone all the time.     

Kinsey said that about 10% of us are gay.  In my neighborhood it is certainly higher.  The Family Research Council says 2-3%.  The Gay and Lesbian Task Force says 5-8%. 
But if we can't even agree on a defination, (and we really can't) then it is hard to assign a number.

Offline Timtheskeptic

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Re: the kinsey scale question
« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2012, 05:23:09 PM »
Another thing about bisexuals, is the assumption of promiscuity.  I have often heard (both straight and gay) people fall victim to the fallacy that if someone has the capacity to be attracted to people of either gender, then they must just want to bone everyone all the time.     

Yeah i heard of that too. It's quite hypocritical and really not true.

Quote
Kinsey said that about 10% of us are gay.  In my neighborhood it is certainly higher.  The Family Research Council says 2-3%.  The Gay and Lesbian Task Force says 5-8%. 
But if we can't even agree on a definition, (and we really can't) then it is hard to assign a number.

Yes, as for the numbers of how many Gays there are, the answer is "I don't know." I don't think we can know how many are gay. If anything, it's complicated. i think it's likely that sexuality is fluid.
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Offline dorke222

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Re: the kinsey scale question
« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2012, 08:20:37 AM »
1.Absolutely heterosexual
2.Dominantly hetero, every now and then homo
3.Mostly hetero,
4.bisexual
5.Mostly homo,
6.Dominantly homo,every now and then hetero
7.Absolutely homosexual

Offline kardula

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Re: the kinsey scale question
« Reply #6 on: December 19, 2012, 06:42:57 PM »
The Kinsey Scale introduced to the masses the concept of sexuality lying on a continuum as opposed to being one side or the other. Most people are not strictly homo/hetero or asexual. Most will fall closer to the middle, towards bisexuality than some of our leaders would like to think. I haven't looked in a while, but at last look it was the best that we had though it may be a little outdated.

Offline Anfauglir

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Re: the kinsey scale question
« Reply #7 on: April 25, 2013, 05:15:54 AM »
I think the biggest question I have is "why have a scale"?

I know where MY attractions lie - I can't imagine being a bit confused about it, taking a test, and thinking "oh yeah, THAT's what I am!"  It feels too much like a career aptitude test - a questionnaire works out "how straight" you are, and then tells you.....what?  How many time out of ten you should try to chat up each gender?

It makes no sense to me that an individual needs to take the test.  And for anyone else.....why do they care?  What does it matter to Bill how straight Karen or Bob are?  Sure, if he wants to ask one out, he would like to know what the possible reaction is.....but unless the idea is that we all wear sweatshirts with our Kinsey number on, I really don't see the point?
Just because you've always done it that way doesn't mean it's not incredibly stupid.
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Offline jaimehlers

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Re: the kinsey scale question
« Reply #8 on: April 25, 2013, 06:25:43 AM »
So...where does "asexual" fit on there?  Cause some people are like that too.

That's the problem with things like the Kinsey scale, it depends too much on a person's beginning assumptions.

Offline albriston

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Re: the kinsey scale question
« Reply #9 on: May 21, 2013, 08:35:07 AM »
So...where does "asexual" fit on there?  Cause some people are like that too.

That's the problem with things like the Kinsey scale, it depends too much on a person's beginning assumptions.

Asexuals are -1. Just kidding. I think it's not the scale that's what's important here. I think what's important is the point behind a scale, which is a deviation from black & white. To deviate further, just feel what you feel. And don't put yourself into a category or quantify your sexuality for the sole purpose of it's existence, even though that's what we love to do.

Offline Jag

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Re: the kinsey scale question
« Reply #10 on: May 21, 2013, 11:28:28 AM »
I think the biggest question I have is "why have a scale"?

I know where MY attractions lie - I can't imagine being a bit confused about it, taking a test, and thinking "oh yeah, THAT's what I am!"  It feels too much like a career aptitude test - a questionnaire works out "how straight" you are, and then tells you.....what?  How many time out of ten you should try to chat up each gender?

It makes no sense to me that an individual needs to take the test.  And for anyone else.....why do they care?  What does it matter to Bill how straight Karen or Bob are?  Sure, if he wants to ask one out, he would like to know what the possible reaction is.....but unless the idea is that we all wear sweatshirts with our Kinsey number on, I really don't see the point?

I don't think the purpose was to provide people with a way to determine where they personally landed on the scale - I always thought the whole point was to show the public in general that orientation is not a binary division of straight or gay?
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