Author Topic: The Bible and Tyre  (Read 934 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Dynamic

  • Student
  • **
  • Posts: 92
  • Darwins +4/-0
  • Gender: Male
  • A Young Atheist
The Bible and Tyre
« on: May 13, 2012, 05:23:13 PM »
So I saw this thing today about the city of Tyre. It was apparentaly a large and strong city. According to the bible:

"And they shall destroy the walls of Tyrus, and break down her towers: I will also scrape her dust from her...and they shall lay thy stones and thy timber and thy dust in the midst of the water...And I will make thee like the top of a rock: thou shalt be a place to spread nets upon; thou shalt be built no more: for I the LORD have spoken it, saith the Lord GOD (Ezekiel 26:4,12,14)."

"thou shalt be built no more:"



It is implying that the city will not rebuilt. However, today, the city is a active city that still exists today. It seems pretty "rebuilt" if you ask me.

"destroy the walls of Tyrus,"

If ANY of you say that "Well, Tyrus is a different city"

Tyre, in Latin, means "Tyrus"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tyre,_Lebanon
Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is not omnipotent. Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent. Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil? Is he neither able nor willing? Then why call him God?

If you want to talk through skype, message me.

Offline Graybeard

  • Global Moderator
  • ******
  • Posts: 6778
  • Darwins +546/-19
  • Gender: Male
  • Is this going somewhere?
Re: The Bible and Tyre
« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2012, 05:47:24 PM »
I'm sure there's another thread about this. If there isn't, here is the link:

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20091214050238AAcXEU6
Nobody says “There are many things that we thought were natural processes, but now know that a god did them.”

Offline Nick

  • Laureate
  • *********
  • Posts: 10504
  • Darwins +189/-8
  • Gender: Male
Re: The Bible and Tyre
« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2012, 06:26:12 PM »
It's probably on God's to do list.
Yo, put that in your pipe and smoke it.  Quit ragging on my Lord.

Tide goes in, tide goes out !!!

Offline caveat_imperator

  • Undergraduate
  • ***
  • Posts: 197
  • Darwins +6/-0
  • Gender: Male
Re: The Bible and Tyre
« Reply #3 on: May 14, 2012, 02:36:31 AM »
It's probably on God's to do list.

Along with the destruction of Egypt.
Aaaaany day now.  ;D
"In the end theologians are jealous of science, for they are aware that it has greater authority than do their own ways of finding “truth”: dogma, authority, and revelation. Science does find truth, faith does not. " - Jerry Coyne

Offline Dynamic

  • Student
  • **
  • Posts: 92
  • Darwins +4/-0
  • Gender: Male
  • A Young Atheist
Re: The Bible and Tyre
« Reply #4 on: May 14, 2012, 05:41:47 PM »
It's probably on God's to do list.

Along with the destruction of Egypt.
Aaaaany day now.  ;D

Aha.  ;D
Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is not omnipotent. Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent. Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil? Is he neither able nor willing? Then why call him God?

If you want to talk through skype, message me.

Offline Omen

  • Professor
  • ********
  • Posts: 5955
  • Darwins +105/-15
  • One of the fucking bad guys; not friendly, tiger!
Re: The Bible and Tyre
« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2012, 05:52:26 PM »
I briefly mentioned Tyre in another post:

http://whywontgodhealamputees.com/forums/index.php/topic,22601.msg505807.html#msg505807

In short:

The King of Tyre is often associated with Satan or Lucifer in christian theology, but the same doesn't hold true in Judaism where the adversary is not always the devil or a fallen angel.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucifer

In Judaism, "morning star" refers to the king of Babylon, who is warned[18] in Isaiah 14:12 of his coming demise at the hands of the Persians and the Medes.[19] Isaiah was living in a the time period shortly before the Babylonian Conquest of Kingdom of Judah in 586 B.C.E. Isaiah had prophetic visions about the coming result of the Babylonian Exile on Jews and the nations. By contrast, Satan is considered an angel under the direct command of the God of Israel. Satan is considered an accuser appointed by God to test men's faith, similar to a prosecutor in a court of law.

The christian reference:

A passage quite similar to that in Isaiah is found in Ezekiel 28:1–19, which is expressly directed against the king of Tyre, a city on an island that had grown rich by trade, factors alluded to in the text.[13] In Christian tradition, it too has been applied to Lucifer, because of some of the expressions contained in it.[14] But, since it does not contain the image of the Morning Star, discussion of it belongs rather to the article on Satan than to that on Lucifer.
"Religious faith is the antithesis to knowledge, it is the opposition to education, and it has to act in animosity against the free exchange of ideas.  Why? Because those things are what cause harm to a religions place in society most." - Me