Author Topic: Near Death Events Explained  (Read 3850 times)

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Offline Graybeard

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Re: Near Death Events Explained
« Reply #29 on: June 09, 2013, 06:32:35 PM »

I don't know if this is true or not but, for anyone who thinks their grandmother saw Jesus or floated around the operating room, the experiment must be a little worrying.
RELIGION, n. A daughter of Hope and Fear, explaining to Ignorance the nature of the Unknowable. Ambrose Bierce

Offline Mrjason

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Re: Near Death Events Explained
« Reply #30 on: June 11, 2013, 06:53:19 AM »
^^^ It is true - http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/7621608.stm
The research is finished now, the Dr who was conducting the research has written a book about his findings http://www.npr.org/2013/02/21/172495667/resuscitation-experiences-and-erasing-death

edit; i see you've already mentioned Dr Parnia's research in this thread. I'm really interested to see what he found.
Any one want to take bets on whether the dead people saw the pictures on the shelves?
What would really screw people up is if they had placed pictures of jesus on the shelves ;)
« Last Edit: June 11, 2013, 07:12:23 AM by Mrjason »

Offline Graybeard

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Re: Near Death Events Explained
« Reply #31 on: June 18, 2013, 05:48:25 AM »
Thanks, more about Dr Parnia here -> http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2013/apr/06/sam-parnia-resurrection-lazarus-effect "Sam Parnia – the man who could bring you back from the dead"

This British doctor specialises in resurrection and insists outdated resuscitation techniques are squandering lives that could be saved
Quote
I think that the evidence is beginning to suggest that we should keep open our minds to the possibility that memory, while obviously a scientific entity of some kind – I'm not saying it is magic or anything like that – is not neuronal."

Does he have a religious faith?

"No," he says, "and I don't have any religious way into this. But what I do know is that every area of inquiry that used to be tackled by religion or philosophy is now tackled and explained by science.
RELIGION, n. A daughter of Hope and Fear, explaining to Ignorance the nature of the Unknowable. Ambrose Bierce

Offline Star Stuff

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God is an Imaginary Friend for Grown-ups

Offline Schizoid

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Re: Near Death Events Explained
« Reply #33 on: August 12, 2013, 08:36:15 PM »
Concerning NDEs it occurred to me that the experiences in Christian dominated countries such as the U.S. are cultural.  There are people here who have NDE and see Jesus, but Jesus is part of the religious culture here in the U.S.  It's highly unlikely that someone in a Islamic nation would have a NDE and see Jesus.

It's like I told my evangelical coworker that his life-changing experience that turned him to Christianity was cultural and that if he lived in a nation that was dominated by another religion that he would likely attribute his life changing turn around to that theology if at all.

Offline Graybeard

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Re: Near Death Events Explained
« Reply #34 on: August 14, 2013, 06:57:17 PM »
It's like I told my evangelical coworker that his life-changing experience that turned him to Christianity was cultural and that if he lived in a nation that was dominated by another religion that he would likely attribute his life changing turn around to that theology if at all.

I bet that he's still convinced. : )
RELIGION, n. A daughter of Hope and Fear, explaining to Ignorance the nature of the Unknowable. Ambrose Bierce

Offline Schizoid

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Re: Near Death Events Explained
« Reply #35 on: August 17, 2013, 09:26:43 PM »
It's like I told my evangelical coworker that his life-changing experience that turned him to Christianity was cultural and that if he lived in a nation that was dominated by another religion that he would likely attribute his life changing turn around to that theology if at all.

I bet that he's still convinced. : )

Well, he has no other point of reference.  I do believe that he understands and agrees that people of other faiths are happy in their religion and attribute positive changes in their lives to their own religion, one that is different from Christianity.  It's just that Christianity is all he knows.  At least he is much more open minded than other evangelicals who are as serious as he is.

Offline Graybeard

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Re: Near Death Events Explained
« Reply #36 on: September 24, 2013, 08:54:04 AM »
Reproduced in full just in case the webpage disappears:

Strange new state of consciousness could exist for surgery patients

http://www.nbcnews.com/health/strange-new-state-consciousness-could-exist-surgery-patients-4B11217250

Bahar Gholipour LiveScience

Sep. 20, 2013 at 5:46 PM ET

One anesthetist says a possible third state of consciousness may be a state in which patients can respond to a command, but are not disturbed by the pain or the surgery.

With anesthetics properly given, very few patients wake up during surgery. However, new findings point to the possibility of a state of mind in which a patient is neither fully conscious nor unconscious, experts say.

This possible third state of consciousness may be a state in which patients can respond to a command, but are not disturbed by pain or the surgery, according to Dr. Jaideep Pandit, anesthetist at St John's College in England, who discussed the idea Thursday at The Annual Congress of the Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

Pandit dubbed this state dysanaesthesia, and said the evidence that it exists comes partly from a recent study, in which 34 surgical patients were anesthetized, and had their whole body paralyzed except for their forearm, allowing them to move their fingers in response to commands or to signify if they are awake or in pain during surgery.

One-third of patients in the study moved their finger if they were asked to, even though they were under what seemed to be adequate anesthesia, according to the study led by Dr. Ian F. Russell of Hull Royal Infirmary in England and published Sept. 12 in the journal Anaesthesia.

"What's more remarkable is that they only move their fingers if they are asked. None of the patients spontaneously responded to the surgery. They are presumably not in pain," said Pandit, who wrote an editorial about the study.

Normally, while patients are under anesthesia, doctors continuously monitor them, and administer anesthetic drugs as needed. The goal is to ensure the patient has received adequate medication to remain deeply unconscious during surgery. However, it is debated how reliable the technologies used during surgery to "measure" unconsciousness are.

"We don't have a model for consciousness," Pandit said. "It is very difficult to design a monitor, to monitor something you don't have a model for." [10 Things You Didn't Know About the Brain]

The study of 34 patients was aimed at investigating whether patients are fully unconscious when the monitoring technology commonly used in the operating rooms indicates so. The researchers kept patients' arms separated from rest of the body, which was receiving routine paralyzing drugs, by blocking the blood supply. Patients were able to move their arm if they were still conscious.

In the patients who responded to the doctor's command by moving their hand, the doctors took it as a sign of consciousness, and increased the anesthetic dose.

However, Pandit argues these patients were not "conscious." The fact that patients only responded to command, and didn't move spontaneously, shows their state of mind is different from normal consciousness, he said.

The idea of a third state of consciousness may explain the discrepancies in the reported prevalence of awareness during surgery, Pandit said. Previous surveys have shown that when patients are asked if they recalled being aware during surgery, about 1 in 500 will say they did. In contrast, a recent national survey in the United Kingdom, in which patients were not directly asked about awareness during surgery, 1 in 15,000 patients spontaneously reported they were aware during their surgery. Only 1 in 45,000 reported pain or distress during their surgery.

Together, these statistics suggest there's a state in which patients are aware but not reporting it, perhaps because it is an acceptable and neutral experience for them, Pandit said. They may be aware of their surroundings to some extent, but not concerned by this knowledge, especially because they are not in pain.

Pandit's hypothesis may serve as basis for developing anesthesia monitors in the future, he said. Although the state of dysanaesthesia seems harmless, it could be a precursor to unpleasant awareness during surgery that doctors, and patients, wish to avoid.

"It's a hypothesis for future research, it's something that we can explore further and design experiment to see if it really exist," he said.
RELIGION, n. A daughter of Hope and Fear, explaining to Ignorance the nature of the Unknowable. Ambrose Bierce

Offline Graybeard

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Re: Near Death Events Explained
« Reply #37 on: February 26, 2014, 06:34:20 AM »
SLEEP PARALYSIS

DEFINITION AND CLINICAL PRESENTATION


• A transient state of inability to move and to speak at sleep onset (hypnagogic form) or on awakening (hypnopompic form).
• Patients are subjectively awake and engaged in a mental struggle to move and to cry, but they appear to be sleeping and sometimes dreaming.
• It is commonly associated with intense fear and anxiety.
• Duration of the experience: 1 to several minutes (termination is spontaneous, or induced by touch from another person).
• Patients may or may not be able to open their eyes; ocular movements, however, are intact.
• Patients may feel unable to breathe; respiratory movements, however, are intact.
• A chest pressure (a crushing weight, the feeling of being pushed down into the bed) is commonly experienced when the subject is lying in the supine position (on his or her back).
• Sleep paralysis may be accompanied by hallucinatory experiences, including:
- The incubus: an hallucination of being suffocated by a demon sitting on the patient’s chest;
- The intruder: the feeling that a malevolent being (often unseen) is present in the room;
- Unusual bodily experiences, including the feeling of flying, floating, leaving one’s own body or seeing one’s own body from another location (“out-of-body experiences”).

• Three forms of sleep paralysis:
- Isolated sleep paralysis: sleep paralysis as an isolated complaint in
otherwise healthy individuals;
- Familial sleep paralysis: like the former, but transmitted genetically;
- Narcoleptic sleep paralysis: sleep paralysis as a symptom of Narcolepsy.

More at http://www.periodicparalysis.org/english/view.asp?x=541
RELIGION, n. A daughter of Hope and Fear, explaining to Ignorance the nature of the Unknowable. Ambrose Bierce

Offline Graybeard

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Re: Near Death Events Explained
« Reply #38 on: March 24, 2014, 07:43:50 PM »
I have removed a post that encouraged a belief in the supernatural. I also removed two responses. Please keep this thread on the topic of the understanding the nature of Near Death Experiences and do not use it for the ramblings of those of any status who see NDEs "a glimpse into the afterlife."

Thanks

GB Mod
RELIGION, n. A daughter of Hope and Fear, explaining to Ignorance the nature of the Unknowable. Ambrose Bierce