Author Topic: On being a psychopath  (Read 189 times)

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Offline Jag

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On being a psychopath
« on: January 03, 2017, 11:31:36 AM »
The Neuroscientist who discovered he is a psychopath

For anyone interested in how the brain works, the above is a cool little tidbit.
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Offline Nick

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Re: On being a psychopath
« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2017, 02:19:25 PM »
All you have to do is observe Trump.
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Online Mr. Blackwell

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Re: On being a psychopath
« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2017, 04:16:16 PM »
I remember hearing the NPR interview. Very interesting stuff.

I especially liked this quote from the article.

Quote
“I’m obnoxiously competitive. I won’t let my grandchildren win games. I’m kind of an asshole, and I do jerky things that piss people off,” he says. “But while I’m aggressive, but my aggression is sublimated. I’d rather beat someone in an argument than beat them up.”

I very very rarely let my kids win games and I never let an adult win. That's not to say I always win of coarse, I just never throw the game in an effort to make someone feel better about themselves because that is dishonest and instills a false sense of confidence. There is always the chance that someone might figure out that you are letting them win and what message does that send?

I can be an asshole and I also do jerky things that piss some people off but I also understand that I can't please everyone so there is no sense in trying. I am just myself at all times with all people. I can't help it if some people don't like me so I gave up trying to change peoples minds about me a long time ago. 

However, although I can be intimidating, I am not aggressive...physically or mentally.
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Offline eh!

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Re: On being a psychopath
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2017, 06:38:21 PM »
It would appear to me psychopaths are well equipped to succeed in modern society.
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Offline Emma286

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Re: On being a psychopath
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2017, 06:52:26 PM »
I've heard it's something like 1 in 30 people who are one. Fairly sure that was from Robert Hare's book "Without Conscience: The Disturbing World of the Psychopaths Amongst Us", as well as in a book I once read on workplace bullying written by Tim Field.

Offline junebug72

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Re: On being a psychopath
« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2017, 03:09:55 AM »
It would appear to me psychopaths are well equipped to succeed in modern society.

I don't think it's limited to modern society.   History is full of stories about Psychopaths.  First one that comes to mind is Caligula.
Belief in a cruel god makes a cruel man...Thomas Paine

Offline Jag

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Re: On being a psychopath
« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2017, 11:30:33 AM »
It would appear to me psychopaths are well equipped to succeed in modern society.

It would not surprise me in the least to discover that most highly successful business people would tick pretty high on the psychopath scale. The traits expressed by psychopathy are extremely useful in high level business positions.
"Tell people that there's an invisible man in the sky that created the entire universe and the majority believe you. Tell them the paint is wet, and they have to touch it to be sure." ~George Carlin

Offline Jag

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Re: On being a psychopath
« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2017, 11:39:02 AM »
I've heard it's something like 1 in 30 people who are one. Fairly sure that was from Robert Hare's book "Without Conscience: The Disturbing World of the Psychopaths Amongst Us", as well as in a book I once read on workplace bullying written by Tim Field.

Another good one is called "The Sociopath Next Door", author's name is beyond my recall at the moment. A really interesting point made in that book is that not all socio/psychopaths are particularly dangerous (to your physical well-being at least) because aside from the atypical brain chemistry, they are in other ways like anyone else - motivation, ambition, intelligence vary among these people the same way it does across the rest of the population.

My father is a sociopath[1], but thank Thor, not a highly ambitious one.
 1. diagnosed and indifferent to it, surprising absolutely no one
"Tell people that there's an invisible man in the sky that created the entire universe and the majority believe you. Tell them the paint is wet, and they have to touch it to be sure." ~George Carlin

Offline Emma286

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Re: On being a psychopath
« Reply #8 on: January 13, 2017, 01:47:41 PM »
I've heard it's something like 1 in 30 people who are one. Fairly sure that was from Robert Hare's book "Without Conscience: The Disturbing World of the Psychopaths Amongst Us", as well as in a book I once read on workplace bullying written by Tim Field.

Another good one is called "The Sociopath Next Door", author's name is beyond my recall at the moment. A really interesting point made in that book is that not all socio/psychopaths are particularly dangerous (to your physical well-being at least) because aside from the atypical brain chemistry, they are in other ways like anyone else - motivation, ambition, intelligence vary among these people the same way it does across the rest of the population.

My father is a sociopath[1], but thank Thor, not a highly ambitious one.
 1. diagnosed and indifferent to it, surprising absolutely no one

I own that book.  The one by Martha Stout right?  :) Haven't checked it out in a while though and I'd forgotten the author myself till just reminding myself of it! I do remember being pretty disturbed by the scenario described in it where a fraudulent psychotherapist (or something like that) does something pretty bad to a patient. Seem to recall that one said it was 1 in 25 people who was a sociopath, though wasn't sure how seriously to take that statistic either. Must have another look at it at some point, I did find it very interesting.

Jeez...I'm seriously sorry to hear that about your father! :o

When did you first find out? Or would you rather not say?

« Last Edit: January 13, 2017, 02:13:58 PM by Emma286 »

Offline Jag

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Re: On being a psychopath
« Reply #9 on: January 13, 2017, 02:21:46 PM »
Yes! Martha Stout, that's her name!

As for my dad, I found out about ten years ago that there was an actual diagnosis - I don't know if knowing that earlier (I was a teenager when the diagnosis was done) would have helped or not. But I was aware that there was something "off" about him for most of my life.

To put this in perspective, I have no interactions with my father. We live in closer proximity than any two members of our family - he's about 20 miles from my house as far as I know - but we haven't seen each other in several years, and haven't spent more than a few minutes together in 15 years or so. I don't know how he feels about it (or if he feels anything about it at all) but I certainly prefer it this way.

It's weird, I know.
"Tell people that there's an invisible man in the sky that created the entire universe and the majority believe you. Tell them the paint is wet, and they have to touch it to be sure." ~George Carlin

Offline Emma286

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Re: On being a psychopath
« Reply #10 on: January 13, 2017, 02:30:00 PM »
Yes! Martha Stout, that's her name!

As for my dad, I found out about ten years ago that there was an actual diagnosis - I don't know if knowing that earlier (I was a teenager when the diagnosis was done) would have helped or not. But I was aware that there was something "off" about him for most of my life.

To put this in perspective, I have no interactions with my father. We live in closer proximity than any two members of our family - he's about 20 miles from my house as far as I know - but we haven't seen each other in several years, and haven't spent more than a few minutes together in 15 years or so. I don't know how he feels about it (or if he feels anything about it at all) but I certainly prefer it this way.

It's weird, I know.

Thanks for answering. I can imagine that must have been a pretty scary way to grow up! I take it he and your mother didn't stay together?

I can't say I blame you on that later. I think that's understandable and not weird at all given the circumstances!

Offline Jag

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Re: On being a psychopath
« Reply #11 on: January 13, 2017, 03:25:52 PM »
I can imagine that must have been a pretty scary way to grow up!
Probably less than you think, honestly. It was my idea of normal - dad had an unpredictable temper, but he didn't get violent very often - four or five times that I can recall. We all just learned to gauge his temper by his facial expressions and behavior - imperfect, but the best tool we had - and adjusted ourselves in the way that made each of us individually less likely to be a target. He was a mean fucker, mean in ways that are hard to explain. Any display of weakness or hurt feelings had the potential to become a weapon in his hands. That part really sucked.

Quote
I take it he and your mother didn't stay together?
No, they didn't. They separated and divorced when I was a teenager.

Quote
I can't say I blame you on that later. I think that's understandable and not weird at all given the circumstances!
There's no question that my life is better when he isn't part of it. Hell, I'm better when he is absent. It was kind of hard to explain to my kids as I slowly pushed him entirely out of our lives, and they only came to really get it enough as they became adults themselves.
"Tell people that there's an invisible man in the sky that created the entire universe and the majority believe you. Tell them the paint is wet, and they have to touch it to be sure." ~George Carlin

Offline Emma286

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Re: On being a psychopath
« Reply #12 on: Yesterday at 01:17:43 PM »
I can imagine that must have been a pretty scary way to grow up!
Probably less than you think, honestly. It was my idea of normal - dad had an unpredictable temper, but he didn't get violent very often - four or five times that I can recall. We all just learned to gauge his temper by his facial expressions and behavior - imperfect, but the best tool we had - and adjusted ourselves in the way that made each of us individually less likely to be a target. He was a mean fucker, mean in ways that are hard to explain. Any display of weakness or hurt feelings had the potential to become a weapon in his hands. That part really sucked.

Thanks for explaining Jag. I guess that meant that you still felt you could never entirely be yourself around him though. That must have been difficult at times.  :(

I take it he and your mother didn't stay together?
No, they didn't. They separated and divorced when I was a teenager.

I feel bad for your mother too. I imagine it was very tough on her.  :(

There's no question that my life is better when he isn't part of it. Hell, I'm better when he is absent. It was kind of hard to explain to my kids as I slowly pushed him entirely out of our lives, and they only came to really get it enough as they became adults themselves.

Can well imagine I'd feel just the same way.

I guess although he was really mean, he wasn't dangerous?
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 01:21:22 PM by Emma286 »