Author Topic: The sounds of space  (Read 44 times)

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Online dennis

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The sounds of space
« on: Today at 06:43:19 PM »
Tres cool


This one around Saturn: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p02hwvlq

For you say, I am rich, I have prospered, and I need nothing, not realizing that you are wretched, pitiable, poor, blind and naked. (Rev 3:17)

Offline relativetruth

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Re: The sounds of space
« Reply #1 on: Today at 07:46:01 PM »
Yeah that's great.

Also, can all you science buffs explain the picture of Saturn please?

If you look at the shadow cast by the planet and you follow the edges of the shadow in the rings.
If you follow the line of the edges they do NOT meet up with the bit of Saturn that is supposedly blocking the sunlight!

Is gravity curving the light? I did not think that Saturn was massive enough! But then I have not done the maths.

Is this just an optical illusion? Or something do with the wide-angled lens used  for the picture?
God(s) exist and are imaginary

Offline xyzzy

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Re: The sounds of space
« Reply #2 on: Today at 08:18:52 PM »
Yeah that's great.

Also, can all you science buffs explain the picture of Saturn please?

If you look at the shadow cast by the planet and you follow the edges of the shadow in the rings.
If you follow the line of the edges they do NOT meet up with the bit of Saturn that is supposedly blocking the sunlight!

Is gravity curving the light? I did not think that Saturn was massive enough! But then I have not done the maths.

Is this just an optical illusion? Or something do with the wide-angled lens used  for the picture?

Well, obviously it's a conspiracy of some kind and it was photographed in someone's bedroom, or whatever.

A less tinfoil-hat explanation might be that many of those wonderful images from the Cassini mission were, in fact, mosaics. Hence the artifacts in the image.

Apparently, it's like really hard to take photos and stuff when you're a little box zooming around at something like 30 kilometers per second relative to another thing that's orbiting the sun at nearly 35,000 kilometers per hour.[1] No doubt the bible can tell us how to do it, if only we knew how to read that secret knowledge.

As it is, I think the image is the one below and here's what the JPL page says about its origin.

http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/photos/imagedetails/index.cfm?imageId=4899
http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/saturn/images/IMG004899.jpg

Quote
This portrait looking down on Saturn and its rings was created from images obtained by NASA's Cassini spacecraft on Oct. 10, 2013. It was made by amateur image processor and Cassini fan Gordan Ugarkovic. This image has not been geometrically corrected for shifts in the spacecraft perspective and still has some camera artifacts.The mosaic was created from 12 image footprints with red, blue and green filters from Cassini's imaging science subsystem. Ugarkovic used full color sets for 11 of the footprints and red and blue images for one footprint.

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov and http://www.nasa.gov/cassini .

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute/G. Ugarkovic

Yes, it's astonishing what the wretched, materialistic, can-only-examine-things-that-are-real science can do, when it goes out for a walkabout.
 1. http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/faq/FAQgeneral/
« Last Edit: Today at 08:22:40 PM by xyzzy »
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself - and you are the easiest person to fool -- Richard Feynman
You are in a maze of twisty little religions, all alike -- xyzzy

Offline Nick

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Re: The sounds of space
« Reply #3 on: Today at 08:52:18 PM »
Are we talking space space or the space in some peoples heads?
Yo, put that in your pipe and smoke it.  Quit ragging on my Lord.

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Online DVZ3

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Re: The sounds of space
« Reply #4 on: Today at 09:28:44 PM »

One of the most profound and beautiful pictures of Saturn.  It has the Earth in it's background billions of miles away that only appears as a small spec with the Cassini Probe taking this picture with the sun's light directly behind it, illuminating its features.  This was my background pic for a while on my desktop box. Perspective is everything...

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/70340966/Saturn%20Cassini%20Space%20Probe.png
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Online dennis

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Re: The sounds of space
« Reply #5 on: Today at 10:34:32 PM »
DVZIII

Why would you think I would (possibly) have any motive beyond the obvious?

I ask because I got a similar sentiment elsewhere.
For you say, I am rich, I have prospered, and I need nothing, not realizing that you are wretched, pitiable, poor, blind and naked. (Rev 3:17)