Author Topic: Entirely unapologetic, pro-science thread (post your best!)  (Read 14753 times)

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Offline trustno1

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Re: Entirely unapologetic, pro-science thread (post your best!)
« Reply #29 on: October 26, 2008, 09:24:32 AM »
Jacob Bronowski

Quote
...It was done by arrogance, it was done by dogma, it was done by ignorance. When people believe that they have absolute knowledge, with no test in reality, this is how they behave. This is what men do when they aspire to the knowledge of gods...

                                 -- Jacob Bronowski 
                                    The Ascent of Man

Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Here's how the oh so moral Jacob Bronowski was employed then:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aerial_bombing_of_cities#European_theatre
Quote
In 1942, the goals of the British attacks were defined: the primary goal was the so called "morale bombing", to weaken the will of the civil population to resist. Following this directive intensive bombing of highly populated city centers and working class quarters started. On 30 May 1942, the RAF Bomber Command launched the first "1,000 bomber raid" when 1,046 aircraft bombed Cologne in Operation Millennium, dropping over 2,000 tons of high explosive and incendiaries were dropped on the medieval town and burning it from end to end. Only 384 civilians and 85 soldiers were killed, but thousands left the city.

Two further 1,000 bomber raids were executed over Essen and Bremen, but to less effect than the destruction at Cologne. The effects of the massive raids using a combination of blockbuster bombs and incendiaries created firestorms in some cites. The most extreme examples were caused by the bombing of Hamburg in Operation Gomorrah (45,000 dead), and the bombings of Kassel (10,000 dead), Darmstadt (12,500 dead), Pforzheim (21,200 dead), Swinemuende (23,000 dead), and Dresden (estimated 25,000 to 35,000 dead).

The Allies also bombed urban areas in the other countries, including occupied France (Caen). Some cities were bombed at the different times by the Luftwaffe and the Allies, for example Belgrade in Yugoslavia or Bucharest in Romania...

Of course it's already well-known what Bronowski's good buds Szilard and Einstein were doing for the early promotion of WMD development, culminating in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, while Bronowski was planning bombing runs against civilians...  Let's come down off our high moral horses, and recognize once and for all that WWII was a senseless pointless bloodbath, with culpability for gross imperial hubris attributable to all sides taking part in that insanity.  And Bronowski, Szilard and Einstein didn't just play along, they were active, eager participants.  I'm betting that not one in a thousand even knows what the "pacifist" Einstein was employed doing, or was supposed to be trying to do, during WWII.  Nazi imperial hubris was bad and it was nuts, so was Japanese imperial hubris bad and nuts, and so were British, US, and Zionist imperial hubris bad and nuts.  And we live with it today as these very same kinds of nutjobs push for the destruction of Afghanistan, Iraq, Lebanon, Iran... Same old same old stuff:  Capture the moral high ground, paint the enemy as the barbarian, and then proceed to wipe out his innocent children.
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Re: Entirely unapologetic, pro-science thread (post your best!)
« Reply #30 on: October 26, 2008, 09:30:06 AM »
Trustno1,

Do you consider yourself a misanthrope?
You believe evolution and there is no evidence for that. Where is the fossil record of a half man half ape. I've only ever heard about it in reading.

Offline PingTheServer

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Re: Entirely unapologetic, pro-science thread (post your best!)
« Reply #31 on: October 26, 2008, 02:11:35 PM »
Trustno1,

Do you consider yourself a misanthrope?

I consider him ignorant.  They were trying to end the war, free Europe from German OCCUPATION...and oh by the way, save the Jews.

Of course there was atrocities on both sides.  Why do you think we bombed those cities anyway?  Why?  Could it at all have been related to destroying the war machine's infrastructure like steel, ball bearings, motors, engines...and forcibly moving the enslaved workers so that the allies might free Europe and Africa from the most successfully evil men since God himself?

Offline Irish

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Re: Entirely unapologetic, pro-science thread (post your best!)
« Reply #32 on: October 26, 2008, 07:59:30 PM »
Quote
And Bronowski, Szilard and Einstein didn't just play along, they were active, eager participants.  I'm betting that not one in a thousand even knows what the "pacifist" Einstein was employed doing, or was supposed to be trying to do, during WWII

Einstein was not a great contributor to the development of atomic weapons.  He was presented with a few ideas and he gave his reasoning on if they were plausible or not based upon his new theory of relativity.

Taken from http://www.doug-long.com/einstein.htm ...

The atomic bomb related work that Einstein did was very limited and he completed it in two days during December 1941. Vannevar Bush, who was coordinating the scientific work on the a-bomb at that time, asked Einstein's advice on a theoretical problem involved in separating fissionable material by gaseous diffusion. But Bush and other leaders in the atomic bomb project excluded Einstein from any other a-bomb related work. Bush didn't trust Einstein to keep the project a secret: "I am not at all sure... [Einstein] would not discuss it in a way that it should not be discussed."

Furthermore, Einstein personally said to Niels Bohr:

As the realization of nuclear weapons grew near, Einstein looked beyond the current war to future problems that such weapons could bring. He wrote to physicist Niels Bohr in December 1944, "when the war is over, then there will be in all countries a pursuit of secret war preparations with technological means which will lead inevitably to preventative wars and to destruction even more terrible than the present destruction of life."

Later on Einstein wrote:

"I have always condemned the use of the atomic bomb against Japan."

And then finally... five months before he died he wrote:

"I made one great mistake in my life... when I signed the letter to President Roosevelt recommending that atom bombs be made; but there was some justification - the danger that the Germans would make them."


Please don't even dare try and preach to me that one of greatest and most intelligent people to every walk was heavily involved in creating atomic weapons.  He wasn't, end of story.  He was asked questions as a consultant and recommended that Roosevelt begin research for them because he feared the Germans had the power to created an atomic bomb.  Later in his life he completely regretted that decision as noted above.
La scienze non ha nemici ma gli ignoranti.

Offline PingTheServer

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Re: Entirely unapologetic, pro-science thread (post your best!)
« Reply #33 on: October 26, 2008, 09:55:24 PM »
Like I said, he's just ignorant.

Offline Hermes

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Re: Entirely unapologetic, pro-science thread (post your best!)
« Reply #34 on: October 26, 2008, 10:18:13 PM »
Keep it positive folks, remember;

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdxJoCzLJyw[/youtube]
Smart people believe weird things because they are skilled at defending beliefs they arrived at for non-smart reasons. --Michael Shermer

The history of religion is a long attempt to reconcile old custom with new reason, to find a sound theory for an absurd practice.  --Sir James George Frazer

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Re: Entirely unapologetic, pro-science thread (post your best!)
« Reply #35 on: October 26, 2008, 10:37:33 PM »
Oh that crazy Richard Dawkins and his silly cuss words in that British accent!  ;D
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Offline trustno1

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Re: Entirely unapologetic, pro-science thread (post your best!)
« Reply #36 on: October 27, 2008, 01:16:48 AM »
...Why do you think we bombed those cities anyway?  Why?  Could it at all have been related to destroying the war machine's infrastructure like steel, ball bearings, motors, engines...

No, the RAF explicitly stated its intent not to employ precision bombing of such targets as you've listed.  Bronowski's job throughout the war was to plan bombing runs under the aegis of this "mission statement."  Again, with relevant sections bolded:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aerial_bombing_of_cities#European_theatre
Quote
In 1942, the goals of the British attacks were defined: the primary goal was the so called "morale bombing", to weaken the will of the civil population to resist. Following this directive intensive bombing of highly populated city centers and working class quarters started. On 30 May 1942, the RAF Bomber Command launched the first "1,000 bomber raid" when 1,046 aircraft bombed Cologne in Operation Millennium, dropping over 2,000 tons of high explosive and incendiaries were dropped on the medieval town and burning it from end to end...

Compare to a typical dictionary definition of a tactic we've heard much about in recent years:

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/terrorism
Quote
Noun 1. terrorism - the calculated use of violence (or the threat of violence) against civilians in order to attain goals that are political or religious or ideological in nature; this is done through intimidation or coercion or instilling fear.
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Offline trustno1

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Re: Entirely unapologetic, pro-science thread (post your best!)
« Reply #37 on: October 27, 2008, 01:52:26 AM »
Einstein was not a great contributor to the development of atomic weapons...

Every schoolboy in Gottingen knows that Einstein wasn't involved in the Manhattan project, but Internet bytes are cheaper than grey matter, to paraphrase Hilbert.

He worked for the US Navy's Bureau of Ordnance on conventional marine torpedoes.  From the information publicly available, it appears that his employment was not a notable success.  At any rate, the job was acquired through Einstein's own volition, having informed Vannevar Bush that he desired a more active personal role in the war effort.
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Offline trustno1

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Re: Entirely unapologetic, pro-science thread (post your best!)
« Reply #38 on: October 27, 2008, 01:58:30 AM »
Trustno1,

Do you consider yourself a misanthrope?

I really, really like humans.  Therefore I really, really dislike war and the half-truths that always evolve out of war propaganda, in turn leading to more war.
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Re: Entirely unapologetic, pro-science thread (post your best!)
« Reply #39 on: October 27, 2008, 05:49:11 AM »
Trustno1,

Do you consider yourself a misanthrope?

I really, really like humans.  Therefore I really, really dislike war and the half-truths that always evolve out of war propaganda, in turn leading to more war.

More often than not you seem to codemn humans for acting like humans. There are some things that can't change in short periods of time.

We fight with each other, and we kill each other when conditions, educational and economical, are poor. We are group animals, and groups remain cohesive by behaving certain ways.

You believe evolution and there is no evidence for that. Where is the fossil record of a half man half ape. I've only ever heard about it in reading.

Offline Hermes

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Re: Entirely unapologetic, pro-science thread (post your best!)
« Reply #40 on: October 27, 2008, 06:36:30 AM »
Trustno1, stop cr@pping on my thread.  Say something pro-science or start your own.
Smart people believe weird things because they are skilled at defending beliefs they arrived at for non-smart reasons. --Michael Shermer

The history of religion is a long attempt to reconcile old custom with new reason, to find a sound theory for an absurd practice.  --Sir James George Frazer

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Re: Entirely unapologetic, pro-science thread (post your best!)
« Reply #41 on: October 27, 2008, 11:21:25 AM »
Since we are on the topic of Einstein, here is a short biography of one of the greatest physicists, mathmeticians, or just call him genious.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LicBEjX6WK8&feature=related[/youtube]
La scienze non ha nemici ma gli ignoranti.

Offline trustno1

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Re: Entirely unapologetic, pro-science thread (post your best!)
« Reply #42 on: October 28, 2008, 01:27:46 PM »
Trustno1, stop cr@pping on my thread.  Say something pro-science or start your own.

You derailed your own thread with the smuggled, purely political, perfectly non-scientific polemics of Bronowski and then Cromwell.  Both men, and even more so Leo Szilard, were active participants in brutal, Bronze Age mass murder campaigns.  I have every right to point this out, if not the duty.  Being "thread starter" does not confer a magic immunity allowing for the dissemination of antique half-truths with impunity.

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Offline Deus ex Machina

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Re: Entirely unapologetic, pro-science thread (post your best!)
« Reply #43 on: October 28, 2008, 05:12:15 PM »
Trustno1, might I suggest that the best place to tackle these issues would be in a separate thread?
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Re: Entirely unapologetic, pro-science thread (post your best!)
« Reply #44 on: December 13, 2008, 12:00:16 AM »
Tik Tik Tik Tik Tik-taa lik!

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B9h1tR42QYA[/youtube]

THE TIKTAALIK SONG

Tiktaalik (Your Inner Fish)
Written and Performed by The Indoorfins

From the water to the land I
Learn to swim and learn to stand I'm
Found here by the hands of Neil Shubin
Carry me home
To find the Inner fish unknown

Here on the cusp
Between fish and tetrapod
Lie the skeletal remains
In permafrost. Amphibiously name them
Tiktaalik

Carry me 3,000 miles in a plaster jacket
all the way from Ellesmere Island
In the back seat of a rocket
Fly me 'round the world to find my inner fish

Coming up to take a breath and
Have to use my rubber neck 'cause
I see some sheilas on the bank
And I'm built for looking up
Crawl on all fours, and do some push ups on the shore

375 million years or more
An ancient salamander caged inside a cliff
No longer to meander
Tiktaalik

Carry me 3,000 miles in a jacket of plaster
All the way from Ellesmere Island
Cargo on the helicopter
Fly me 'round the world to find my inner fish

Evolution, revolution, Darwinism, skepticism.
Bulging eyes and fleshy pecs,
Dotted with some colored specks.
One glance, second chance, come upon you... happen-stance.
Tik taa lik!

Carry me 3,000 miles in a plaster jacket
All the way from Ellesmere Island
In the back seat of a rocket
Fly me 'round the world to find my inner fish


Source:http://www.upenn.edu/nso/prp/fish/song.html
Smart people believe weird things because they are skilled at defending beliefs they arrived at for non-smart reasons. --Michael Shermer

The history of religion is a long attempt to reconcile old custom with new reason, to find a sound theory for an absurd practice.  --Sir James George Frazer

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Re: Entirely unapologetic, pro-science thread (post your best!)
« Reply #45 on: December 13, 2008, 12:06:11 AM »
Oh my gosh, that was awesome!  :D
La scienze non ha nemici ma gli ignoranti.

Offline Hermes

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Re: Entirely unapologetic, pro-science thread (post your best!)
« Reply #46 on: December 13, 2008, 12:08:22 AM »
Oh my gosh, that was awesome!  :D

Can't not be happy with a tune like that.  I'm playing it in a loop before I head off to sleep.
Smart people believe weird things because they are skilled at defending beliefs they arrived at for non-smart reasons. --Michael Shermer

The history of religion is a long attempt to reconcile old custom with new reason, to find a sound theory for an absurd practice.  --Sir James George Frazer

Offline Hermes

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Re: Entirely unapologetic, pro-science thread (post your best!)
« Reply #47 on: December 13, 2008, 12:26:25 AM »
Recycled Universe

Loop Quantum Cosmology - The universe may have come from ... the universe

Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20026861.500-did-our-cosmos-exist-before-the-big-bang.html?full=true

Abstract: http://link.aps.org/abstract/PRL/v96/e141301

Did our cosmos exist before the big bang?

ABHAY ASHTEKAR remembers his reaction the first time he saw the universe bounce. "I was taken aback," he says. He was watching a simulation of the universe rewind towards the big bang. Mostly the universe behaved as expected, becoming smaller and denser as the galaxies converged. But then, instead of reaching the big bang "singularity", the universe bounced and started expanding again. What on earth was happening?

Ashtekar wanted to be sure of what he was seeing, so he asked his colleagues to sit on the result for six months before publishing it in 2006. And no wonder. The theory that the recycled universe was based on, called loop quantum cosmology (LQC), had managed to illuminate the very birth of the universe - something even Einstein's general theory of relativity fails to do.

Quote
Einstein's relativity fails to explain the very birth of the universe

LQC has been tantalising physicists since 2003 with the idea that our universe could conceivably have emerged from the collapse of a previous universe. Now the theory is poised to make predictions we can actually test. If they are verified, the big bang will give way to a big bounce and we will finally know the quantum structure of space-time. Instead of a universe that emerged from a point of infinite density, we will have one that recycles, possibly through an eternal series of expansions and contractions, with no beginning and no end.

LQC is in fact the first tangible application of another theory called loop quantum gravity, which cunningly combines Einstein's theory of gravity with quantum mechanics. We need theories like this to work out what happens when microscopic volumes experience an extreme gravitational force, as happened near the big bang, for example. In the mid 1980s, Ashtekar rewrote the equations of general relativity in a quantum-mechanical framework. Together with theoretical physicists Lee Smolin and Carlo Rovelli, Ashtekar later used this framework to show that the fabric of space-time is woven from loops of gravitational field lines. Zoom out far enough and space appears smooth and unbroken, but a closer look reveals that space comes in indivisible chunks, or quanta, 10-35 square metres in size.

In 2000, Martin Bojowald, then a postdoc with Ashtekar at the Pennsylvania State University in University Park, used loop quantum gravity to create a simple model of the universe. LQC was born.

Bojowald's major realisation was that unlike general relativity, the physics of LQC did not break down at the big bang. Cosmologists dread the singularity because at this point gravity becomes infinite, along with the temperature and density of the universe. As its equations cannot cope with such infinities, general relativity fails to describe what happens at the big bang. Bojowald's work showed how to avoid the hated singularity, albeit mathematically. "I was very impressed by it," says Ashtekar, "and still am."

Jerzy Lewandowski of the University of Warsaw in Poland, along with Bojowald, Ashtekar and two more of his postdocs, Parampreet Singh and Tomasz Pawlowski, went on to improve on the idea. Singh and Pawlowski developed computer simulations of the universe according to LQC, and that's when they saw the universe bounce. When they ran time backwards, instead of becoming infinitely dense at the big bang, the universe stopped collapsing and reversed direction. The big bang singularity had truly disappeared (Physical Review Letters, vol 96, p 141301).

But the celebration was short-lived. When the team used LQC to look at the behaviour of our universe long after expansion began, they were in for a shock - it started to collapse, challenging everything we know about the cosmos. "This was a complete departure from general relativity," says Singh, who is now at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Canada. "It was blatantly wrong."

Ashtekar took it hard. "I was pretty depressed," he says. "It didn't bode well for LQC." However, after more feverish mathematics, Ashtekar, Singh and Pawlowski solved the problem. Early versions of the theory described the evolution of the universe in terms of quanta of area, but a closer look revealed a subtle error. Ashtekar, Singh and Pawlowski corrected this and found that the calculations now involved tiny volumes of space.

It made a crucial difference. Now the universe according to LQC agreed brilliantly with general relativity when expansion was well advanced, while still eliminating the singularity at the big bang. Rovelli, based at the University of the Mediterranean in Marseille, France, was impressed. "This was a very big deal," he says. "Everyone had hoped that once we learned to treat the quantum universe correctly, the big bang singularity would disappear. But it had never happened before."

Physicist Claus Kiefer at the University of Cologne in Germany, who has written extensively about the subject, agrees. "It is really a new perspective on how we can view the early universe," he says. "Now, you have a theory that can give you a natural explanation for a singularity-free universe." He adds that while competing theories of quantum gravity, such as string theory, have their own insights to offer cosmology, none of these theories has fully embraced quantum mechanics.

If LQC turns out to be right, our universe emerged from a pre-existing universe that had been expanding before contracting due to gravity. As all the matter squeezed into a microscopic volume, this universe approached the so-called Planck density, 5.1 × 1096 kilograms per cubic metre. At this stage, it stopped contracting and rebounded, giving us our universe.

Quote
The pre-existing universe was squeezed into a microscopic volume

"You cannot reach the Planck density. It is forbidden by theory," says Singh. According to Bojowald, that is because an extraordinary repulsive force develops in the fabric of space-time at densities equivalent to compressing a trillion solar masses down to the size of a proton. At this point, the quanta of space-time cannot be squeezed any further. The compressed space-time reacts by exerting an outward force strong enough to repulse gravity. This momentary act of repulsion causes the universe to rebound. From then on, the universe keeps expanding because of the inertia of the big bounce. Nothing can slow it down - except gravity.

LQC also illuminates another mysterious phase of our universe. In classical cosmology, a phenomenon called inflation caused the universe to expand at incredible speed in the first fractions of a second after the big bang. This inflationary phase is needed to explain why the temperature of faraway regions of the universe is almost identical, even though heat should not have had time to spread that far - the so-called horizon problem. It also explains why the universe is so finely balanced between expanding forever and contracting eventually under gravity - the flatness problem. Cosmologists invoke a particle called the inflaton to make inflation happen, but precious little is known about it.

Cosmic recall
More importantly, even less is known about the pre-inflationary universe. Cosmologists have always assumed that they could ignore quantum effects and regard space-time as smooth at the onset of inflation, as general relativity requires. This had always been an educated guess - until now. LQC shows that at the time inflation begins, space-time can be treated as smooth. "This is not an assumption any more," says Singh. "It's actually a prediction from loop quantum cosmology."

The models developed by Ashtekar, Singh, Bojowald and Pawlowski represent an enormous step forward. This is the first time that a theory is able to make predictions about what was happening prior to inflation, while correctly predicting what happens post-inflation. "To do both of these things at the same time has been difficult," says Ashtekar.

If the universe we inhabit emerged from a previous cosmos, can we know something about the universe that preceded ours? LQC simulations show that it too would have had stars and galaxies. But opinions differ when it comes to the quantum phase just before and after the big bounce, when it is impossible to pin down the volume of the universe due to quantum fluctuations. Bojowald's calculations show that some of the information about the earlier universe is wiped out as it goes through the big bounce. In other words, there is no "cosmic recall" (Nature Physics, vol 3, p 523). In contrast, another detailed analysis done by Singh and Alejandro Corichi, of the Autonomous National University of Mexico in Michoacán, suggests otherwise (Physical Review Letters, vol 100, p 161302).

Ashtekar likens the spirited spat among his former postdocs and students to watching his children squabble. "It's much ado about nothing," he says. Though arguments about the universe possibly having a cosmic recall may be of philosophical interest, they are premature. "We should be worrying about making contact with experiments today."

That day may be near. The researchers' first target is the cosmic microwave background (CMB), a radiation released long after the universe's quantum phase. Even though the CMB originated 370,000 years after the big bang, its seeds were laid out much earlier, says Bojowald. "That could be a period when quantum gravity effects might play a role."

Bojowald has discovered that such effects would have dominated when, according to LQC, the universe went through a short phase of accelerated expansion before the onset of inflation. Dubbed superinflation, it occurred due to the immense repulsive forces of the high-density quantum universe rather than the presence of inflatons. Exactly how this phase might affect the CMB is unclear, but already there are hints that LQC might predict something different from classical cosmology. "This is what we are going to work on in the next two years. We are going to find robust predictions," says Singh.

Meanwhile, Ed Copeland of the University of Nottingham, UK, and his colleagues have shown that superinflation can produce the kind of quantum fluctuations in the fabric of space-time that eventually became seeds for the formation of galaxies and clusters of galaxies. This suggests that superinflation might make inflation unnecessary, thus removing what has essentially always been an add-on to standard cosmological theory. It is early days for superinflation, though, because it cannot yet solve the horizon and flatness problems that inflation so elegantly resolves.

Copeland says that future experiments might reveal whether our universe underwent inflation or superinflation by looking for a pattern of gravitational waves that only inflation could have created. These ripples in the fabric of space-time would have polarised the CMB, though the effect is too faint for today's instruments to detect. Things might change next year, however, when the European Space Agency launches the Planck satellite, promising the most detailed view of the microwave background to date. Copeland's work suggests that superinflation would suppress the production of gravitational waves at cosmological scales, and that there would be no such imprint in the CMB. "If you do detect them, it would probably count against LQC," he says.

Kiefer cautions that all the predictions of LQC are subject to one big caveat. The predictions of classical cosmology come from solving the equations of general relativity, albeit with certain simplifying assumptions about the universe. Ideally, LQC should be put on the same footing - all its equations should be derived from loop quantum gravity. Instead, Bojowald and others obtained LQC by starting with an idealised universe derived from general relativity and then using techniques from loop quantum gravity to quantise gravity in the model. "From a physicist's point of view, it is fully justified," says Kiefer. "Mathematicians perhaps would not be amused."

Rovelli agrees. To put LQC on a firmer foundation, he and his colleague Francesca Vidotto have been working to reconcile it with loop quantum gravity (www.arxiv.org/abs/0805.4585v1). "The conclusion is very positive," says Rovelli. "We are able to recover the equations of LQC, starting with something much closer to loop quantum gravity."

No wonder Rovelli is looking forward to upcoming experiments that could vindicate the theory. "I hope before dying to know whether loop quantum gravity is correct or not," he says. For a man who turned 50 only recently, he is being unduly pessimistic. A raft of experiments, of which Planck is only the first, will soon be measuring the CMB and looking for gravitational waves. A revolution in our notions of how our universe began may be closer than he thinks.

Quote
Will our universe bounce?
According to the big bounce picture formulated by theoretical physicist Abhay Ashtekar and others, the cosmos grew from the collapse of a pre-existing universe. Will the same fate await us?It depends. We used to think that the universe was dominated by the gravity of its stars and other matter: either the universe is dense enough for gravity to halt the expansion from the big bang and pull everything back, or else it isn't, in which case the expansion would carry on forever. However, observations of distant supernovae in the past 10 years have challenged that view. They show not just that the universe is expanding, but also that the expansion is speeding up due to a mysterious repulsive force that cosmologists call "dark energy". So if the universe fails to contract, has it already bounced its last bounce?Perhaps not. Cosmologists are still very much in the dark about dark energy. Some theoretical models speculate that the nature of dark energy could change over time, switching from a repulsive to an attractive force that behaves much like gravity. If that happens, the universe will stop expanding and the galaxies will begin to rush together. A question mark also hangs over the universe's matter and energy density, which we have not measured with sufficient accuracy to be sure that the universe will not eventually stop expanding. If it turns out to be a smidgen greater than current observations, then it is a recipe for cosmic collapse.According to the big bounce, in both scenarios the universe will eventually collapse until it reaches the highest density allowed by the theory. At this point, the universe will rebound and begin expanding again - the ultimate in cosmic recycling.
Smart people believe weird things because they are skilled at defending beliefs they arrived at for non-smart reasons. --Michael Shermer

The history of religion is a long attempt to reconcile old custom with new reason, to find a sound theory for an absurd practice.  --Sir James George Frazer

Offline Irish

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Re: Entirely unapologetic, pro-science thread (post your best!)
« Reply #48 on: December 13, 2008, 12:53:28 AM »
Oh my gosh, that was awesome!  :D

Can't not be happy with a tune like that.  I'm playing it in a loop before I head off to sleep.

Not only is evolution fun to learn about... but now it has a catchy beat.

Tik tik tik tik tik-taa lik  :)
La scienze non ha nemici ma gli ignoranti.

Offline Hermes

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Re: Entirely unapologetic, pro-science thread (post your best!)
« Reply #49 on: December 13, 2008, 01:12:50 AM »
Not to knock the LHC rap (below) but this one is a definite ear worm.

LHC Rap
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j50ZssEojtM[/youtube]
Smart people believe weird things because they are skilled at defending beliefs they arrived at for non-smart reasons. --Michael Shermer

The history of religion is a long attempt to reconcile old custom with new reason, to find a sound theory for an absurd practice.  --Sir James George Frazer

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Re: Entirely unapologetic, pro-science thread (post your best!)
« Reply #50 on: December 13, 2008, 04:08:15 AM »
That was great!

Stephen Hawking in the background... the pimpin' foreign car with 'CERN' on it... in the credits the back-up dancers "prefer anonymity"... the video was actually taken at the LHC... good times... good times.
La scienze non ha nemici ma gli ignoranti.

Offline Hermes

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Smart people believe weird things because they are skilled at defending beliefs they arrived at for non-smart reasons. --Michael Shermer

The history of religion is a long attempt to reconcile old custom with new reason, to find a sound theory for an absurd practice.  --Sir James George Frazer

Offline Hermes

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Re: Entirely unapologetic, pro-science thread (post your best!)
« Reply #52 on: December 13, 2008, 05:42:01 PM »
Building Tiktaalik
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MkOy1XU0cbY[/youtube]
Smart people believe weird things because they are skilled at defending beliefs they arrived at for non-smart reasons. --Michael Shermer

The history of religion is a long attempt to reconcile old custom with new reason, to find a sound theory for an absurd practice.  --Sir James George Frazer

Offline Hermes

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Re: Entirely unapologetic, pro-science thread (post your best!)
« Reply #53 on: December 18, 2008, 09:20:43 AM »
The element song
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SmwlzwGMMwc[/youtube]

Other versions;
http://www.privatehand.com/flash/elements.html

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DYW50F42ss8[/youtube]


Lyrics by Tom Lehrer;

Quote
There's antimony, arsenic, aluminum, selenium,
And hydrogen and oxygen and nitrogen and rhenium,
And nickel, neodymium, neptunium, germanium,
And iron, americium, ruthenium, uranium,
Europium, zirconium, lutetium, vanadium,
And lanthanum and osmium and astatine and radium,
And gold and protactinium and indium and gallium, (gasp)
And iodine and thorium and thulium and thallium.

There's yttrium, ytterbium, actinium, rubidium,
And boron, gadolinium, niobium, iridium,
And strontium and silicon and silver and samarium,
And bismuth, bromine, lithium, beryllium, and barium.

There's holmium and helium and hafnium and erbium,
And phosphorus and francium and fluorine and terbium,
And manganese and mercury, molybdenum, magnesium,
Dysprosium and scandium and cerium and cesium.
And lead, praseodymium and platinum, plutonium,
Palladium, promethium, potassium, polonium,
And tantalum, technetium, titanium, tellurium, (gasp)
And cadmium and calcium and chromium and curium.

There's sulfur, californium and fermium, berkelium,
And also mendelevium, einsteinium, nobelium,
And argon, krypton, neon, radon, xenon, zinc and rhodium,
And chlorine, carbon, cobalt, copper, tungsten, tin and sodium.

These are the only ones of which the news has come to Hahvard,
And there may be many others but they haven't been discahvered.

Smart people believe weird things because they are skilled at defending beliefs they arrived at for non-smart reasons. --Michael Shermer

The history of religion is a long attempt to reconcile old custom with new reason, to find a sound theory for an absurd practice.  --Sir James George Frazer

Offline velkyn

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Re: Entirely unapologetic, pro-science thread (post your best!)
« Reply #54 on: December 18, 2008, 01:27:25 PM »
ah, I need to get out my old vinyls of Tom L. 
"There is no use in arguing with a man who can multiply anything by the square root of minus 1" - Pirates of Venus, ERB

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Offline Hermes

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Re: Entirely unapologetic, pro-science thread (post your best!)
« Reply #55 on: December 18, 2008, 11:58:46 PM »
The Official Theme Song for Happy Monkey! (New York Dolls)
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8DkD9j9RlxI[/youtube]
Smart people believe weird things because they are skilled at defending beliefs they arrived at for non-smart reasons. --Michael Shermer

The history of religion is a long attempt to reconcile old custom with new reason, to find a sound theory for an absurd practice.  --Sir James George Frazer

Offline Hermes

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Re: Entirely unapologetic, pro-science thread (post your best!)
« Reply #56 on: January 27, 2009, 12:18:36 PM »
The amputees will get limbs, and the blind will see;

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WXNnLleE2Kc[/youtube]

Smart people believe weird things because they are skilled at defending beliefs they arrived at for non-smart reasons. --Michael Shermer

The history of religion is a long attempt to reconcile old custom with new reason, to find a sound theory for an absurd practice.  --Sir James George Frazer

Offline Hermes

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Re: Entirely unapologetic, pro-science thread (post your best!)
« Reply #57 on: January 27, 2009, 12:25:22 PM »
A few notes for anti-stem cell Christians in the USA;

1. The previous child is being cured by stem cell injections.

2. In China, not the USA.

3. If the USA did not have such a backward policy for the last 8 years, this child may have had these treatments years earlier.  That means she might have had normal eyesight.  Right now, it's iffy.  8 years is a long time not to have brain structures grow that are needed to integrate sight completely.

4. Extrapolate; what have your moral concerns about clumps of 100 undifferentiated cells gotten you?  What have your morals cost people in life and needless suffering?  Who will suffer and die due to your uninformed and barbaric morality?
Smart people believe weird things because they are skilled at defending beliefs they arrived at for non-smart reasons. --Michael Shermer

The history of religion is a long attempt to reconcile old custom with new reason, to find a sound theory for an absurd practice.  --Sir James George Frazer