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Christianity Johnson on 25 Nov 2008 12:00 am

Here is the definition of Evangelical Christianity

What is the definition of evangelical Christianity, also known as Christian Fundamentalism? This article lays it out, and it is frightening:

The Psychology of Christian Fundamentalism

The four components of evangelical Christian belief are:

(1) Inerrancy or biblical literalism, the belief that every word of the Bible is to be taken literally as the word of God;

(2) conversion or the experience of being reborn in Christ;

(3) evangelicalism or the duty of the saved to spread the gospel; and

(4) Apocalypticism or Endism, the belief that The Book of Revelations describes the events that must come to pass for God’s plan to be fulfilled.

If you have ever wondered what is going on inside the heads of the millions of fundamentalists in the United States, this in-depth and fascinating article will unravel it for you.

The author calls fundamentalism a disorder. You see the disorder starting at item 1 in the definition. How could anyone in their right mind believe that the Bible is literally true? There are so many contradictions and so much obvious, flaming nonsense in the Bible that any person with the smallest amount of intelligence can detect it. And yet, apparently, millions are immune to that simple act of detection.

Since anyone should be able to detect the obvious problems in the Bible, but millions fail to do so, we must ask, “Why?” The article attempts to explain it as a psychological disorder.

The question would have to be: Is there any way to heal these people and break their delusion? Or are they so damaged in childhood that it is hopeless?

The fact that such severe psychological damage is done to so many children by religion should be reason enough to work toward eliminating religion from our society.

If you are a Christian and you would like to better understand the nature of your delusion, this free book can help:

- Whywontgodhealamputees.com

8 Responses to “Here is the definition of Evangelical Christianity”

  1. on 25 Nov 2008 at 1:21 am 1.Hermes said …

    Christians! I’ve got a question about this part …

    “(4) Apocalypticism or Endism, the belief that The Book of Revelations describes the events that must come to pass for God’s plan to be fulfilled.”

    … OK, not specifically, but it is related.

    Q. Can anyone tell me if, before the year 1800, there were any extra-Biblical comments recorded about ‘the rapture’ by anyone?

    Link: http://whywontgodhealamputees.com/forums/index.php?topic=1777

    Note that I am not talking about after 1800, or any reference in the Bible itself. I’m talking about anyone who mentioned anything as a comment on ‘the rapture’ if and only if they did so before the year 1800. They may mention the Bible, and even quote from it, but the reference must not be only in the Bible. They must mention ‘the rapture’ itself.

  2. on 25 Nov 2008 at 1:49 am 2.Anonymous said …

    Fascinating. More on the history of “The Rapture”:

    http://christianity.about.com/od/faqhelpdesk/a/whatisrapture_3.htm

  3. on 13 Jan 2011 at 7:24 am 3.Allison said …

    I totally agree that the evangelical belief system is not psychologically healthy. That being said, I do want to say I’m a Christian, but not that kind. Its really upseting and heart-breaking to me that I always have to quantify my faith like that- “I’m a Christian, but not that kind”. I like liberation theology- seeing the bible as a way of understanding the poor and suffering, and hope that can come. But *always* within the story’s own historical and cultural context. I actually disagree with all four of the aspects mentioned… I do not believe in evangelizing. I believe in loving people and building honest and genuine relationships. If i’m friends with someone, they will figure out where I am spiritually. And hopefully, we can talk about the metaphysical side of life without anyone trying to “win”. The conversion thing… I can take or leave. I just don’t care about it, honestly. I think there are a lot of ways to heaven. and the end times. Again, I don’t know. I don’t believe in Hell. and i don’t think when the world ends it will be anything like the actual vision desribed.
    Mostly, I understanding Christianity (my Christianity) as being rooted in love. I don’t think gays, lesbians, bisexuals, transgendered, ect. are sining for being themselves. and if i’m wrong, I will still choose to love my friends. I do believe in the death and resurrection of Christ. I can’t explain why. I am moved within my very core by the story. Its like it reverberates in my soul.

    So all of that to say, hey. we aren’t all like that. and i hate that they have stolen my religion.

    p.s. i was severely abused regularly until i was 14… no one is so damaged in childhood that they are hopeless.

    p.p.s. I’m still ordering that free book. Just to see what’s up. I like opinions.

  4. on 13 Jan 2011 at 2:08 pm 4.rael said …

    #3 Allison

    What a breath of fresh air, if only more religious people were like you…………….ah the world would be a better place

  5. on 13 Jan 2011 at 3:10 pm 5.Rostam said …

    “I like liberation theology”

    You better look into the theology a little closer. It is about hate of the supposed suppressors, guys like Jeremiah Wright. Look up his video.

    I understand you don’t want to offend others, but Jesus did. He called them vipers headed for hell.

    Jesus also evangelized and commanded us to do the same. See Matthew 28:19. He understood people were headed for hell and He loved them enough to tell them. Hell doesn’t bother you?

    Nobody stole your religion. You have made up a new one. If your beliefs have nothing to offer I suppose evangelizing wouldn’t be necessary.

  6. on 13 Jan 2011 at 3:32 pm 6.rael said …

    #5 what a shame; your lack of tolerance and understanding is astounding. You may believe what you will, Allison is expressing her beliefs, who are you to criticize? I for one applaud the open mindedness so often lacking in organised religion.

  7. on 13 Jan 2011 at 5:59 pm 7.Anti-Theist said …

    Allison is, like many, the new wave / new age Quaker; the embodiment of those whose kind freed the slaves and offered human rights to women. Thankfully her kind will also be the new majority in Christianity, only to be replaced by the next generation of Quakers until the bible and Its followers are virtually forgotten. Allison is evidence of the death of religion; another rung in the plotted circle of life being systematically displayed and irreversibly maturing finite years. Those (like Rastam who would be the first in line to stone all heretics) who cling to religion through a fear of the unknown / fear of accountability / fear of being alone will always attack the replacement for they know the truth, even if only subconsciously. I would never venture to assume you like or respect my views (Allison) but regardless, thank you for reminding us there is another type of Christian.

  8. on 13 Jan 2011 at 6:49 pm 8.Rostam said …

    “I for one applaud the open mindedness so often lacking in organised religion.”

    Rael. I am intolerant? What exactly am I prohibiting Allison from doing? I find you to be quite intolerant. Who are you to criticize me for pointing out what is taught by Christ?

    My critique of Liberation theology is quite correct and I assure you the theology is quite organized.

    Allison is free to believe what she pleases. I only point out the inconsistencies with what Christ taught. Sorry if you find that to be “intolerant”.

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