Feed on Posts or Comments 24 November 2014

Christianity &Islam Johnson on 24 Oct 2008 08:02 am

Why religion is evil

A fascinating article on the treatment of Christians in Muslim countries:

How Christians Are Treated In Muslim Lands

Excerpt:

Saudi Arabia – Conversion by a Muslim to another religion is punishable by death. Bibles are illegal. Churches are illegal. Easter celebrations are illegal. It is punishable by death for a non-mulsim to enter the “holy” muslim cities of Medina and Mecca.

In a modern, twenty-first century world that sounds ridiculous, doesn’t it? Yet it is easy to find corroboration. For example, this article opens with:

The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is an Islamic theocratic monarchy in which Islam is the official religion; the law requires that all Saudi citizens be Muslims. Religious freedom is virtually non-existent. The Government does not provide legal recognition or protection for freedom of religion, and it is severely restricted in practice. As a matter of policy, the Government guarantees and protects the right to private worship for all, including non-Muslims who gather in homes for religious practice; however, this right is not always respected in practice and is not defined in law. Moreover, the public practice of non-Muslim religions is prohibited.

Also:

Under Saudi law conversion by a Muslim to another religion is considered apostasy, a crime punishable by death if the accused does not recant.

This article says:

Islamic Saudi Arabia and communist North Korea are expected to be the world’s worst persecutors of Christians in 2008, a church persecution advocacy group predicted.

In both countries, Christianity is illegal and practice of the religion is strictly forbidden and results in severe punishments.

The CIA Factbook notes that Saudi Arabia is 100% Muslim.

What about the United States? The U.S. clearly does not officially track down and kill people because of their religion on American soil. But does the United States discriminate against Muslims in other ways? Keep in mind that the U.S. is a country that calls itself “the melting pot”, whose national motto is, “From many, one”, whose discrimination laws claim that religious discrimination is entirely illegal, and which publicly proclaims itself to be a completely neutral and accommodating to every religion. There should be zero discrimination here. Are Muslims treated in the same way as Christians?

Clearly not. In endorsing Barack Obama, Colin Powell felt it necessary to make this statement:

“I’m also troubled by, not what Sen. McCain says, but what members of the party say, and it is permitted to be said such things as: “Well, you know that Mr. Obama is a Muslim.” Well, the correct answer is: he is not a Muslim. He’s a Christian. He’s always been a Christian. But the really right answer is: What if he is? Is there something wrong with being a Muslim in this country? The answer is: No, that’s not America. Is there something wrong with some 7-year-old Muslim-American kid believing he or she can be president?”

Discrimination against Muslims is not some fringe activity. It is happening at the very highest levels of American presidential politics.

Does the United States discriminate against rational people who practice no religion? Certainly, in a hundred different ways, and at the highest levels. This article summarizes the efforts of Elizabeth Dole to publicly discriminate:

Elizabeth Dole: Equality for Atheists Not a North Carolina Value

Anywhere there is religion we find division and discrimination. In Saudi Arabia the division is extreme. But even in the United States, where the public attempt is made to tamp down the division inherent in religion, the Christian majority tries to divide people at every turn. Putting “In God We Trust” on the money makes the division as explicit as it can possibly be. That is the nature of religion.

15 Responses to “Why religion is evil”

  1. on 24 Oct 2008 at 6:36 pm 1.SteveK said …

    Sounds like the Elizabeth Dole speech was trying to pursuade people by appealing to their emotions – just like you do, Johnson.

  2. on 24 Oct 2008 at 6:46 pm 2.SteveK said …

    Hermes,
    You are a prominent figure here who has access to various GII emails so I have a few questions. Are you and Johnson the same person? Do you know Johnson and does he write his own material? Tell us about the mysterious man behind the curtain and why he’s not allowed to come out and play.

  3. on 24 Oct 2008 at 8:17 pm 3.Red O'Brien said …

    Johnson,

    Thank you very much for this blog.

    You’re doing a great service.

  4. on 25 Oct 2008 at 1:10 am 4.GotMooo said …

    SteveK, surely if you are this rational you have to have problems with your fellow Christians?

    Yes you are correct about appealing to emotions. But what are these emotions built off of? Hatred and ignorance? Or maybe understanding? Perhaps the emotions stem from rational thinking. The rational thinking is where you see how the USA is apparently where “All men are equal”. And then you see this: Elizabeth Dole: Equality for Atheists Not a North Carolina Value

    I as an Atheist/Rational get very angry when I see stuff like that. So you are partially correct that this is an appeal to our emotions. However, appealing to emotions is necessary as that is the X-Factor in getting you to stand up and fight for what you think is right.

    Do you feel it is alright to discriminate people simply because they have no religion? The Christians feel discriminated but they are actually the main people over there in the government right now making all the decisions. Few Socialists and Rationals can even get into those positions. So who do you think has the fairer end of the deal?

  5. on 25 Oct 2008 at 1:43 am 5.Hermes said …

    “Hermes,
    You are a prominent figure here who has access to various GII emails so I have a few questions. Are you and Johnson the same person? Do you know Johnson and does he write his own material? Tell us about the mysterious man behind the curtain and why he’s not allowed to come out and play.”

    I post too much. That’s about it.

    To address any curiosity: I don’t own or control or muck around with anything on the WWGHA web site(s) or the YouTube channel. Like any normal visitor, I post here in the blog like you do and signed up for a user account for the forums.

    If you want to look at my current post on the forum, go here (username Hermes);

    http://whywontgodhealamputees.com/forums/index.php?action=profile;u=383

    If you want to look at my older posts, go here (username JustMe);

    http://whywontgodhealamputees.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=2238

  6. on 25 Oct 2008 at 5:56 am 6.askin said …

    Some years ago, when a correspondent of a well-known international TV asked the Head Imam of Jeddah, what the biggest problem of Islam was,
    he got the answer:” The biggest problem is that the
    people confuse religion with traditions.”
    Nowhere in the Koran it is stated, that if a person changes his religion or if a non-Muslim enters Mecca, he should be punished by death.
    This punishment, is, I believe is a consequence
    of a tradition- not of the religion.
    Koran says: “Talk to the Christians and the Jews and tell them, your God is also our God, as God is one, and propose to them to build altogether an Abraham’s Nation. If they accept, they’d be doing the best and the most beautiful.” Koran also says:”For those who hold all the prophets of God equal, we have a big present in the other world.”
    It does not say “otherwise a death penalty should
    be executed”.
    On the other hand, Christians confuse Jesus with God although Jesus himself says in the Bible, “Do not pray to me, pray to the father!”
    Mistakes are done, traditions replace sometimes the
    religions. We should read the books of God more carefully.
    Koran also says: “As a Muslim, your first duty is to protect the books we have sent before, as much as you have them on hand.”

    Muslims, Christians, Jews, Zerdusht, Mormons all believe in God. All the books of God preach the same ethical values. And they all say, “Those who believe in God are brethern”.
    It is incomprehensible, they fight
    with one another and within each religion also…
    This is not the fault of God or God’s religions, it is the fault of the people who have not read the books of God properly.

    Askin Ozcan
    Author of: SMALL MIRACLES
    ISBN 1598001000 (Outskirts Press)

  7. on 25 Oct 2008 at 10:20 am 7.Red O'Brien said …

    Askin, does the Bible advocate killing people?

  8. on 25 Oct 2008 at 3:38 pm 8.SteveK said …

    Does the bible advocate killing? If by advocate you mean ‘encourage’ then no. If you mean ‘permit’ then yes.

  9. on 25 Oct 2008 at 3:57 pm 9.Red O'Brien said …

    Steve, no offense, but I wasn’t asking you, I was asking the man whose screen name is “askin.”

    I like to seek a variety of opinions.

  10. on 25 Oct 2008 at 4:46 pm 10.GotMooo said …

    What is the moral difference between encouraging murder and just permitting it? And can permitting murder encourage it when deemed applicable by a party to do so?

  11. on 25 Oct 2008 at 6:14 pm 11.SteveK said …

    Steve, no offense, but I wasn’t asking you

    No offense taken. Sorry to have interrupted.

  12. on 25 Oct 2008 at 6:45 pm 12.SteveK said …

    What is the moral difference between encouraging murder and just permitting it?

    The question was about killing, not murder, so I’m going to answer your question wrt killing. Encouraging seeks to increase killing by not considering circumstance, which is not a virtue. Permitting seeks to reduce killing by considering the circumstance, which is a virtue.

    And can permitting murder encourage it when deemed applicable by a party to do so?

    Can it? Yes. Must it? No. The difference between the two is grace. A person may be justified (deemed applicable, as you said) in killing, but may choose to be gracious and not do it. Gracious or not gracious, the justification remains.

  13. on 25 Oct 2008 at 7:04 pm 13.SteveK said …

    SteveK, surely if you are this rational you have to have problems with your fellow Christians?

    Do I have problems with some Christians? Of course! We’re all sinners and we all screw up. I have big problems with a certain Christian named SteveK. He’s a real loser sometimes.

    Do you feel it is alright to discriminate people simply because they have no religion?

    No, unless having no religion weighs heavily into the decision you are making. As an example, a person without religion should not be allowed to become a Catholic priest – unless the church approves of it. That’s a form of discrimination that I support. Discrimination is not wrong 100% of the time.

  14. on 25 Oct 2008 at 11:12 pm 14.GotMooo said …

    On your first post encouraging can be vague. It could mean encouraging for another reason based on a particular reason. On your second post I agree.

  15. on 26 Oct 2008 at 7:35 pm 15.AB said …

    What another stupid article? Who writes this stuff? As a Christian who spent several months in the Saudi Arabia (BTW, it’s all the same above about 115 degrees), I can say no question about no other religion allowed. I did not even think about bringing a bible. But that’s Saudi. Now, to say such is the inverse in the US is simply ludicrious. You don’t even show data to support your position. What is even more amazing are those folks who respond favorably to you. But they’re really you, aren’t they? You’re just making your views look more popular than they really are when you are just commenting under different alias. Please note that I just gave the same amount of proof/reason you did for several or your silly blogs (so therefore the above must be true!). You need help.

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